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Deep freeze couldn't keep the Arctic current from flowing during the last ice age
redOrbit
When thick ice covered the Arctic during the last ice age, many scientists assumed that the deep currents below the ice that feed the North Atlantic Ocean and help drive the global ocean currents slowed or possibly even stopped. A new study reveals that the deep Arctic Ocean has been churning briskly for the last 35,000 years, through the chill of the last ice age and warmth of modern times.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Visit the Geosciences Knowledge Library

For decades Thermo Fisher Scientific has worked with Geoscientists helping to achieve a greater understanding of the earth and our planets. The data provided from the innovative technologies has been documented in a wide variety of literature. This knowledge is now accessible on www.thermoscientific.com/geoscience. Learn more about instruments and applications for the analysis of elements and isotopes.
 


SOCIETY NEWS


Goldschmidt2013 Program now available
GS
Goldschmidt2013 program details (with talk and poster times) are now available, and delegates have been emailed the details of their presentations. Thank you to the hundreds who have already registered for what looks to be an exciting conference in Florence, Italy. If you haven't registered yet, please do so before the June 25 early registration deadline. GS, EAG and GSJ members are entitled to register at a member registration rate (Professional €490, Student €295 for early registration). Current GS members who have forgotten their member number may recover it with their email address.
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Carlson awarded Arthur L. Day Award
GS
The Geological Society of America has announced that Rick Carlson (Carnegie Institution of Washington) has been named the 2013 Arthur L. Day Medalist. The award recognizes his outstanding contributions to geologic knowledge through the application of physics and chemistry to the solution of geologic problems. The honor will be presented at the 2013 GSA Annual Meeting in Denver, CO, this October. Dr. Carlson is a 2003 Geochemical Fellow and is currently President of the Geochemical Society.
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Geochemical Society membership breaks 4,000
GS
As of the end of May, the membership of the Geochemical Society has broken the 4,000 mark for the first time in its history. This reflects nearly a doubling of the membership in the last five years. The Board and the many volunteers on Society committees look forward to serving the membership and providing the benefits that support the growth of geochemistry internationally.
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GS introduces life membership option
GS
Like being a GS member, but have trouble remembering to renew your membership ever year? The GS has introduced a life membership option for those who know they will be geochemists for life. Becoming a life member eliminates the hassle of yearly membership renewals and protects against potential future increases in Society membership fees. The current life membership rate is 70 minus your current age times $35 USD with a minimum rate of $175. To apply for life membership, login to your GS account, and select the Life Membership option on the left column.
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Geochemical Career Center
GS
PhD in Experimental Geochemistry





Research Associate in Isotope Geochemistry (GFZ Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany)






Postdoctoral Research Associate - Geochemistry & Interfacial Sciences (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA)


Job Seekers: View current openings | Post your resume | Career resources

Employers: All jobs posted in the Geochemical Career Center are cross-promoted through our Facebook page and right here in Geochemical News. Through June 28, take 20 percent off all GCC packages.

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New in GCA (v.112, 01 July 2013)
GS
Position-specific measurement of oxygen isotope ratios in cellulose: Isotopic exchange during heterotrophic cellulose synthesis

Effects of arsenic incorporation on jarosite dissolution rates and reaction products

Element abundances, patterns, and mobility in Nakhlite Miller Range 03346 and implications for aqueous alteration

Vapor saturation of sodium: Key to unlocking the origin of chondrules

Systematic variations of argon diffusion in feldspars and implications for thermochronometry

Solubility and partitioning behavior of Au, Cu, Ag and reduced S in magmas

Co-variation of nitrogen isotopes and redox states through glacial–interglacial cycles in the Black Sea

The Lappajärvi impact structure (Finland): Age, duration of crater cooling, and implications for early life

Metallic phases and siderophile elements in main group ureilites: Implications for ureilite petrogenesis

Isotope fractionation during Ca exchange on clay minerals in a marine environment

Corrigendum to "Hf–W chronometry of core formation in planetesimals inferred from weakly irradiated iron meteorites", Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 99 (2012) 287–304

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LATEST NEWS


Scientists map formation of Earth's oceanic crust
Planet Earth Online
The most complete geological map of an axial volcanic ridge in the Atlantic has been produced, helping scientists understand how the Earth's oceanic crust forms. This oceanic crust lies beneath the oceans and is thinner, but denser, than continental crust.
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Southwest's monsoon season may heat up with the climate
ScienceNews
The summer monsoon that dumps rain on an otherwise-arid American Southwest may grow stronger as the climate warms, suggests a study of the region's monsoon patterns of the last millennium. Across the Northern Hemisphere, monsoons — winds that change directions seasonally, altering rainfall — could intensify, the team reports May 27 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword CLIMATE CHANGE.


Extreme extraction
Chemistry World
Mining is already a reasonably extreme activity, moving and processing large quantities of material in often unpleasant and hazardous conditions. But imagine how much more extreme it would be to mine at the bottom of the ocean or on asteroids in the depths of space. That is exactly what a few pioneering companies are planning to do.
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Volcanoes cause climate gas concentrations to vary
environmentalresearchweb
First comprehensive analysis of sulfur dioxide concentration in the stratosphere/10 years. Measurements on board of ENVISAT/no identifiable anthropogenic sources of sulfur dioxide. Trace gases and aerosols are major factors influencing the climate. With the help of highly complex installations, such as MIPAS on board of the ENVISAT satellite, researchers try to better understand the processes in the upper atmosphere. They present the most comprehensive overview of sulfur dioxide measurements online in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions forum for review.
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NRL geochemistry survey at Chatham Rise reveals absence of modern day greenhouse gas emissions
U.S. Navy Research Lab
Geochemistry analysis conducted by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory of fossil sediment injection structures off the New Zealand coast in February and March reveal no presence of modern day expulsions of methane gas, a potential contributor to global "greenhouse effect" warming. The main focus of this most recent expedition was to investigate the geological origin of seafloor anomalies discovered during a 2007 marine-life survey on the Chatham Rise.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Earth's iron core is surprisingly weak (ScienceDaily)
New evidence supports theory of cosmic impact 12,800 years ago (DNA)
Geochemist aids development of geologic time scale for study of Earth's history (ScienceDaily)
Carbon holds the key to mantle redox heterogeneity (Deep Carbon Observatory)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

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