This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Click here to advertise in this news brief.




  Mobile version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit Jul. 2, 2013

Home   Join   Goldschmidt 2013   Career Center   GN Archive













 

Higher levels of stray gases found in water wells near shale gas sites
ScienceDaily
Some homeowners living near shale gas wells appear to be at higher risk of drinking water contamination from stray gases, according to a new Duke University-led study. The scientists analyzed 141 drinking water samples from private water wells across northeastern Pennsylvania's gas-rich Marcellus Shale basin.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Visit the Geosciences Knowledge Library

For decades Thermo Fisher Scientific has worked with Geoscientists helping to achieve a greater understanding of the earth and our planets. The data provided from the innovative technologies has been documented in a wide variety of literature. This knowledge is now accessible on www.thermoscientific.com/geoscience. Learn more about instruments and applications for the analysis of elements and isotopes.
 


SOCIETY NEWS


Is your contact information up to date?
GS
Summer is often a time of transition for many members of the geochemical community. If you have recently relocated and need to update your information, please login to your account and select "update" from the sidebar.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


Geochemical Career Center
GS

Tenure Track Position in Stable Isotope Geochemistry (Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA)




PhD in Experimental Geochemistry (GNS Science, Taupo, New Zealand)



Job Seekers: View current openings | Post your resume | Career resources

Employers: All jobs posted in the Geochemical Career Center are cross-promoted through our Facebook page and right here in Geochemical News.

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


New in GCA (v.115, 15 August 2013)
GS
Intraspecific variations in carbon-isotope and oxygen-isotope compositions of a brachiopod Basiliola lucida collected off Okinawa-jima, southwestern Japan

Development of alteration rinds by oxidative weathering processes in Beacon Valley, Antarctica, and implications for Mars

Impact history of the HED parent body(ies) clarified by new 40Ar/39Ar analyses of four HED meteorites and one anomalous basaltic achondrite

Determination of diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide in water between 268 and 473 K in a high-pressure capillary optical cell with in situ Raman spectroscopic measurements

Effect of the vapor phase on the salinity of halite-bearing aqueous fluid inclusions estimated from the halite dissolution temperature

A geochemical model of non-ideal solutions in the methane–ethane–propane–nitrogen–acetylene system on Titan

Large magnesium isotope fractionation in peridotite xenoliths from eastern North China craton: Product of melt–rock interaction


Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


New in GGG (v.14, May 2013)
GS
In situ redeposition of trace metals mobilized by CO2-charged brines (pages 1321–1332)

Constraints on core-mantle boundary topography from normal mode splitting (pages 1333–1342)

Use of cosmogenic 129I to constrain numerical models of fluid flow in marine sediments: Application to the Blake Ridge Hydrate Province (pages 1343–1357)

Decadal volcanic deformation in the Central Andes Volcanic Zone revealed by InSAR time series (pages 1358–1374)

Termination of a 6 year ridge-spreading event observed using a seafloor seismic network on the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge (pages 1375–1398)

Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


LATEST NEWS


Innovative Carbon Use Challenge
NineSights
The CCEMC Grand Challenge: Innovative Carbon Uses is a global quest to turn carbon emissions into a valuable resource. The Climate Change and Emissions Management Corporation (CCEMC) is seeking innovative ideas from around the world that will create new, carbon-based products and markets. The deadline to submit a brief, non-confidential proposal has been extended to July 31, 2013. Based on these submissions, a select group of participants will be invited to submit a complete and comprehensive proposal in Fall 2013. Up to 20 of those proposals will be selected for CAD $500,000 funding in seed grants. Complete information about the process, schedule, and awards is available at the website.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


Jets of molten rock push Earth's tectonic plates
NBCNews.com
Giant fountains of hot rock under central Africa and the central Pacific that have apparently remained stationary for at least 250 million years are helping drive the movements of the massive tectonic plates making up Earth's surface, researchers say.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Targeting 4 pollutants could reduce sea level rise
Science World Report
The U.S. National Research Council projects that sea levels will rise by up to a meter (20-39 inches) by 2100, specifically due to human-caused increases in greenhouse gases. However, a new study published in Nature Climate Change indicates that cutting four kinds of emissions – methane, tropospheric ozone, hydrofluorocarbons, and black carbon – could reduce the warming trend by 25 to 50 percent by 2050.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Study: Mars had oxygen-rich atmosphere 4 billion years ago
Sci-News.com
According to a new study reported in the journal Nature, the atmosphere of Mars could have been rich in oxygen almost 4 billion years ago. Scientists from Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Oxford analyzed the compositions of Martian meteorites found on Earth and data from NASA's rovers.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Ghosts of forests past: Bark beetles kill lodgepole pines, affecting entire watersheds
The National Science Foundation
In mountains across the Western United States, scientists are racing against time —against a tiny beetle — to save the last lodgepole pines. Forests are bleeding out from the effects of the beetles, their conifers' needles turning crimson before the trees die.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Why geologist tasted 2.6 billion-year-old water (CNN)
Early Mars atmosphere 'oxygen-rich' before Earth's (BBC News)
Elements: 50 issues later (GS)
Secrets of biological soil crusts uncovered (ScienceDaily)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

Geochemical News
Geochemical Society Content Editors: Martin Elsner, Shuhei Ono,
Lesley Warren, and Helen Williams   
Contribute news


For MultiBriefs:
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Tammy Gibson, Content Editor, 469.420.2677   
Contribute news

This edition of Geochemical News was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent Issues
July 2, 2013
June 25, 2013
June 18, 2013
June 11, 2013



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063