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ASHA NEWS

Submit your abstract for ASHA's 2015 Conference by March 27
ASHA
We invite you to submit your abstracts for the 89th Annual School Health Conference: Going the Distance which will take place Oct. 15-17 in Orlando, FL! Don't miss your chance to inspire your colleagues in the school health field. Abstracts can be submitted under one of the following tracks, or themes: Administration, Coordination and Leadership; Programs and Services; Research and Emerging Issues; and Teaching and Learning. With the exception of the Research and Emerging Issues track, we are offering 60- and 30- minute sessions, and poster presentations. Please visit our conference webpage for additional information as it becomes available. Registration will open in the spring.
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Register now for upcoming webinar on Results-Oriented Evaluation
ASHA
Registration is now open for Results-Oriented Evaluation which is scheduled on Tuesday, March 24 at 2 p.m. EST. Presented by Jeanie Alter, PhD, MCHES, Project Manager and Lead Evaluator, Indiana Prevention Resource Center, this session will explore the benefits of a well-designed program evaluation. The webinar qualifies for 1.0 Category I CECH; 1.0 CPE; 1.0 CNE Contact Hour; 1.0 IC&RC Domain 1 (Planning and Evaluation) Continuing Education; and 1.0 Certificate of Attendance. ASHA Members receive continuing education credit free of charge. Non-members must purchase CE credit for $30. Click here to purchase.
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Have you visited ASHA's Career Center?
ASHA
Both members and non-members can use ASHA's Career Center to reach qualified candidates. Employers can post jobs online, search for qualified candidates based on specific job criteria and create an online resume agent to email qualified candidates daily. You can also benefit from online reporting that provides job activity statistics.

For job seekers, ASHA's Career Center is a free service that provides access to employers and jobs in the school health field. In addition to posting your resume, you can browse and view available jobs based on your criteria and save those jobs for later review if you choose. You can also create a search agent to provide email notifications of jobs that match your criteria.

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INDUSTRY NEWS


Tackling eating disorders with school-based initiatives
U.S. News and World Report
Advocates are pushing for school-based initiatives to raise awareness about the dangers of eating disorders, which kill more Americans than any other psychiatric illness. "Educators have a real opportunity to disseminate healthful messages and address issues that are impairing the quality of life of many students," says Rebecca Puhl, deputy director of the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at the University of Connecticut and co-author of a study that found strong public support for school-based strategies that address eating disorders and weight stigmatization.
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Teachers become healthier when they learn
University West via ScienceDaily
Several studies have indicated a connection between learning and health. In a recently published study from University West and Linnaeus University the researchers found that the health of school teachers is related to their level of work integrated learning. A random sample of 229 teachers at 20 schools in Västra Götaland responded to a questionnaire which included previously tested measures of health, quality and work integrated learning. The resulting data showed a highly significant statistical correlation between the measures.
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Study: 1 in 5 teen girls victim of dating violence
USA Today
Twenty-one percent of high school girls have been physically or sexually assaulted by someone they dated — a figure twice as high as previously estimated, a new study shows. Ten percent of high school boys also report having been physically or sexually assaulted by a dating partner, about the same rate reported in earlier surveys, according to a study led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published recently in JAMA Pediatrics. Authors of the new report note that the CDC has changed the way it phrases its questions about teen dating violence, leading more students to report assaults.
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Preventing suicide with a 'contagion of strength'
NPR
For Whitney Bischoff, high school was tough. On the first day of her freshman year, a childhood friend committed suicide. Things weren't any better at home — her father died when she was 7 and her mom was an alcoholic with an abusive boyfriend. She had a hard time making friends. And when all the stress threatened to overwhelm her, she, too, considered suicide. "I thought family was everything," Bischoff says. "I thought, if I didn't have family support — what am I going to do? Suicide seemed like the only way out."
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High school athletes need more help with mental health issues
Reuters
While concussions and physical injuries in high school sports are commanding more attention, young athletes still aren't getting enough help with mental health issues such as depression, bullying, substance abuse and eating disorders, experts say. New guidelines released recently at the sixth Youth Sports Safety Summit in Dallas, hosted by the National Athletic Trainers' Association and the Youth Sports Safety Alliance, urge coaches and parents to be more vigilant in watching for signs of mental distress.
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Study: More children eat fruit in school
The New York Times
Changes made to government-subsidized meals by the Obama administration to get schoolchildren to eat more fruits are having their intended effect, according to a study released recently. The study, by the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at the University of Connecticut, found that from the time the changes went into effect in 2012 through last year, the percentage of students choosing fruit on a cafeteria line increased to 66 percent from 54 percent.
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Playtime isn't just for preschoolers — teenagers need it, too
TIME
In classrooms across the country, the countdown to summer vacation has begun. The winter doldrums have always taken a toll, but in the era of test-dominated schooling and the controversial Common Core, it seems increasingly that it's not until summer that teenagers have any prospect for having fun anymore. One of the casualties of current education reform efforts has been the erosion of play, creativity and joy from teenagers' classrooms and lives, with devastating effects. Researchers have documented a rise in mental health problems — such as anxiety and depression — among young people that has paralleled a decline in children's opportunities to play.
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High schools and middle schools are failing victims of sexual assault
U.S. News & World Report
Daisy Coleman switched high schools after allegations that another student had raped her sparked outrage and national headlines. Still, the 17-year-old's struggle to live a normal life was made even harder recently, when her new principal told her she could not attend prom because, according to Coleman's mother, the school couldn't guarantee that she wouldn't be harassed there. "Because he can't protect her, he is going to punish her more," Melinda Coleman, Daisy’s mother, said at a press conference. The principal eventually changed course, but it didn't undo the trauma Daisy — who has been hospitalized multiple times for self-harm and eating disorders since the night of the alleged assault — has faced since making the accusations against a well-known football player in her small Missouri community.
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Study suggests mental reflection and rest boost learning
Psychology Today
Keep your "nose to the grindstone" is the advice we often tell young people is an essential ingredient of learning difficult tasks. A joke captures the matter with the old bromide for success, "Keep your eye on the ball, your ear to the ground, your nose to the grindstone, your shoulder to the wheel: Now try to work in that position."
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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