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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit          April 21, 2015

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ASHA NEWS

Save the Date for ASHA's School Health Conference!
ASHA
The 89th annual School Health Conference is scheduled on Oct. 15-17 in Orlando, FL. ASHA has secured a discounted room rate of $149 per night plus tax at the Hilton Orlando Lake Buena Vista which will be available until Monday, Sept. 14 or until the block is filled. Please call 1-800-782-4414 and request the ASHA room block. Please note that we will start bright and early on Thursday, Oct. 15 with pre-conference sessions on the topics of "Coordinated School Health" and "Gender Identity Issues," so if you are interested in attending those, you might want to plan to arrive as early as Wednesday, Oct. 14. The main conference sessions that come with the full registration rate will kick off at 1pm which may afford you the ability to arrive early Thursday morning. The conference will conclude around 12:30pm on Saturday, Oct. 17. More information will be available when we open online registration in early May!
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Deadlines for 2015 Awards and Future Leaders Academy Approaching
ASHA
Please click here for details on the 2015 William A. Howe, Fellow, and Distinguished Service awards and to submit your application. All nominations are due by close of business on Monday, May 4. Please send all nomination materials to Ashley Dowling at adowling@ashaweb.org. Winners will be notified in late June and will be honored during the 89th Annual School Health Conference in Orlando Florida, Oct. 15-17. Click here to learn more about the Future Leaders Academy (FLA) to identify and train individuals for future leadership roles in the American School Health Association. The FLA builds skills and familiarizes young professionals with the programs and activities of the Association. FLA. To apply, please complete the FLA application by May 15.
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Go green and support ASHA
ASHA
Did you know that you can access every issue and the full archive of the Journal of School Health (JOSH) online? Click here to login, then click on "JOSH Online." One great way that you can support ASHA is to go green with your annual subscription of JOSH, which costs $70 per member to print and mail. If you don't need or want to receive hardcopies of your member subscription of JOSH, please contact info@ashaweb.org and we’ll be glad to take your name off of the mailing list.
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INDUSTRY NEWS


Sext education? Missouri bill would require lessons on explicit texts, predators
Education Week
Evie Blad, a contributor for Education Week, writes: "Most school administrators I meet recognize that students' use of online and mobile technologies present new concerns about their well-being, ethical challenges and legal issues for schools. But there is little concensus about the best way to address those concerns, particularly when it comes to the sexually explicit messages students share with their peers. Those messages (known as sexts to anyone under the age of 30), can spread quickly through social networks, destroying reputations in the process. And sharing explicit images and videos may lead to child pornography charges if the subject is underaged. A dozen Michigan students, for example, may face child pornography charges after sharing text messages with naked photos of a peer."
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High school, middle school kids now use more e-cigs than tobacco: CDC
The Washington Post
The number of middle and high school students using electronic cigarettes tripled between 2013 and 2014, according to government figures, a startling increase that public health officials fear could reverse decades of efforts combating the scourge of smoking. The use of e-cigarettes among teenagers has eclipsed the use of traditional cigarettes and all other tobacco products, a development that Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, called "alarming" and "shocking."
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Higher altitude states have fewer kids with ADHD, study finds
HealthDay News via U.S. News & World Report
The thin air of America's higher-elevation regions may reduce the risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, a new study suggests. Researchers reported that the occurrence of ADHD decreases substantially as altitude increases. For example, Utah has an average state elevation of 6,100 feet. That state's ADHD rate is half that of states at sea level, they said. It's important to note though that the current study's design can only show a link between altitude and a lower incidence of ADHD. It can't prove a cause-and-effect relationship.
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Kids and anxiety: Many theories exist as to why some kids are anxious and others aren't
The Record
Frustrated parents want to know, "Why?" One in four children suffers from an anxiety disorder during childhood and adolescence, according to experts, but why is this particular child in that 25 percent? Why him instead of his classmate? Why her and not her twin sister? What happened? Why won't it just go away? There are a lot of theories and continuing research as to why some children develop anxiety disorders while others — even those raised in the same environment by the same parents — do not.
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Withholding recess as a punishment declines
Education Week
It's not uncommon for elementary school teachers to take away recess time to discipline students. Withholding cherished playtime clearly communicates to children that their misbehavior is unacceptable, they argue. But more and more, schools are doing away with withholding recess for disciplinary reasons, pointing to research findings that unstructured play and exercise benefit students both inside and outside the classroom.
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Schools becoming the 'last frontier' for hungry kids
USA Today
America's schools are no longer just a place for students to learn their ABCs. They are also increasingly where children eat their three squares. The classroom has become a dining room as more children attending public schools live in poverty. More than half of students in public schools — 51 percent — were in low-income families in 2013, according to a study by the Southern Education Foundation. The number of low-income children in public schools has been persistent and steadily rising over the past several decades. In 1989, 32 percent of children in public schools lived in poverty, the foundation says.
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Children take more risks crossing streets than parents think
Reuters
Children may cut things closer than their parents realize when it comes to guessing how far cars are from an intersection or how long it takes to safely reach the other side, a small study suggests. Using virtual reality, researchers tested how often kids might walk into oncoming traffic in real life. The results show that "parents may be over-estimating how careful their children are" and missing opportunities to teach kids safer habits, study author Dr. Barbara Morrongiello, a psychology professor at the University of Guelph in Ontario, said.
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Study: Half of kids admit to hurtful social networking
Detroit Free Press
Armed with cellphones and a dizzying array of social media choices, one-half of middle- and high school students in a recent study admit to social media abuse — from bullying schoolmates to spreading rumors to pressuring others to send sexual texts or pictures. They also admitted to stalking their partners. "It begins with the constant texting or the stalking on Facebook. 'Where are you?' and 'Who are you with?' " said researcher Poco Kernsmith, an associate professor of social work at Wayne State University.
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5 tips for mitigating bullying in schools
Education Dive
Bullying is a very real issue in schools, and it is only being exacerbated by the rise of anonymous online platforms such as Yik Yak, an app that allows users to post digital comments viewable by anyone within a set distance. While everyone knows bullying is bad, it often persists in schools because nobody quite knows how to handle it. Students can be told to stop, but what if that doesn't do anything? Pushing perpetrators of bullying out of school may help the victim, but it doesn't actually solve the problem.
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Children taught about sexual abuse more likely to report it
Medical News Today
For the review, published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, researchers examined published studies covering nearly 6,000 elementary and high school children in several countries around the world. They found that of those children who received education in how to prevent sexual abuse, around 14 in 1,000 disclosed some form of sexual abuse, compared with 4 in 1,000 of children who did not receive it.
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Study: Sleep disturbances can hamper memory processes in children
News-Medical.Net
Sleep disordered breathing can hamper memory processes in children, according to a new study. The research, which will be presented today at the Sleep and Breathing Conference, found that disrupted sleep had an impact on different memory processes and how children learn. Eszter Csabi led a team of researchers from the University of Szeged and Eötvös Loránd University in Hungary. They analysed 17 children with sleep disordered breathing aged between 6 and 12 years. They looked at different memory processes compared to a control group of 17 children of similar age without any sleep disorders.
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3 ways technology can support positive behavior in schools
eSchool News
According to the federal Education Department, more than 19,000 U.S. schools are using School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, an evidence-based framework to reduce disciplinary infractions, improve the school climate and increase student achievement. Similar to Response to Intervention, PBIS takes a three-tiered approach to instilling positive behavior in schools. Tier 1 focuses on interventions used on a school wide basis for all students, such as actively teaching and reinforcing appropriate behaviors.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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