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Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit          December 02, 2014

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ASHA NEWS

3 ways to support ASHA on Giving Tuesday
ASHA
Happy Giving Tuesday! Today, Dec. 2, is the third annual "Giving Tuesday," a global day dedicated to giving back. Following are three different ways that you can support ASHA and our mission to "transform all schools into places where every student learns and thrives":
    1.) Donate your time by becoming a volunteer. The volunteer application deadline has been extended through Jan. 7, 2015.
    2.) Contribute to our scholarships or Leadership Program.
    3.) Support ASHA while you shop for the holidays. The AmazonSmile program will direct 0.5 percent of your purchases as a donation to ASHA. All you need to do is bookmark https://smile.amazon.com/ch/34-0840812, select American School Health Association as your charity and every time you shop, you support ASHA.
We appreciate your support of our lofty mission!
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INDUSTRY NEWS


Studies examine US meals in schools
Reuters
School meals may be beneficial to students and be better in nutritional quality than meals brought from home, suggests two new studies looking at U.S. students. Elementary school students are more likely to eat breakfast at school if it’s provided in the classroom, compared to another location, researchers write in JAMA Pediatrics.
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Increased risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in obese children
Medical News Today
High blood pressure and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are considered to be emerging health problems related to the childhood obesity epidemic. NAFLD is the inappropriate storage of droplets of fat inside liver cells, and it affects nearly 10 percent of all children in the U.S.
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Being bullied physically changes kids' brains
Salon
Bullying has been taken up by many organizations as a cause du jour — aggressive, threatening groups of children have seemingly always picked easy targets to torture. Now, with social media, the hunt for victims is even easier, and bullying is even more pervasive. A new study from researchers at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles and the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine has found that not only is bullying deeply unpleasant, it physically changes your brain.
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Poor sleep tied to inflammation in teens
Reuters
Teens who don’t get enough sleep may be at risk for chronic problems later in life from increased inflammation throughout the body, according to a new study. Those who didn’t get enough sleep during the week and especially those who slept longer on weekends had higher inflammation levels tied to heart disease and diabetes, researchers report in Sleep Medicine.
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Head trauma may up risk of substance abuse in teens
dailyRx
Teens often engage in risky behaviors, but a head injury may mean double trouble, a new study found. This new study found that teens who had ever had a traumatic brain injury were much more likely to smoke cigarettes and use illegal drugs like meth, cocaine and lysergic acid diethylamide than those who hadn't had a head injury.
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Study suggests many teens suffer 'cyber' dating abuse
HealthDay News via Medical Xpress
Many teens are abused online by the people they're dating, a new study suggests. This abuse can include being monitored, stalked, threatened and harassed through hurtful comments, the researchers said. The findings were based on surveys of teens who visited Northern California school health clinics, and don't hint at how common this kind of abuse among teens is overall.
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Smoking in early teens linked to higher risk of severe menstrual cramps
Medical News Today
Menstrual cramps, also referred to as period pain or dysmenorrhea, affect around 91 percent of women throughout their reproductive life. Of these women, up to 29 percent experience severe menstrual cramps. Although many women are able to carry on with their day-to-day lives during menstrual cramps, the condition can be debilitating in some cases.
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Dating violence among adolescents seen as health risk
Medical Xpress
More than one of every 10 Indiana adolescents experiences dating violence, and victims are more likely to carry a weapon to school, be injured in a fight, suffer depression, drink excessively or even attempt suicide, says a new report from Ball State University. "Less than 10 percent adolescents in the U.S. experienced dating violence in the past decade, while Indiana adolescents consistently reported about an 11 percent rate," said study co-author Cathy Whaley, manager of by Northeast Indiana Area Health Education Center, which is located at Ball State. "We know that incidents of dating violence may impact educational outcomes and social life for adolescents."
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School nurse program increased epinephrine availability to students
Healio
A training program for school nurses in Houston decreased students’ reactions to food allergies and increased student-specific injectable devices, according to recent study results. “It is extremely important for parents to communicate with their children’s schools any known food allergies,” Carla M. Davis, M.D., pediatric immunology, allergy and rheumatology specialist at Texas Children’s Hospital and assistant professor of pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, said in a press release.
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Why are high school football players dying?
USA Today
Death certificates have empty spaces to be filled — even if death, like life, never fits easily into bureaucratic boxes. The death certificate of Damon Janes sketches a terrible story. Usual Occupation: Student. Kind of Business or Industry: High School. Immediate Cause of Death: Blunt impact injury of head. Place of Injury: Football Field.
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Teen drug abuse: Sleep, anxiety meds 12 times more likely to be abused by those with prescriptions
Medical Daily
Prescription and over-the-counter medications are a significant problem for teens. Twelve- to 17-year-olds abuse prescription drugs more than ecstasy, heroin, cocaine and methamphetamines combined — they're the most commonly abused drugs after marijuana. Yet, a new study from the University of Michigan found some cases of abuse stem from the very drugs teens were prescribed.
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