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Text Version   RSS   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit April 15, 2014

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Table of Contents
  • HR and EAPs: From safety net to safe haven for victims
  • Global survey: China employers promote health in the workplace
  • Researchers link social media to increased levels of depression
  • EAPA offers online Critical Incident Response best practice overview
  • Gender differences important when examining substance abuse patterns
  • Can workplace policies be enforced outside of work?
  • Stress forces 1 in 5 UK workers to take time off
  • Survey: Healthy work environment contributes to healthy outlook
  • Study: Civilians in war zones also suffer mental health problems
  • Study proposes new treatment method for alcohol problems
  • Association between exposure to work stressors and cognitive performance
  • Biomarkers show differences in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder

  • HR and EAPs: From safety net to safe haven for victims
    TalentCulture
    Although overall intimate partner violence in the workplace has declined somewhat, there's still much work to be done even in 2014. Human resources, security professionals, EAPs and workplace violence nonprofits have all made huge strides in working together to address intimate partner violence and workplace violence.
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    Global survey: China employers promote health in the workplace
    Business Wire
    In a special report prepared for the Global Healthy Workplace Awards and Summit, nearly half of China's employers surveyed say they promote health at the workplace, and 73 percent say they measure specific health outcomes. The preliminary findings, reflecting results from 1,000 employers worldwide, including more than 80 in China, were released recently as part of a pre-publication preview of results from the 2014 Buck Consultants' global survey, "Working Well: A Global Survey of Health Promotion and Workplace Wellness Strategies."
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    Researchers link social media to increased levels of depression
    BGR
    A new study conducted by two psychologists at the University of Innsbruck in Austria that finds spending time on Facebook can depress users' moods even if they has no particular reason to feel sad. The researchers say that social media such as Facebook and Twitter can make users feel as though they're wasting time much more than general Internet browsing.
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    EAPA offers online Critical Incident Response best practice overview
    Employee Assistance Professionals Association
    Providing onsite services to work organizations is an integral part of EAP services. Over the years events have demonstrated repeatedly the value of having highly trained EA professionals ready to provide leadership consultation and onsite crisis intervention designed to foster organizational and individual resilience. On Thursday, May 22, EAPA is offering an online introductory training webinar, taught by expert Robert Intveld, LCSW, designed to provide EA professionals and EAP affiliate providers an overview of EAP CIR, the clinical foundations to be learned and the type of crisis intervention skills required to be successful in providing EAP CIR.
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    Gender differences important when examining substance abuse patterns
    SAMHSA
    Of the 1.8 million admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities in 2011, about 609,000 were female and 1.2 million were male, according to a new report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.
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    Can workplace policies be enforced outside of work?
    HR.BLR
    Today, in the age of social media and smartphones, employers and employees have much greater visibility when they leave work – giving employers the ability (and desire) to monitor their workers after hours, and resulting in greater exposure and potential for harm to an employer’s reputation. But can employers monitor or discipline employees for policy violations that occur when an employee is off-duty and off-premises?
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    Stress forces 1 in 5 UK workers to take time off
    International Business Times
    The U.K.'s economic recovery could be hindered by mental ill health as up to 1 in 5 workers have had to take time off due to a stress-related illness over the last year. According to research from MetLife Employee Benefits, which questioned more than 2,000 people, on average employees who have taken time off for stress have been absent for five days but nearly 1 in 10 employees have had to take more than six days off work through stress.
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    Survey: Healthy work environment contributes to healthy outlook
    Business Management
    The Consumer Health Mindset study — conducted for Aon Hewitt and the National Business Group on Health — found that most employees believe that workplace wellness programs help them achieve better health, make them feel better about their employers and are a good business investment. Yet half of employees who participated in The Consumer Health Mindset study said their organizations only do a so-so job of encouraging healthy employee behaviors, and 19 percent said their employees have never given the staff's health and wellness a thought.
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    Study: Civilians in war zones also suffer mental health problems
    HealthDay News
    Mental health problems are common among civilians who work for the U.S. military in war zones, a new study finds. Among the war zone-based civilian workers in the study, one-third said they felt their lives were threatened a few times a month, through events such as rocket or mortar attacks on military bases and the threat of improvised explosive devices.
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    Study proposes new treatment method for alcohol problems
    University of Buffalo via Medical Xpress
    A study published by the University at Buffalo Research Institute on Addictions suggests a new approach to help certain people stop drinking, instead of cognitive behavior therapy. A study by Paul Stasiewicz, a senior research scientist, developed and tested a new treatment he calls "affect regulation training," developed to supplement the standard CBT program for those people whose drinking is strongly tied to negative emotions.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        Simple test may be predictive of addiction treatment success (Virginia Tech University via WSLS-TV)
    Stanford professor: Toxic workplaces override wellness efforts (Employee Benefit News)
    Phone attachment linked with mental health stress (Science Network WA via Medical Xpress)
    Evidence-based resiliency programs adapted to help military families (American Psychological Association)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


    Association between exposure to work stressors and cognitive performance
    Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
    A study was undertaken to examine the association between work stress and cognitive performance. The association found between job strain and speed of memory retrieval might be one important factor explaining the effect of stress on work performance.
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    Biomarkers show differences in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder
    FirstWord MedTech
    Potential biomarkers may be predict development of post-traumatic stress disorder, according to a study presented recently. Many patients are exposed to trauma such as interpersonal violence, assault, or a gunshot wound, but only a subset of patients develop PTSD after their trauma, said Heather Grinstead, BS, Research Specialist, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta.
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