This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Click here to advertise in this news brief.




  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit May. 21, 2013

Home   Join   Goldschmidt 2013   Career Center   GN Archive













 

Billion-year-old water could hold clues to life on Earth and Mars
ScienceDaily
A U.K.-Canadian team of scientists has discovered ancient pockets of water, which have been isolated deep underground for billions of years and contain abundant chemicals known to support life. This water could be some of the oldest on the planet and may even contain life. Not just that, but the similarity between the rocks that trapped it and those on Mars raises the hope that comparable life-sustaining water could lie buried beneath the Red Planet's surface.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Visit the Geosciences Knowledge Library

For decades Thermo Fisher Scientific has worked with Geoscientists helping to achieve a greater understanding of the earth and our planets. The data provided from the innovative technologies has been documented in a wide variety of literature. This knowledge is now accessible on www.thermoscientific.com/geoscience. Learn more about instruments and applications for the analysis of elements and isotopes.
 


SOCIETY NEWS


GS and EAG announce inaugural outreach program lectures
GS
Bernhard Wehrli of ETH Zürich is the first lecturer in the GS-EAG Outreach Program. Pr. Wehrli will deliver lectures in Ethiopia and Madagascar in June and Cameroon, Ghana, and Kenya in September. The lectures span a range of topics of local and regional importance including water availability and quality for both drinking and agriculture and one entitled "In search of rare elements: mining for cell phones". The Societies wish Pr. Wehrli every success in his lecture tour.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


Geochemical Career Center
GS
New! Research Associate in Isotope Geochemistry (GFZ Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany)




Postdoctoral Research Associate - Geochemistry & Interfacial Sciences (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA)



Final Days! Maersk Oil Chair in Applied Geophysics (Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark)



Job Seekers: View current openings | Post your resume | Career resources

Employers: All jobs posted in the Geochemical Career Center are cross-promoted through our Facebook page and right here in Geochemical News. Through June 28, take 20 percent off all GCC packages.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


GCA Special Issue: Hydrogen Isotopes as Environmental Recorders
GS
This special issue (GCA v.111) focuses on the application of hydrogen isotope variation in both naturally occurring inorganic and organic substances as a means to understand past environmental conditions, particularly having to do with precipitation. Papers in the issue investigate mechanisms of hydrogen isotope fractionation ranging from uptake during rock weathering to a wide variety of biologically mediated fractionation processes.

Introduction: Hydrogen isotopes as environmental recorders

Experimental investigation of rates and mechanisms of isotope exchange (O, H) between volcanic ash and isotopically-labeled water

The effect of warming on grassland evapotranspiration partitioning using laser-based isotope monitoring techniques

Leaf water deuterium enrichment shapes leaf wax n-alkane δD values of angiosperm plants I: Experimental evidence and mechanistic insights

Leaf water deuterium enrichment shapes leaf wax n-alkane δD values of angiosperm plants II: Observational evidence and global implications

Environmental control on eastern broadleaf forest species' leaf wax distributions and D/H ratios

Reprint of "Stable hydrogen and carbon isotopic compositions of long-chain (C21–C33) n-alkanes and n-alkenes in insects"

Environmental, trophic, and ecological factors influencing bone collagen δ2H

Correlation between precipitation and geographical location of the δ2H values of the fatty acids in milk and bulk milk powder

Variable δD values among major biochemicals in plants: Implications for environmental studies

What does leaf wax δD from a mixed C3/C4 vegetation region tell us?

Environmental changes and the rise and fall of civilizations in the northern Horn of Africa: An approach combining δD analyses of land-plant derived fatty acids with multiple proxies in soil

Alkenone distribution impacts the hydrogen isotopic composition of the C37:2 and C37:3 alkan-2-ones in Emiliania huxleyi


Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


LATEST NEWS


World's melting glaciers making large contribution to sea rise
ScienceDaily
While 99 percent of Earth's land ice is locked up in the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, the remaining ice in the world's glaciers contributed just as much to sea rise as the two ice sheets combined from 2003 to 2009, says a new study led by Clark University and involving the University Colorado Boulder.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Spinning the core
ScienceNews
Daniel Lathrop spent seven years and $2 million building the stainless steel sphere in his laboratory. It's two spheres, actually — nestled one within the other like a pair of Russian dolls. Only these dolls contain 12 tons of molten metal and spin independently at astonishing speeds.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Atlantic coast warping like a 'magic carpet'
Science
Compared with western North America — mountainous, volcanic, and earthquake-prone — the geologically quiescent East Coast has earned the appellation "passive continental margin." But new geologic models show that Earth's churning interior warps and bends this and many other so-called stable areas.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


NASA greenlights University of Arizona-led mission to get bits of asteroid
Arizona Daily Star
NASA gave the all-systems-go signal for a University of Arizona-led mission to mine samples from a near-Earth asteroid named Bennu. The UA's OSIRIS-REx team has passed its design-and-development test. It can now move to building the capsule and instruments that will lift off in 2016 for a seven-year odyssey to the asteroid previously known by its sequential discovery code of 99RQ36.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Earth's great gift to the moon: Water (TIME)
An exploding star, a grain of sand, and an origin story (The New Yorker)
Mineral dust plays key role in cloud formation and chemistry (Chemistry World)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

Geochemical News
Geochemical Society Content Editors: Martin Elsner, Shuhei Ono,
Lesley Warren, and Helen Williams   
Contribute news


For MultiBriefs:
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Tammy Gibson, Content Editor, 469.420.2677   
Contribute news

This edition of Geochemical News was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent Issues
May 14, 2013
May 7, 2013
April 30, 2013
April 23, 2013



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063