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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit          March 24, 2015

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ASHA NEWS

Register for today's webinar on Results-Oriented Evaluation
ASHA
Registration is still open for Results-Oriented Evaluation which is scheduled today, March 24 at 2 p.m. ET. Presented by Jeanie Alter, PhD, MCHES, Project Manager and Lead Evaluator, Indiana Prevention Resource Center, this session will review the benefits of a well-designed program evaluation. The webinar qualifies for 1.0 Category I CECH; 1.0 CNE Contact Hour; 1.0 Certificate of Attendance; and 1 hour CE relevant to the ICRC domain 1. ASHA Members receive continuing education credit free of charge. Nonmembers must purchase CE credit for $30. Click here to purchase.
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Deadline to submit your abstract for ASHA's 2015 Conference is Friday
ASHA
There's just 3 and a half days left to submit your abstracts for the 89th Annual School Health Conference: Going the Distance which will take place Oct. 15-17 in Orlando, Florida! Don't miss your chance to inspire your colleagues in the school health industry. Abstracts can be submitted under one of the following tracks, or themes: Administration, Coordination and Leadership; Programs and Services; Research and Emerging Issues; and Teaching and Learning. With the exception of the Research and Emerging Issues track, we are offering 60- and 30- minute sessions, and poster presentations. Please visit our conference webpage for additional information as it becomes available. Registration will open in the spring.
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Support ASHA while you shop
ASHA
Did you know that ASHA is registered with the AmazonSmile program which allows Amazon shoppers to direct a 0.5 percent of their purchases as a donation to ASHA? Whenever you plan to use Amazon to fulfill your shopping needs, start by clicking this link (be sure to bookmark it!) so that all of your Amazon purchases can be tracked in support of your donation to ASHA. Happy shopping and thank you in advance for your support of School Health!
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INDUSTRY NEWS


Better breakfast, better grades
Medical News Today
A new study from the University of Iowa reinforces the connection between good nutrition and good grades, finding that free school breakfasts help students from low-income families perform better academically. The study finds students who attend schools that participate in the U.S. Department of Agriculture's School Breakfast Program have higher achievement scores in math, science, and reading than students in schools that don't participate. "These results suggest that the persistent exposure to the relatively more nutritious breakfast offered through the subsidized breakfast program throughout elementary school can yield important gains in achievement," says researcher David Frisvold, assistant professor of economics in the Tippie College of Business.
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Afterschool programs help improve kids' health and physical fitness
News-Medical.Net
Afterschool programs are emerging as an effective tool in the nation's ongoing battle against childhood obesity, according to a national household survey conducted by Shugoll Research for the Afterschool Alliance. The special report released today, Kids on the Move: Afterschool Programs Promoting Healthy Eating and Physical Activity, reveals parents' views about the role afterschool programs play in improving kids' health and physical fitness. Findings are based on responses collected for America After 3 p.m. from 30,000 U.S. households, including in-depth interviews with more than 13,000 parents and guardians.
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Just how common is ADHD, really? A new study may have the answer
ADDitude Magazine
For as long as ADHD has been recognized by the medical community, the rate at which it occurs in children has been disputed, ranging from as low as 3 percent to as high as 14 percent. The conflicting numbers confuse parents, doctors, and patients, who struggle to determine if the condition is over-diagnosed — and over-medicated — or under-diagnosed. A new study published in Pediatrics claims to have identified a benchmark estimate for the worldwide rate of ADHD in children. The study's authors analyzed the data from 175 studies from around the world, conducted over 36 years, to reach their overall estimate: approximately 7.2 percent of children worldwide have ADHD.
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Skill-building approaches to anxiety-fueled work avoidance
The Huffington Post
Those of us who have spent over 10 years in the field know firsthand that the face of the classroom has changed considerably. Long gone are the days when simple, whole class behavior incentive plans kept every student on an even keel. Even experienced teachers may not be sufficiently prepared to address the social and emotional needs of today's students, especially those struggling with anxiety. Anxiety disorders are alarmingly prevalent among U.S. children and adolescents, with 31.9 percent of teens having had an anxiety disorder during their school years. Add to that other increasingly prevalent childhood conditions, including ADHD and autism, and teachers are facing new and overwhelming challenges.
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What is being done to help special needs students who are bullied
Deseret News
When a middle school cheerleader with Down syndrome was being bullied, the team she cheered for came to her rescue. During a basketball game, students in the stands taunted Desiree Andrews, according to KTLA, a local news station in Wisconsin. The team's players then walked off the court and confronted the bullies about their actions. "We were mad. We didn't like that," Miles Rodriguez, one of the players who walked off the court, said, according to Fox News.
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Chef-enhanced school meals increase healthy food consumption
Medical Xpress
Schools collaborating with a professionally trained chef to improve the taste of healthy meals significantly increased students' fruit and vegetable consumption, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The study also found that using "choice architecture" (environmental nudges to promote healthy choices) in school cafeterias improved students' selection of fruits and vegetables, but did not increase consumption over the long-term. The study is the first to examine the long-term impact of choice architecture and chef-enhanced meals in school cafeterias on selection and consumption of healthier foods.
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Water fluoridation linked to higher ADHD rates
MSN
New research shows there is a strong correlation between water fluoridation and the prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, in the United States. It's the first time that scientists have systematically studied the relationship between the behavioral disorder and fluoridation, the process wherein fluoride is added to water to prevent cavities.
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Minority children may benefit most from school-day exercise
Medical News Today
Racial/ethnic minority children residing in low-resource areas of Missouri may benefit the most from school-based opportunities for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, suggests a new study from researchers at Washington University School of Medicine and St Louis Public Schools. As part of their study, researchers measured the MVPA heart rate of urban public elementary school children in Missouri on school days with and school days without PE class by using continuous heart rate monitoring. The heart rate of 81 students (93.8 percent black) in grades 3 and 5 was recorded in 15-second intervals. On the basis of 575 school-day observations, students accumulated 44.4 minutes of MVPA on days with PE and 30.6 MVPA minutes on days without PE.
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Sleeping to improve STEM education
The Journal
A new multidisciplinary project from the University of Arizona will encourage elementary students to consider careers in science, technology, engineering and math by involving them in research involving their own sleep patterns. With funding from the National Science Foundation, two researchers have instigated the "Sleep Education Program To Improve STEM Education in Elementary School," otherwise known as the "Z-Factor." Along the way, the project will address a real-world issue, sleep insufficiency, and its health consequences.
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