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Quick Links:    Learning Centre Home   CIC Home    About CIC    Conferences   Read Our Magazine September 24, 2014


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O-GlcNAc as a Potential Target for Disease Modifying Therapy in Alzheimer Disease
David Vocadlo
The development of disease modifying therapies targeting Alzheimer disease (AD) is a topic of intense current interest. The two pathological hallmarks of AD are proteinaceous aggregates deposited in the brain that are known as tangles and plaques. We recently proposed a new potential approach to block progression of AD by reducing both tau and Ab toxicity. In this presentation I introduce O-GlcNAc and discuss our research efforts that have focused on validation of OGA as a target for AD. Studies ranging from the rational design of various transition state analogues through to animal studies of efficacy will be described.
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Fresh Water Mussels as Bioindicators: Speciation Changes in Anodonta Kennerlyi Exposed to Mine Impacted Sediments within the Quinsam Watershed, Vancouver Island
William R. Cullen
Over 50 organoarsenicals have now been identified from a wide range of biological compartments. The toxicity of these species is very dependent on their structure and oxidation state. Some are more toxic than their inorganic precursors, especially methylarsonous acid which is implicated as a cause of human disease, especially cancer. The principal arsenic species in methanol/water extracts of the fresh water mussel Anodonta kennerlyi that is found in most Lakes in the Quinsam Watershed, Vancouver Island, are two dimethyl-oxoarsenosugars along with smaller amounts of their thio-analogues.
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 Society News


Professional Development Courses
CIC
Continue to develop your knowledge and skills with these professional development courses: Risk Assessment, Process Safety, Laboratory Safety, and Root Cause Analysis. Risk Assessment takes place Oct. 22-23 in Niagara Falls and all four courses take place Nov. 13-14 in Edmonton.
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Share your opinion and win
CIC
Whether you are a member of the CSC, CSChE, or CSCT, we would like to hear from you. Complete this short survey for a chance to win one of five $50 prepaid VISA cards.
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 Career News


Average starting salaries for engineers: 2014 edition
Talent Egg
Here you'll find a quick round-up of salary estimates for several major Canadian cities. Please note: the figures below represent the median starting salary for each occupation, meaning that 50 per cent of engineers earn less than what is shown below. Of course, this also means that 50 per cent of engineers earn more than the listed salary. All data assumes 0 years of experience.
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Faculty jobs are rare, but Canada still needs its PhDs
The Globe and Mail
As the number of graduate students across North America skyrocketed over the past decade — with Ontario graduate enrollments alone doubling from about 10,000 to 20,000 — competition for the increasingly scarce full-time, tenure-stream faculty positions has become fierce. For example, in 2007 Canadian universities granted nearly 5,000 PhDs and another 6,000 recent PhDs were conducting postdoctoral research; but that year, only about 2,600 new full-time faculty members were hired at Canadian universities.

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40 per cent of all new jobs in Canada last year generated in Edmonton
Global News
Alberta's Capital City continues to be Canada's employment powerhouse. There are more jobs being created here than any other Canadian city. The City of Edmonton's chief economist says 80 per cent of new net jobs in Canada in the last year came from Alberta. "Over the past 12 months, Alberta has generated more new jobs than any other province in Canada and that includes Ontario, which is five times as large as we are," said John Rose.

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Too few university jobs for America's young scientists
WVXU
Imagine a job where about half of all the work is being done by people who are in training. That's, in fact, what happens in the world of biological and medical research. In the United States, more than 40,000 temporary employees known as postdoctoral research fellows are doing science at a bargain price. And most postdocs are being trained for jobs that don't actually exist. Academic institutions graduate an overabundance of biomedical Ph.D.s — and this imbalance is only getting worse, as research funding from the National Institutes of Health continues to wither.

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Chemistry careers from multiple angles
Science Careers
Unemployment among chemists, which rose sharply in the wake of the financial collapse, is nearly down to pre-Great Recession levels, reports Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), using data from the American Chemical Society's (ACS's) latest annual employment survey. What's more, "the drop in unemployment isn't solely related to people taking part-time or postdoctoral work," notes Steven Meyers, assistant director of the ACS career and professional advancement department, in the article.
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Do's and don'ts of using social media in your job search
Network World
With the economy improving, IT jobs are becoming more plentiful. And that means tech professionals – even those who are happily employed — are looking around to see what's available out there in the job market. According to a recent survey from TEKsystems, eight out of 10 IT pros say they are interested in new job opportunities. And 75 per cent of respondents said they use social media to look for jobs and check out potential new employers.
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Study: Age, not gender, is the new income divide in Canada
Financial Post
Age, not gender, is increasingly at the heart of income inequality in Canada, says a new study that warns economic growth and social stability will be at risk if companies don't start paying better wages. The Conference Board of Canada findings suggest younger workers in Canada are making less money relative to their elders regardless of whether they're male or female, individuals or couples, and both before and after tax.
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Ottawa and Nunavut sign job training grant agreement
Nunatsiaq Online
Nunavummiut who want to find work but need to upgrade their skills will get some financial help from Ottawa soon, so long as they can find an employer who's also willing to contribute. The federal government announced that Nunavut will get $1 million through the Canada Job Fund. That amounts to Nunavut's per capita share of the $500 million national fund. Because of its tiny population, Nunavut will also get a supplemental $500,000 "to recognize the distinct labour market needs of the territory," a press release said.
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Business reviews now available on the Chemical and Chemical Engineering Resource Guide
MultiView
Nearly seven out of 10 people read online reviews before making a purchase, and in the business-to-business world, reviews are even more important in the decision-making process. To help in your purchasing decisions, we are pleased to announce that we've now incorporated business reviews into our Chemical and Chemical Engineering Resource Guide. Now you have the opportunity to share your experiences with a company's products or services with your fellow colleagues, or read what others have to say about a potential future vendor. We are building a valuable resource for the chemical industry, but need your help to get it started. Visit the Chemical and Chemical Engineering Resource Guide to search for qualified product and service providers and write a review.


 
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