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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit          May 05, 2015

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ASHA NEWS

Register now for ASHA's School Health Conference!
ASHA
Registration is now open for ASHA's 89th annual School Health Conference that is scheduled Oct. 15-17 in Orlando, FL. ASHA has secured a discounted room rate of $149 per night plus tax at the Hilton Orlando Lake Buena Vista which will be available until Monday, Sept. 14, 2015, or until the block is filled. Please call 1-800-782-4414 or reserve your room online and request the ASHA room block. Please visit our website for more conference details as well as discounts on Disney theme parks and golf courses.
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Deadlines for 2015 Awards and Future Leaders Academy approaching
ASHA
Please click here to learn more about the Future Leaders Academy (FLA) which aims to identify and train individuals for future leadership roles in the American School Health Association. The FLA builds skills and familiarizes young professionals with the programs and activities of the Association. To apply, please complete the FLA application by May 15, 2015.
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Support ASHA while you shop for Mother's Day
ASHA
Mother's Day is around the corner... Did you know that you can celebrate your Mom and support ASHA at the same time? ASHA has registered with the AmazonSmile program which can direct a percentage of your purchases as a donation back to ASHA. So when you go to buy your Mom that gift this week, and whenever you plan to use Amazon to fulfill your shopping needs, start by clicking this link (be sure to bookmark it!) so that all of your Amazon purchases can be tracked in support of your donation to ASHA. Happy shopping!
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INDUSTRY NEWS


Doctors say head lice should not bar kids from school
HealthDay News via Medical Xpress
Outbreaks of head lice in kids can be effectively treated without banning infected children from school, new guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics say. In fact, the AAP believes that doctors and other health care professionals should educate schools and communities that "no-nit" policies are unfair and should not be implemented. Children found to have head lice or nits can finish the school day, be treated and return to school, the AAP says.
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Education Department reminds schools they can't ignore LGBT harassment
The Huffington Post
The U.S. Department of Education released guidance to remind schools that they must respond to reports of harassment based on gender identity or sexual orientation, and that each school is expected to have a Title IX coordinator handling such cases. The Education Department's Dear Colleague letter and resource guide is the latest step in the Obama administration's ramping up of enforcement under Title IX, which bars discrimination on the basis of sex in K-12 schools and colleges. The department clarified in a major 2011 release that colleges must address allegations of sexual assault on campus, and last year it said that Title IX protects gay and transgender students from discrimination as well.
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Depression, suicidal tendency common among teens who are victims of bullying in school
News-Medical.Net
High school students subjected to bullying and other forms of harassment are more likely to report being seriously depressed, consider suicide and carry weapons to school, according to findings from a trio of studies reported at the Pediatric Academic Societies meeting in San Diego. "Teens can be the victim of face-to-face bullying in school, electronic bullying outside of the classroom and dating violence," said Andrew Adesman, MD, senior investigator of all three studies. "Each of these experiences are associated with a range of serious adverse consequences."
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How schools can keep students safe, and on Facebook
eSchool News
Today, educators are implementing exciting technological advances in teaching and learning. e-Learning and a broadening acceptance of social media, online collaboration, and other forms of technological engagement are shaping how we view education, and what it will look like going forward. However, this paradigm shift also opens a Pandora's Box of threats that require administrators to rethink IT strategies and solutions.
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Eating disorders: How teachers and coaches can help
By: Amanda Kowalski
She runs three miles every day, but she always seems to be on a diet. He doesn't hang out with his friends as much because he has to work out. She seems thin to everyone else, but says she's fat. Half a million American teens between age 13 and 18 struggle with some sort of eating disorder. The results can be serious, ranging from tooth decay and fatigue to high blood pressure and even death, according to the National Eating Disorders Association. How can teachers and coaches tell if one of their students has an eating disorder? And what can they do?
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For kids, bullying by peers is worse than abuse from adults
Healthline
A long-term study shows that children who were bullied have more trouble in adulthood than children mistreated by their parents. Peers may be worse than parents when it comes to the psychological effects of disparaging words and harassment. A study published in The Lancet Psychiatry reports that children who were bullied by peers had significant mental health problems as adults — even more significant than children who were mistreated by their parents or caregivers.
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Teens who abuse study drugs face legal, health problems in the future
Chicago Tribune
Tucked inside dresser drawers, sold in school bathrooms and popped before exams, "study drugs" like Adderall are prescription medications that many teens are familiar with. The pills are sold and traded with bold promises: You'll be able to study all night, focus all day, boost your test scores, suppress your appetite and socialize with ease. But with the audacious claims come huge risks and dangerous health repercussions for teens who abuse these drugs.
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Study: This is your teen's brain behind the wheel
Medical News Today
A new study of teenagers and their moms reveals how adolescent brains negotiate risk — and the factors that modulate their risk-taking behind the wheel. In the study, reported in the journal Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 14-year-old subjects completed a simulated driving task while researchers tracked blood flow in their brains. In one trial, the teen driver was alone; in another, the teen's mother was present and watching, said University of Illinois psychology professor Eva Telzer, who led the study.
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ADHD tied to higher risk of eating disorder in kids and teens
HealthDay News
Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder have an increased risk of a certain type of eating disorder, according to a new study. The eating disorder is called loss of control eating syndrome. As the name implies, people with this disorder sometimes can't stop eating, even if they want to, according to the researchers from the Johns Hopkins Children's Center in Baltimore. Their study included 79 children between the ages of 8 and 14. The kids were assessed for ADHD and the eating disorder. Those with ADHD were 12 times more likely to have the eating disorder than those without ADHD, the study revealed.
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Reducing school bus pollution improves children's health
Medical Xpress
Use of clean fuels and updated pollution control measures in the school buses 25 million children ride every day could result in 14 million fewer absences from school a year, based on a study by the University of Michigan and the University of Washington. In research believed to be the first to measure the individual impact on children of the federal mandate to reduce diesel emissions, researchers found improved health and less absenteeism, especially among asthmatic children.
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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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