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ASHA NEWS

Call for Abstracts opening soon
ASHA
The Call for Abstracts for the 89th Annual School Health Conference: Going the Distance will open soon! Abstracts can be submitted under one of the following tracks, or themes: Administration, Coordination and Leadership; Programs and Services; Research and Emerging Issues and Teaching and Learning. With the exception of the Research and Emerging Issues track, we are offering 60-minute, 30-minute sessions and poster presentations. Please visit our conference webpage for additional information as it becomes available. Registration will open in the spring.
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Register now for today's webinar on heroin prevention
ASHA
Don’t miss your chance to participate in Prevention is Powerful: Heroin and the Teen Brain today, Tuesday, Feb. 10, at 2 p.m. ET. Presented by Kris Adzia, MS, Director of Education; and Rosanne Tenuta, Health Educator, Heroin Prevention Program Facilitator, Robert Crown Center for Health Education (RCC), this session will explores the Heroin Prevention Program developed by the RCC. The webinar qualifies for 1.0 Category I CECH; 1.0 CNE Contact Hour and 1.0 Certificate of Attendance. ASHA Members receive continuing education credit free of charge. Non-members must purchase CE credit for $30. Click here to purchase.
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It's not too late to volunteer for ASHA
ASHA
We are always looking for more great volunteers to help ASHA be the best it can be to our members and stakeholders. If you are interested in rolling up your sleeves to help us deliver a great conference, launch our new networking communities or to help in some other capacity, send us an email and let us know!
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INDUSTRY NEWS


How schools are dealing with anti-vaccine parents
The Atlantic
The debates over vaccinations are often cast as arguments over the integrity of science. But they can just as easily be understood as conversations about power, writes Eula Biss, a senior lecturer at Northwestern University, in her book, On Immunity: An Inoculation. As it stands, all 50 states require specific vaccines for school-aged children, although each grants exemptions for students unable to be vaccinated for medical reasons.
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Michelle Obama announces funding to fight childhood obesity
The Associated Press via ABC News
First lady Michelle Obama visited a school on Manhattan's Upper West Side recently to announce a $500 million donation funding the fight against childhood obesity. As she watched teenagers prepare smoothies at the Edward A. Reynolds West Side High School and stepped into a room of students taking a spin class, Obama noted that it was the fifth anniversary of the federal Let's Move effort.
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Transgender kids aren't confused about their identities
Reuters
Transgender youngsters identify as much with their genders as do non-transgender children, a new study says. The findings indicate that transgender children are not confused or delayed in their understanding of gender, as some have suggested, write the researchers in Psychological Science.
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Study: Super Bowl beer ads make kids and teens more likely to drink
Healthline
A new study confirms what those who would like to ban alcohol advertising already know — it works, even on teenagers. In research published online in JAMA Pediatrics, pediatrician Dr. Susanne E. Tanski of the Geisel School of Medicine at the Children’s Hospital at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, and colleagues showed that teens receptive to alcohol ads on television were more likely to imbibe.
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Teenage misperception of weight may lead to adult obesity
Medical News Today
A new study due to be published Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, suggests that teenagers who have a false perception of themselves as being overweight are more likely to become obese as adults. The authors of the new study, from Florida State University College of Medicine in Tallahassee, were interested in what the health outcomes might be for teenagers of a healthy weight who misperceived themselves as being overweight.
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Study suggests soda habit may prompt early puberty in girls
HealthDay News
Girls who consume a lot of sugary drinks may enter puberty earlier than girls who don't, Harvard researchers report. Among nearly 5,600 girls aged 9 to 14 who were followed between 1996 and 2001, the researchers found that those who drank more than 1.5 servings of sugary drinks a day had their first period 2.7 months earlier than those who drank two or fewer of these drinks a week.
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Exposure to common pesticide may increase risk of ADHD
PsychCentral
A new lab study by scientists from several prominent universities suggests a commonly used pesticide may increase the risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children. Researchers believe the pesticide alters the development of the brain’s dopamine system, the part of the brain responsible for emotional expression and cognitive function.
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High-quality early education could reduce costs
The Washington Post
High-quality early childhood programs can reduce the number of children diagnosed with certain learning disabilities by third grade, according to a study published in the Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis journal. The study, conducted by Clara G. Muschkin, Helen F. Ladd and Kenneth A. Dodge of Duke University, could have significant implications for reducing the financial burden special education services place on municipal budgets.
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Study reports that electronic devices may disrupt teen sleep
HealthDay News
Spending too much time using electronic devices during the day harms teens' sleep, a new study suggests. The research included nearly 10,000 Norwegian teens, aged 16 to 19, who were asked how much screen time they got during the day outside of school, and about the amount and quality of their sleep.
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LGBTQ youth study reveals that it really 'does get better' over time
Reuters via The Huffington Post
Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning adolescents who face bullying and other types of abuse have been told in the media, "it gets better" — and new research supports that claim. In a multi-year study of LGBTQ youth, researchers found that being the victim of bullying and other abuse was linked to psychological distress, but both distress and victimization decreased as the adolescents grew up.
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New study finds that teen smokers use multiple tobacco products
News-Medical.net
Teens who use tobacco products are likely to use more than one product, including e-cigarettes, hookahs and pipes and smokeless tobacco, according to a new study by RTI International. The study, published in Pediatrics, found 14.7 percent of middle and high school students use one or more tobacco products.
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Kids with behavior problems likely to have sex earlier than peers
Reuters via Fox News
Kids with behavior problems became sexually active earlier than their peers, in a recent study. Having sex early — before age 16 — increases the risk of teen pregnancy, partner violence, sexually transmitted infections and other negative health outcomes, the researchers say.
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New study: Playing tackle football as a child could be especially risky for the brain
Vox
By now, it's pretty well-established that playing tackle football can lead to long-term mental problems. But as part of ongoing research, scientists are increasingly finding that younger players' brains are especially vulnerable to concussions. The latest piece of evidence for this idea is a new study, published in the journal Neurology.
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