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Mars once had water to host life
Business Standard
A team of researchers has found what may once have been the most livable mud on the Red Planet. Some of the oldest minerals ever analyzed by NASA's Mars Opportunity Rover show that around four billion years ago the Red Planet had liquid water which was so fresh that it could have supported life.
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SOCIETY NEWS


Goldschmidt2014: Field trips
GS
Field trip organizers for the Goldschmidt2014 conference are putting together several not-to-be missed experiences both before and after the conference. Be sure to check out the current offerings, including one-day trips to the Sierra Nevada, the Monterey Formation, or a Taste of the Terroir of the Napa Valley, to longer trips such as the four-day trip "Silicic Magmatism: Plutonism in Yosemite National Park and Volcanism in Long Valley Caldera."
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Goldschmidt2014: Travel grants
GS
A limited amount of financial support will be available to students as well as to delegates from low-economy countries that are presenting their research at the Goldschmidt2014 conference in Sacramento. Applications for support (including a letter of recommendation from an advisor or peer) are due by Saturday, Feb. 8 at 11:59 p.m. CST. For more information and to apply for support please visit the Goldschmidt Conference Grants page.
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Early renewal discount ends soon
GS
2014 memberships processed by Jan. 31, receive a $5 discount (Professional US$ 30, Student US$ 10, and Senior US$ 15). Anyone may subscribe to GNews for free, so if you are wondering if your GS membership is up to date, we have an easy and secure way to check online. Our member login will let you view your member status and account information. If you are new you can simply click the 'join' button and complete a member form. Once members log in a sidebar provides options to add another year of membership, purchase publications/subscriptions, make donations or submit a change of address. Members who have forgotten their number, may also use a link to recover it using your email address. Registration for Goldschmidt2014 is also right around the corner, so be sure to keep current!
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Geochemical Career Center
GS


New! Tenure-Track Faculty Position in Radiogenic Isotope Geochemistry (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA)



Post Doc position for laser ablation geochronologist or thermochronologist (University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada)



Director, Romberg Tiburon Center for Environmental Studies (San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA, USA)



Professor of Geochemistry and Economic Geology (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany)



Graduate student opportunities in environmental, analytical and exploration geochemistry (MAGNET, various locations, Canada)



International research chair in stable isotope biogeochemistry / paleoceanography (LabexMER, Brest/Dinard, France)



Final Days! Scripps Institution of Oceanography Postdoctoral Position (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, USA)

Job Seekers: View current openings | Post your resume | Career resources

Employers: All jobs posted in the Geochemical Career Center are cross-promoted through Facebook, Twitter and right here in Geochemical News.

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New in GCA (v.125, 15 January 2014)
GS
Partitioning of copper between olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, spinel, garnet and silicate melts at upper mantle conditions

No Martian soil component in shergottite meteorites

Contrasts in variations of the carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of travertines formed in pools and a ramp stream at Huanglong Ravine, China: Implications for paleoclimatic interpretations

Equations for calculating hydrogeochemical reactions of minerals and gases such as CO2 at high pressures and temperatures

224Ra:228Th disequilibrium in coastal sediments: Implications for solute transfer across the sediment–water interface

Mechanistic insights into the formation of chloroform from natural organic matter using stable carbon isotope analysis

A new method of reconstituting the P–T conditions of fluid circulation in an accretionary prism (Shimanto, Japan) from microthermometry of methane-bearing aqueous inclusions

Magnesium retention on the soil exchange complex controlling Mg isotope variations in soils, soil solutions and vegetation in volcanic soils, Iceland

Lithium systematics in howardite–eucrite–diogenite meteorites: Implications for crust–mantle evolution of planetary embryos

The sources and time-integrated evolution of diamond-forming fluids – Trace elements and isotopic evidence

Probing silicon and aluminium chemical environments in silicate and aluminosilicate glasses by solid state NMR spectroscopy and accurate first-principles calculations

Stable bromine isotopic composition of methyl bromide released from plant matter

Rutile solubility in hydrous rhyolite melts at 750–900 °C and 2 kbar, with application to titanium-in-quartz (TitaniQ) thermobarometry

Thermodynamic mixing properties and behavior of almandine–spessartine solid solutions

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LATEST NEWS


Southern Alps being pushed up 'shockingly' fast
The New Zealand Herald
New Zealand's Southern Alps are being pushed up by tectonic forces "shockingly" faster than any mountains in the world, in new international findings that have wide ramifications for the Earth's entire carbon cycle. New measurements from the steep mountain tops have shown that rock can transform into soil more than twice as fast as previously believed possible, according to a major study published in leading journal Science.
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What massive icebergs tell us about Earth's chilly past
Texas A&M University via Futurity
During the last ice age, giant icebergs broke off from glaciers and surged into the North Atlantic. Called Heinrich events, these surges were previously thought to have weakened the global ocean conveyor belt and sent Earth's climate into a deep freeze. A new study suggests that these events may have been caused by changes in atmospheric circulation patterns.
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Water discovered on dwarf planet Ceres, may erupt from ice volcanoes
The Weather Channel
Astronomers have discovered direct evidence of water on the dwarf planet Ceres in the form of vapor plumes erupting into space, possibly from volcano-like ice geysers on its surface. Using European Space Agency's Herschel Space Observatory, scientists detected water vapor escaping from two regions on Ceres, a dwarf planet that is also the largest asteroid in the solar system. The water is likely erupting from icy volcanoes or sublimation of ice into clouds of vapor.
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Changing climate: How dust changed the face of Earth
ScienceDaily
In spring 2010, the research icebreaker Polarstern returned from the South Pacific with a scientific treasure — ocean sediments from a previously almost unexplored part of the South Polar Sea. What looks like an inconspicuous sample of mud to a layman is, to geological history researchers, a valuable archive from which they can reconstruct the climatic history of the polar areas over many years of analysis. This, in turn, is of fundamental importance for understanding global climatic development.
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NASA receives Mars 2020 Rover Instrument proposals for evaluation
NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
NASA has received 58 proposals for science and exploration technology instruments to fly aboard the agency's next Mars rover in 2020, twice the usual number submitted for instrument competitions in the recent past, and an indicator of the extraordinary interest in exploration of the Red Planet. The agency is beginning a thorough review to determine the best combination of science and exploration technology investigations for the mission and anticipates making final selections in the next five months.
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Call for GSA Penrose Medal nominations
GSA
The Penrose Medal of the Geological Society of America is one of GSA's highest honors, awarded in "recognition of eminent research in pure geology, for outstanding original contributions or achievements that mark a major advance in the science of geology". On behalf of the Penrose Committee, please consider nominating deserving candidates. Nominations for awards presented by the GSA are due Feb. 1. Visit the GSA Nominations page for award criteria, and an easy online nomination form.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Megafloods: What they leave behind (ScienceDaily)
UCR researchers: World's oldeset diamonds are fake (Highlander)
Early start for plate tectonics (Chemistry World)
Large landmasses existed 2.7 billion years ago (ScienceDaily)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

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