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Harry Hess Postdoctoral Research Associate in Geosciences

The Department of Geosciences at Princeton University is accepting applications for a Postdoctoral Research Associate










 

Discovery of 1,800-year-old 'Rosetta Stone' for tropical ice cores
ScienceDaily
Two annually dated ice cores drawn from the tropical Peruvian Andes reveal Earth's tropical climate history in unprecedented detail — year by year, for nearly 1,800 years. Researchers at The Ohio State University retrieved the cores from a Peruvian ice cap in 2003, and then noticed some startling similarities to other ice cores that they had retrieved from Tibet and the Himalayas. Patterns in the chemical composition of certain layers matched up, even though the cores were taken from opposite sides of the planet.
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SOCIETY NEWS


Goldschmidt13 deadlines this Friday
GS
This is a final reminder that the deadlines for abstract submissions, field trip bookings, and travel grants are this Friday (April 12). Be sure to book accommodations early, as well as make plans for interesting workshops, social events and tours. A Letter of Invitation is also available to assist with funding or visa applications. Early registration for members is 490 Euro for delegates and 295 Euro for students. Please encourage your colleagues and students who plan to attend Goldschmidt2013 and are not members of one of the sponsoring societies (GS, EAG, GSJ) to join first, so that they may qualify for the member rate.
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GS Membership Surpasses Milestone
GS
This week, thanks to over 3,800 new and returning members, the Society's 2013 membership has surpassed the previous membership record of 3,793 reached last year. As an international scientific association it is wonderful to see membership in more than 60 countries and as well as a large percentage of students. Thank you for your support in the Society and our programs. The figures show the membership's current composition. The left graphic is membership by type (75.4 percent Professional, 20.4 percent Student, and 4.2 percent Senior) and right graphic is membership by continent (1 percent Africa, 11 percent Asia, 27 percent Europe, 53 percent North America, 7 percent Oceania, and 2 percent South America)
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Geochemical Career Center
GS
All jobs posted in the Geochemical Career Center are cross-promoted through our Facebook page and right here in Geochemical News.


Associate professor in metamorphic petrology/ structural geology (Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark)




Maersk Oil Chair in Applied Geophysics (Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark)




Postdoctoral position: FT-ICR mass spectrometry and IR laser spectroscopy of ion clusters (Hong Kong University, Hong Kong, China)


Job Seekers: View current openings | Post your resume | Career resources

Employers: Post jobs | Search resumes | Employer resources

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New in GCA (v.108, 1 May 2013)
GS
New constraints on the formation of shergottite Elephant Moraine 79001 lithology A

Partial re-equilibration of highly siderophile elements and the chalcogens in the mantle: A case study on the Baldissero and Balmuccia peridotite massifs (Ivrea Zone, Italian Alps)

Compositional and petrographic similarities of CV and CK chondrites: A single group with variations in textures and volatile concentrations attributable to impact heating, crushing and oxidation

Insights into early Earth from Barberton komatiites: Evidence from lithophile isotope and trace element systematics

Magnesite dissolution rates at different spatial scales: The role of mineral spatial distribution and flow velocity

Effects of temperature on rates and mineral products of microbial Fe(II) oxidation by Leptothrix cholodnii at microaerobic conditions

Calibration and application of the 'clumped isotope' thermometer to foraminifera for high-resolution climate reconstructions

Surface charge and growth of sulphate and carbonate green rust in aqueous media

Synchrotron-based P K-edge XANES spectroscopy reveals rapid changes of phosphorus speciation in the topsoil of two glacier foreland chronosequences

The solubility of palladium and ruthenium in picritic melts: 2. The effect of sulfur

Anaerobic methane oxidation in low-organic content methane seep sediments

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LATEST NEWS


Call for Kuno Award Nominations
AGU
The Hisashi Kuno Award is given by the VGP Section of AGU for outstanding contributions to the fields of Volcanology, Geochemistry or Petrology. The award is based on the quality of publications arising from work performed up to seven years past the receipt of the Ph.D. awardees must be members of AGU at the time of nomination and within seven years of the award of the Ph.D. on Jan 1 of the year of the award. Details of nominating procedures can be found at http://www.agu.org/sections/VGP/kuno.shtml. Deadline for nominations is May 1, 2013.
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Fall AGU session proposal deadline is April 19
AGU
Session proposals for the 2013 Fall AGU meeting are still being accepted through April 19. Proposals are limited to 800 characters and must have between two and four conveners. For further details visit the proposal guidelines page.
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A 'green' Sahara was far less dusty than today
MIT News Office
As recently as 5,000 years ago, the Sahara — today a vast desert in northern Africa, spanning more than 3.5 million square miles — was a verdant landscape, with sprawling vegetation and numerous lakes. Ancient cave paintings in the region depict hippos in watering holes, and roving herds of elephants and giraffes — a vibrant contrast with today’s barren, inhospitable terrain.
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Universe is older than previously thought, new study shows
Reuters
Closer scrutiny of radiation left over from the creation of the universe shows the Big Bang took place about 13.8 billion years ago, 100 million years earlier than previous estimates, scientists said. The findings are among the first results from analysis of data collected by the European Space Agency's Planck spacecraft, which is providing the most detailed look to date at the remnant microwave radiation that permeates the universe.
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Meteorites could have been source of life's batteries
NewScientist
The first life on Earth might have acquired its "batteries" from an alien source. Rocks that crashed to Earth could have supplied early organisms with essential molecules that allowed them to store energy, ensuring that they could go on to give rise to all terrestrial life we see today.
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Scientists to Jupiter's moon Io: Your volcanoes are in the wrong place
ScienceDaily
Jupiter's moon Io is the most volcanically active world in the Solar System, with hundreds of volcanoes, some erupting lava fountains up to 250 miles high. However, concentrations of volcanic activity are significantly displaced from where they are expected to be based on models that predict how the moon's interior is heated, according to NASA and European Space Agency researchers.
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Carbon-dioxide storage with less earthquake risk
MIT Technology Review
There is increasing concern that storing carbon dioxide in underground rock formations could cause earthquakes that would allow it to escape, raising doubt that the strategy could play its expected role in slowing the harmful accumulation of the greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. But new research suggests that storing carbon in one particular type of underground rock could significantly reduce the risk.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Scientists image deep magma beneath Pacific seafloor volcano (ScienceDaily)
Kansas was unbearably hot 270 million years ago (ScienceNews)
Huge and widespread volcanic eruptions triggered the end-Triassic extinction (MIT News Office)


 

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