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Harry Hess Postdoctoral Research Associate in Geosciences

The Department of Geosciences at Princeton University is accepting applications for a Postdoctoral Research Associate










 



Surprising quantity of carbon discovered in deep, dark Earth
AZoM
Probing the secrets of volcanoes and diamonds, sources of gas and oil, and the origins of life itself, Deep Carbon Observatory scientists publish landmark volume 3 years into historic 10-year, $500 million global collaboration.
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SOCIETY NEWS


RIMG #75: Carbon in Earth released as an open access publication
GS
Carbon in Earth is a product of the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO), a 10-year international research effort dedicated to achieving transformational understanding of the chemical and biological roles of carbon in Earth. The book integrates a vast body of knowledge and research in physics, chemistry, biology and Earth and space sciences about carbon. A small fraction of Earth's carbon is in its atmosphere, seawater and top crusts. An estimated 90 percent or more is locked away or in motion deep underground - a hidden dimension of the planet as poorly understood as it is profoundly important to life on the surface. Each chapter synthesizes what we know about this deep carbon, and also outlines unanswered questions that will guide the DCO's research for the remainder of the decade and beyond. A hallmark of the DCO is the desire to implement advanced strategies in communications, data management, engagement, and visualization. Accordingly, this volume incorporates some novel aspects of animations and videos. Thanks to sponsorship by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, which provides significant support for the DCO, this is the first of the RIMG series to be published as an Open Access volume. Print copies are also available for purchase for US$ 40.00. Geochemical Society members receive a 25 percent discount on RIMG orders.
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Geochemical Career Center Postings
GS
All jobs posted in the Geochemical Career Center are cross-promoted through our Facebook page and right here in Geochemical News.


Maersk Oil Chair in Applied Geophysics (Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark)




Organic Geochemist (ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company, Annandale, NJ, USA)



Postdoctoral opportunities in applied geochemistry research (Multidisciplinary Applied Geochemistry Network, Canada)



Postdoctoral position: FT-ICR mass spectrometry and IR laser spectroscopy of ion clusters (Hong Kong University, Hong Kong, China)


Job Seekers: View current openings | Post your resume | Career resources

Employers: Post jobs | Search resumes | Employer resources

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New in GCA (v.105, 15 March 2013)
GS
Abundance, size distributions and trace-element binding of organic and iron-rich nanocolloids in Alaskan rivers, as revealed by field-flow fractionation and ICP-MS

Sr/Ca sensitivity to aragonite saturation state in cultured subsamples from a single colony of coral: Mechanism of biomineralization during ocean acidification

Martian fluid and Martian weathering signatures identified in Nakhla, NWA 998 and MIL 03346 by halogen and noble gas analysis

Effects of a short-term experimental microclimate warming on the abundance and distribution of branched GDGTs in a French peatland

Surface and mineral structure of ferrihydrite

Scale-dependent rates of uranyl surface complexation reaction in sediments

Isotopic and hydrologic responses of small, closed lakes to climate variability: Hydroclimate reconstructions from lake sediment oxygen isotope records and mass balance models

The difference of diffusion coefficients in water for arsenic compounds at various pH and its dominant factors implied by molecular simulations

Calcium, magnesium and strontium cycling in stratified, hardwater lakes: Lake Kinneret (Sea of Galilee), Israel

The quest for regolithic howardites. Part 1: Two trends uncovered using noble gases

Isotope fractionation during nitrogen remineralization (ammonification): Implications for nitrogen isotope biogeochemistry

Reconstructing Late Ordovician carbon cycle variations

Isotopic and hydrologic responses of small, closed lakes to climate variability: Comparison of measured and modeled lake level and sediment core oxygen isotope records

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LATEST NEWS


The death of the Chebarkul meteor
Nature
The city of Chelyabinsk was once a secret Soviet weapons center, then a poor Siberian backwater. But a few minutes after sunrise on Feb. 15, the largest meteor blast in more than 100 years lifted the region from obscurity. Since then, scientists have been scrutinizing fragments of the meteorite and studying videos of its final moments to pin down its origin and how it got to Earth.
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Earth not so hot thanks to volcanoes
Science
Global average temperatures have been rising in recent years, but not as much as they might have, thanks to a series of small-to-moderate-sized volcanic eruptions that have spewed sunlight-blocking particles high into the atmosphere. That's the conclusion of a new study, which also finds that microscopic particles derived from industrial smokestacks have done little to cool the globe.
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Forests as rainmakers: New study lends credence to theory
The Energy Collective
It seems intuitive that large forests exist in areas where there is a lot of rainfall. But what if the converse were true? What if forests themselves were a significant factor in causing rainfall?
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Europa's epsom salt may indicate ocean life
Discovery News
If you've ever found yourself wanting to know if there's extraterrestrial life on Europa, this latest study into the Jovian moon's icy crust should whet your appetite. Using data from the powerful Keck II Telescope atop Mauna Kea in Hawai'i, astronomers Mike Brown, of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), and Kevin Hand, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), have found strong evidence that suggests chemicals from Europa's sub-surface ocean are leaking to the surface. In turn, chemicals from the surface are likely cycling into the ocean too. The research has been published in the Astrophysical Journal.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Dust from Africa affects snowfall in California (Newsday)
Fracking wastewater can be highly radioactive (Herald-Standard)
Researchers find new information about 'Snowball Earth' period (ScienceDaily)
Study: Magma once covered Mercury (Space.com via NBC News)


 

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