This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Click here to advertise in this news brief.




  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Apr. 23, 2013

Home   Join   Goldschmidt 2013   Career Center   GN Archive










 

Probing secrets of Earth's plates
The New Zealand Herald
Scientists want to learn more about the tectonic surfaces we ride on and what happens at their boundaries. Scientists from across the world have come here to examine how to unlock secrets hidden within our offshore tectonic plate boundaries over the next decade, potentially resulting in multi-million dollar projects.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  





SOCIETY NEWS


Goldschmidt2013 attracts over 4,000 abstracts
GS
More than 4000 abstracts have been received, making Goldschmidt2013 the biggest geochemical conference ever! Please make sure you register before the June 25, 2013, early registration deadline, as well as book accommodations, and make plans for interesting workshops, social events and tours. A Letter of Invitation is also available to assist with funding or visa applications. Early registration for members is 490 Euro for delegates and 295 Euro for students. Please encourage your colleagues and students attending Goldschmidt2013 and are not members of one of the sponsoring societies (GS, EAG, GSJ) to join first, so that they may qualify for the member rate.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


Geochemical Society at 2013 GSA Annual Meeting
GS
Thanks to strong volunteer support, the Geochemical Society is sponsoring or co-sponsoring 33 topical sessions at this year's GSA Annual Meeting in Denver (Oct. 27-30). Abstract submission is now open and the deadline to submit your abstract is Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2013.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


Geochemical Career Center
GS
All jobs posted in the Geochemical Career Center are cross-promoted through our Facebook page and right here in Geochemical News.


Associate professor in metamorphic petrology/ structural geology (Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark)




Maersk Oil Chair in Applied Geophysics (Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark)




Final Days! Postdoctoral position: FT-ICR mass spectrometry and IR laser spectroscopy of ion clusters (Hong Kong University, Hong Kong, China)


Job Seekers: View current openings | Post your resume | Career resources

Employers: For a nominal fee (a single 60-day post is 250 USD), the link to your post will be distributed in future issues of Geochemical News – reaching over 5,100 subscribers and also on our Facebook page with over 1,800 likes.
Post jobs | Search resumes | Employer resources

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


New in GCA (v.109, 15 May 2013)
GS
Detection and characterization of uranium–humic complexes during 1D transport studies

LA-ICP-MS depth profile analysis of apatite: Protocol and implications for (U–Th)/He thermochronometry

Evidence that crude oil alkane activation proceeds by different mechanisms under sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions

The evolution of early diagenetic signals in Bering Sea subseafloor sediments in response to varying organic carbon deposition over the last 4.3 Ma

Reactivity of neodymium carriers in deep sea sediments: Implications for boundary exchange and paleoceanography

Geochemistry and geobiology of a present-day serpentinization site in California: The Cedars

Ikaite solubility in seawater-derived brines at 1 atm and sub-zero temperatures to 265 K

Climatic and diagenetic signals in the stable isotope geochemistry of dolomitic paleosols spanning the Paleocene–Eocene boundary

Stibiconite (Sb3O6OH), senarmontite (Sb2O3) and valentinite (Sb2O3): Dissolution rates at pH 2–11 and isoelectric points

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


LATEST NEWS


Where does charcoal, or black carbon, in soils go?
National Science Foundation
Scientists have uncovered one of nature's long-kept secrets — the true fate of charcoal in the world's soils. The ability to determine the fate of charcoal is critical to knowledge of the global carbon budget, which in turn can help understand and mitigate climate change.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Elusive atmospheric intermediates reveal some secrets
Chemistry World
Scientists have found further evidence for the existence of an elusive intermediate implicated in chemical reactions that degrade atmospheric pollutants. A new method of directly detecting the simplest form of this intermediate, as well as more measurements of the intermediate's reactivity, provide indications that atmospheric models need to improve how they account for them.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


New technique could yield gold from crop plants
Counsel & Heal
An international team of scientists have found a way to grow and harvest gold from crop plants. The technique is called phytomining, using plants to extract particles of gold from the soil. Some plants are naturally able to take up and concentrate metals through their roots, such as nickel, camium, and zinc in their leaves and shoots. These plants have been coined as hyperaccumulators, which scientists have explored their use for pollution removal.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Analyzing ash flows from volcanic explosions
Physics World
Researchers in the U.S. have analyzed ash interactions from volcano plumes in a variety of conditions and identified two aggregation regimes – dry and wet – in which particle adhesion is controlled by electrostatic and hydrodynamic forces, respectively. This research – part of a larger investigation into the prediction of eruptive ash dispersal – may act to refine current models of volcanic-plume behavior.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Cutting specific pollutants would slow sea level rise
Environmental Research Web
With coastal areas bracing for rising sea levels, new research indicates that cutting emissions of certain pollutants can greatly slow down sea level rise this century. The research team found that reductions in four pollutants that cycle comparatively quickly through the atmosphere could slow the annual rate of sea level rise by roughly 25 to 50 percent.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    High salt levels in Saharan groundwater endanger oases farming (ScienceDaily)
Modeling the Yellowstone magma plume with a vat of sugar water (Ars Technica)
Volcano event lines up with pre-dino die-offs (Futurity)
Islands in the rain (MIT News Office)
Iceland volcano ash cloud triggers plankton bloom (BBC News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

Geochemical News
Geochemical Society Content Editors: Martin Elsner, Shuhei Ono,
Lesley Warren, and Helen Williams   
Contribute news


For MultiBriefs:
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Tammy Gibson, Content Editor, 469.420.2677   
Contribute news

This edition of Geochemical News was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent Issues
April 23, 2013
April 16, 2013
April 9, 2013
April 2, 2013



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063