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Table of Contents
  • Suicide risk factors mapped
  • EAPA introduces free 2013 Conference App
  • Treatments of physical and mental health are coming together
  • Challenge 2013: Linking employee wellness, morale and the bottom line
  • Canadian employers bound to address workplace health
  • Addressing Australia's 'mental health day' stigma
  • Scots consider computers vs. counselors
  • Research: Mental health services inadequate for survivors of intimate partner violence
  • Could brain scans reveal the right treatment for depression?
  • Anxiety often plagues cancer survivors and their loved ones
  • Job insecurity: The real issue in the workplace
  • How employers should manage workplace stress
  • Pent-up stress may harm health of middle-aged women

  • Suicide risk factors mapped
    Lund University via Science Codex
    A landmark study of the Swedish population has given a clearer picture of important risk factors for suicide. Because the study, a collaboration between Lund University in Sweden and Stanford University, covered a range of different diseases in both in-patient and outpatient care as well as social factors, the researchers gained insight into which factors are particularly important to bear in mind when assessing the risk of suicide.
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    EAPA introduces free 2013 Conference App
    Employee Assistance Professionals Association
    The 2013 World EAP Conference App puts important conference resources at your fingertips so you're always in touch and informed. The app provides an updated conference schedule, speaker, sponsor and exhibitor directories, maps to sessions and exhibit hall and the conference Twitter feed. The app is free and personalized and allows you to: select the sessions/events you want to attend, identify the exhibitors you want to visit and locate them on the interactive EAPA Marketplace map, list sessions by domain and level of experience, complete session evaluations, and customize your contact information and share it with your fellow attendees. Downloading the conference app is a snap.
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    Treatments of physical and mental health are coming together
    Los Angeles Times
    As the nation seeks to extend healthcare coverage to millions of new and in many cases chronically ill patients, one of the great parallel challenges to controlling costs and improving delivery of care will be managing the mental health problems of people. Officials expect many newly insured patients arriving at doctor's offices and urban and rural clinics to have mental health complications. Beginning next year, some 2.3 million additional people may require mental health services through Medicaid, the public health insurance program for the poor, according to a study published in the American Journal of Psychiatry.
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    Challenge 2013: Linking employee wellness, morale and the bottom line
    Forbes
    As the work-life balance debate roars on with employees wondering whether to lean-in or lean-out these days, perception is everything. And the perception of being cared for in a workplace culture that encourages wellness, just might boast a more committed and happy workforce in the new world of work which is arguably high-tech, global and 24/7.
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    Canadian employers bound to address workplace health
    Benefits Canada
    A psychologically healthy workplace is defined as one that seeks to prevent harm to employee psychological health — including in negligent, reckless or intentional ways — and promotes psychological well-being. "While today we are talking about a voluntary standard, I'm personally of the view that it will become a legislative standard," Krista Hiddema, co-founder of e2r Solutions, said recently in Toronto.
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    Addressing Australia's 'mental health day' stigma
    Human Capital
    Mental health issues will be experienced by 45 percent of adult Australians, with 25 percent experiencing anxiety. Despite these figures, mental health continues to be ignored by both employees and employers alike. Michele Grow, CEO of Davidson Trahaire Corpsych, stated that placing emphasis on "mental health days" as separate from "sick days" has stigmatized the need for employees to recharge their minds.
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    Scots consider computers vs. counselors
    Illawarra Mercury
    Can a computer treat depression? Scottish health policy creators are willing to find out. With the costs of mental health treatment continuing to skyrocket and in many western countries, new approaches are being sought. One option is the use of computer-based programs to assist others to challenge irrational thoughts and become more positive thinkers.
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    Research: Mental health services inadequate for survivors of intimate partner violence
    Medical News Today
    Although many abused women suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder and/or depression, they are not receiving needed mental health services, a University of Missouri researcher found. "More than half of the women participating in our study suffered from depression, PTSD or both illnesses," said Mansoo Yu, an assistant professor of social work in the College of Human Environmental Sciences. "However, most of the survivors had not used mental health services in the past year, even though they reported having access to the services."
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    Could brain scans reveal the right treatment for depression?
    NPR
    Scientists are trying to better the odds by searching for signals in the body or in behavior that could be signposts to the right treatment. Researchers at Emory University say that PET scans of the brain may help predict which people do better on SSRI antidepressants, and which would benefit most from cognitive behavioral therapy instead.
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    Anxiety often plagues cancer survivors and their loved ones
    HealthDay News
    Cancer survivors and their partners have an increased long-term risk of anxiety but not depression, researchers have found. For the new study, investigators found that levels of depression were similar among adults without cancer and adult cancer survivors two or more years after diagnosis. However, cancer survivors were 27 percent more likely to report anxiety two or more years after their diagnosis and 50 percent more likely to experience anxiety 10 or more years after diagnosis.
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    TRENDING ARTICLES
    Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

        Study details which exercises fight depression (American Medical News)
    Military service member offspring at higher risk of mental issues (Science World Report)
    Stress leave a rising source of contention for employers (The Denver Post)
    Judging the impact of workplace productivity (Human Resource Executive Online)

    Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


    Job insecurity: The real issue in the workplace
    Delaware County News Network
    Job insecurity is pretty intuitive; it is worry resulting from questionable safety and continuity of the present employment, and a perceived uncertainty about the ongoing continuity of current employment. But it's not only job loss that strikes fear into the hearts of the masses; it's also job change.
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    How employers should manage workplace stress
    Employee Benefits
    There are countless legal cases illustrating the perils of employers overlooking workplace stress. But not much appears to have changed since these cases, which is remarkable given the increased pressure the economic downturn has put on employees across all market sectors. Employee Benefits Healthcare research, published this month, reveals that just 46 percent of respondents have strategies in place to combat workplace stress.
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    Pent-up stress may harm health of middle-aged women
    HealthDay via WebMD
    Many middle-aged women develop aches and pains and other physical symptoms as a result of chronic stress, according to a decades-long study. Among those who reported long-term stress, 40 percent said they suffered aches and pains in their muscles and joints, 28 percent experienced headaches or migraines and 28 percent reported gastrointestinal problems, according to the researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy of the University of Gothenburg.
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