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Quick Links:    Learning Centre Home   CIC Home    About CIC    Conferences   Read Our Magazine November 26, 2014
 


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 CIC Live Learning Centre


Fresh Water Mussels as Bioindicators: Speciation Changes in Anodonta Kennerlyi Exposed to Mine Impacted Sediments within the Quinsam Watershed, Vancouver Island
William R. Cullen
Over 50 organoarsenicals have now been identified from a wide range of biological compartments. The toxicity of these species is very dependent on their structure and oxidation state. Some are more toxic than their inorganic precursors, especially methylarsonous acid which is implicated as a cause of human disease, especially cancer. The principal arsenic species in methanol/water extracts of the fresh water mussel Anodonta kennerlyi that is found in most Lakes in the Quinsam Watershed, Vancouver Island, are two dimethyl-oxoarsenosugars along with smaller amounts of their thio-analogues.
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A Quantitative Assessment of Back Donation and its Electronic Effects on Metal Complexes
A.B.P. Lever
Back donation is an important concept in inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Despite its long history, it tends to be used in a very qualitative fashion with comments such as "carbon monoxide is a better p-acceptor than pyridine." True, but how much better? We will discuss a systematic quantitative assessment of this idea, applicable to a wide range of complexes. Related topics such as changes in bond orders and distances, binding energies, Natural Population Analysis charges etc, associated with back donation, are also included.
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 Society News


It's Chemistry, Eh?! YouTube Contest submissions due Friday
CIC
Do you know a high school student interested in chemistry? A 3-minute video could win them $500 in the It's Chemistry, Eh?! YouTube Contest. Suggested topics include the benefits of chemistry in everyday life, contributions of a recognized chemist and busting a commonly held myth about chemistry. All entries must be submitted by midnight on November 28, 2014.
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Renew your membership
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Renew your membership for 2015 to continue taking advantage of the many benefits membership has to offer. Current members can renew by visiting the Member Login Site and new or lapsed members can join by completing the Application for Membership.
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 Career News


10 tips to accelerate your engineering career
EDN Network
There are times over the course of an engineer's career where it can feel like the rate of moving forward comes to a slow crawl or worse a stand still. This period of slow career growth can strike at any time whether the engineer is green and entry level or a seasoned senior professional. There are many different causes for a stagnating career ranging from being stuck on report duty, working at a company with limited upward mobility or even faltering motivation.
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Money, jobs and a flood of young adults moving to Western Canada
Troy Media
If you're young or have very little education, where's the best place in the country for you to find a job and make ad ecent income? Alberta, of course, followed by Saskatchewan and British Columbia. While most Canadians likely already suspect that economic opportunities are increasingly available in Western Canada, the hard numbers reveal stunning, positive facts about the opportunities for the young adult "career class" in the three Western-most provinces.
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Canada's job market growth spurt gives youths a chance to exit parents' basement
The Vancouver Sun
Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz angered many young job seekers by suggesting those still living in their parents' basements should consider unpaid work. The good news is, they may not have to. Young people are on pace for the biggest annual jobs increase since 2002, Statistics Canada data show. In September and October, employment in the youth category — 15 years old to 24 years old — increased by a combined 47,400, the second- highest two-month total since 2006 and about 40 per cent of the total 117,200 net new jobs across all categories.

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'Paid to learn': Facing skills shortage, manufacturers invest in training youth
The Globe and Mail
Young people may be wrestling with a tough jobs market, but the news isn't all glum: Some employers are experimenting with new ways to hire, train and invest in them. A cluster of Canadian manufacturers has banded together to tap young workers — even if they have no experience — for highly skilled, specialized positions. The employers have been spurred into action by strong demand, a shortage of people entering skilled trades and looming retirements.

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Number of engineering apprentices falling
Engineering & Technology Magazine
The number of people starting engineering apprenticeships has declined by 9 per cent over the past three years, according to an industry accountancy firm. Referring to data from the governmental Skills Funding Agency, SJD Accountancy said that only 63,240 people started engineering apprenticeships in 2013/2014, which is 490 less than in 2011/2012.

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Temporary work and no benefits: The growing workplace chasm
The Globe and Mail
There are worse things than unpaid internships for young adults. Like temporary work, for example. Short-term contracts and casual or seasonal jobs put people at a big disadvantage to those with full-time work. You often get paid less in salary, but that understates the problem because full-time workers typically receive a wide range of benefits that are typically unavailable to temporary staff.
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Statistics Canada had to scramble to fix, explain error in jobs data
The Wall Street Journal
Canada's statistical agency was made aware of a problem with the country's July jobs report in the days after its release and had to scramble to correct and explain the error, according to documents viewed by The Wall Street Journal. Statistics Canada was forced to retract the closely watched data days after it was issued, in an unusual and embarrassing move that prompted questions about the reliability of the federal agency's data collection.
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Business reviews now available on the Chemical and Chemical Engineering Resource Guide
MultiView
Nearly seven out of 10 people read online reviews before making a purchase, and in the business-to-business world, reviews are even more important in the decision-making process. To help in your purchasing decisions, we are pleased to announce that we've now incorporated business reviews into our Chemical and Chemical Engineering Resource Guide. Now you have the opportunity to share your experiences with a company's products or services with your fellow colleagues, or read what others have to say about a potential future vendor. We are building a valuable resource for the chemical industry, but need your help to get it started. Visit the Chemical and Chemical Engineering Resource Guide to search for qualified product and service providers and write a review.


 
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