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ASHA NEWS

ASHA's 2015 Call for Abstracts is open
ASHA
We invite you to submit your abstracts for the 89th Annual School Health Conference: Going the Distance which will take place Oct. 15-17 in Orlando, FL! Don't miss your chance to inspire your colleagues in the school health industry. Abstracts can be submitted under one of the following tracks, or themes: Administration, Coordination and Leadership; Programs and Services; Research and Emerging Issues; and Teaching and Learning. With the exception of the Research and Emerging Issues track, we are offering 60- and 30- minute sessions, and poster presentations. Please visit our conference webpage for additional information as it becomes available. Registration will open in the spring.
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Go green and support ASHA
ASHA
Did you know that you can access every issue and the full archive of the Journal of School Health (JOSH) online? Click here to login, then click on "JOSH Online." One great way that you can support ASHA is to go green with your annual subscription of JOSH, which costs $70 per member to print and mail. If you don't need or want to receive hardcopies of your member subscription of JOSH, please contact info@ashaweb.org and we'll be glad to take your name off of the mailing list.
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INDUSTRY NEWS


More schools serving dinner as need increases
District Administration Magazine
Districts including Los Angeles USD and Dallas ISD will expand after-school supper programs this year, responding to the growing number of students who don't get an evening meal at home. Nationwide, the number of students served dinner or an after-school snack reached nearly 1 million last year. In 2010, the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act expanded after-school meal programs to all 50 states after piloting them in 13 states and the District of Columbia.
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Bullying prevention: Can students make kindness cool?
The Christian Science Monitor
Schools are increasingly turning to students to develop and implement anti-bullying initiatives designed not just to discourage bullying, but also to empower students to intervene.
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Sharp rise in occupational therapy cases at New York's schools
The New York Times
A class of first graders at Public School 503 in Brooklyn sat on the floor one recent Friday, cross-legged on an alphabet-themed rug. But as their teacher began a reading lesson, two boys positioned near the letters C and D sat not on the rug, but in small plastic armchairs. One wore a tight blue vest designed to apply pressure to his chest, while the other drew his hands across a weighted, velvety blanket draped over his small knees.
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Better night's sleep may help kids with ADHD
Reuters
Kids with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and sleep problems showed slight improvement in their symptoms after undergoing a behavioral sleep intervention, Australian researchers say. The daytime improvement in ADHD symptoms was partly the result of the kids getting a better night's sleep, and possibly of parents' learning methods for dealing with behavior problems, the study found. "Our previous work found that sleep problems were common in children with ADHD and associated with poorer behavior, ADHD symptoms, quality of life and day-to-day functioning, such as getting ready for school," said lead author Dr. Harriet Hiscock, a pediatrician at Murdoch Children's Research at the Royal Children's Hospital in Victoria.
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Increase in teenagers' screen use a new threat to long-term health
Medical News Today
New research released by Cancer Council Australia and the National Heart Foundation of Australia shows Australian teenagers are spending increasing time in front of electronic devices such as computers, laptops, tablets, video games and TV. The updated National Secondary Students' Diet and Activity Survey found 77 percent of Australian teenagers spent more than two hours using electronic devices for entertainment on school days, compared with 71 percent in 2009. The proportion of teenagers exceeding the recommended two hours of screen time per day on weekends also increased, from 83 to 89 percent.
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Positive youth-parent bonds can reduce teen suicide attempts
PsychCentral
A new study of the connection between adolescents and their parents discovers a caring relationship can be key to preventing suicide attempts. Sadly, suicide is the third leading cause of death for 15-to-24-year-olds in the U.S., after accidental injuries and homicide. In the study, University of British Columbia researchers examined the link between parental bonding, a term describing the quality of a parent-child relationship, and a history of suicidal thoughts and attempts. Numerous studies suggest that positive parental relationships reduce adolescents’ risk of experiencing depression, loneliness and suicide.
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Amid measles outbreak, few rules on teacher vaccinations
The Associated Press via ABC News
While much of the attention in the ongoing measles outbreak has focused on student vaccination requirements and exemptions, less attention has been paid to another group in the nation's classrooms: Teachers and staff members, who, by and large, are not required to be vaccinated. In most states, there is no law dictating which vaccines teachers and school staff workers are required to get. Some states provide a list of recommended vaccines, but there is no requirement or follow-up for teachers to receive them. So when a measles case surfaced at a California high school, it was easy for officials to review student records, but there were no immunization records on file for employees.
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Poll: Half of parents support delayed school start times for adolescents
News-Medical.Net
Should teenagers be able to hit the snooze button one more time before school? Ask their parents and half say they would support later school start times, according to today's University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. More schools across the country are exploring delayed school start times as research shows benefits for adolescents' physical and mental health, including reduced risks of obesity and depression.
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Homeless children's stress is taking its toll; 25 percent need mental health services
Medical Daily
It's hard to imagine, walking the streets of most big cities, that children can be homeless too. After all, they're rarely the ones asking for money on the streets or busking. But child homelessness is at an all-time high; 2.5 million kids were homeless at some point in 2013, living out of cars, shelters, and abandoned buildings. All this time spent as a vagrant leaves little time for doing things they should be doing, like going to school, and most importantly, enjoying childhood. Now, a new study finds 25 percent of these kids need mental health services as soon as possible.
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Serving kids fruits and vegetables is not a waste of time
Deseret News
Serving a child fruits and vegetables isn't a waste of time, even if the child doesn't like or won't eat them, according to a new study from the University of Arizona. The study found that exposure to a food in childhood is related to liking that food in adulthood, regardless of whether the child liked the food at the time. Being exposed to a food increased liking both healthy and unhealthy foods, so there's some evidence that decreasing a child's exposure to unhealthy foods will make those foods less desirable in the long run.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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