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Burrowing animals may have been key to stabilizing Earth's oxygen
University of Southern Denmark
Around 540 million years ago, the first burrowing animals evolved. When these worms began to mix up the ocean floor's sediments, their activity came to significantly influence the ocean's phosphorus cycle and as a result, the amount of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere.
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SOCIETY NEWS


Hazen named 2014 F. Earl Ingerson Lecturer
GS
Robert M. Hazen (Carnegie Institution of Washington) has been selected as the 2014 F. Earl Ingerson Lecturer. His talk, Chance and necessity in the mineral evolution of terrestrial planets, will be presented at the GSA Annual Meeting in Vancouver, Canada this October. (Photo credit: Deep Carbon Observatory)
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Geochemical Career Center
GS


New! Professor (W3) for Petrology (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany)




Associate Environmental Geoscientist (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL, USA)




Senior Staff Associate (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University of Columbia University, Palisades, NY, USA)




Lectureship in Earth Sciences (University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, UK)




Faculty Position in Geology (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA)




Assistant Professor of Geochemistry (University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK, USA)


Job Seekers: View current openings | Post your resume | Career resources

Employers: All jobs posted in the Geochemical Career Center are cross-promoted through Facebook, Twitter and right here in Geochemical News.

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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Analab Corrosion Resistant Laboratory Appliances

Analab manufacture corrosion resistant laboratory appliances such as acid vapour cleaning stations, hotplates, and sample preparation devices. Our devices can be used with a wide range of acids and bases (HF to NH4OH). We are represented in North America by Isomass Scientific.

Please visit us at GSA 2014 in Vancouver, Booth 1018.
 


New in GCA (v.140, 1 September 2014)
GS
[open access] Process dominance shift in solute chemistry as revealed by long-term high-frequency water chemistry observations of groundwater flowing through weathered argillite underlying a steep forested hillslope

Rare earth elements as indicators of hydrothermal processes within the East Scotia subduction zone system

Oxygen metabolism and water mass mixing in the northern Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone in 2010

Anaerobic ammonium-oxidising bacteria: A biological source of the bacteriohopanetetrol stereoisomer in marine sediments

Nickel partitioning in biogenic and abiogenic ferrihydrite: The influence of silica and implications for ancient environments

Oxygenation of Ediacaran Ocean recorded by iron isotopes

Stable carbon isotope fractionation of six strongly fractionating microorganisms is not affected by growth temperature under laboratory conditions

Sources of core and intact branched tetraether membrane lipids in the lacustrine environment: Anatomy of Lake Challa and its catchment, equatorial East Africa

Towards quantifying the reaction network around the sulfate–methane-transition-zone in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea, with a kinetic modeling approach

Assessment of the clumped isotope composition of fossil bone carbonate as a recorder of subsurface temperatures

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Conference Calendar September deadlines
GS
Registration Deadlines
Sept. 12: MS&T'14 Materials Science & Technology Conference and Exhibition (USA)
Sept. 13: Big Data and the Smarter Use of Data in the Global Mining Industry (USA)
Sept. 15: Geological Society of America Annual Meeting (Canada)

Conference organizers — be sure to add your conference to our conference calendar.

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GEOCHEMISTRY IN THE NEWS


Still hot inside the Moon: Tidal heating in the deepest part of the lunar mantle
National Astronomical Observatory of Japan via ScienceDaily
Scientists have found that there is an extremely soft layer deep inside the Moon and that heat is effectively generated in the layer by the gravity of the Earth. These findings suggest that the interior of the Moon has not yet cooled and hardened, and also that it is still being warmed by the effect of the Earth on the Moon. This research provides a chance to reconsider how both the Earth and the Moon have been evolving since their births through mutual influence until now.
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Humans have tripled mercury levels in the ocean
Nature
Mercury levels in the upper ocean have tripled since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, and human activities are to blame, researchers report in Nature. Although several computer models have estimated the amount of marine mercury, the new analysis provides the first global measurements. It fills in a critical piece of the global environmental picture, tracking not just the amount of mercury in the world's oceans, but where it came from and at what depths it is found.
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Water 'microhabitats' in oil show potential for extraterrestrial life, oil cleanup: Extremophilic ecosystems writ small
Washington State University via ScienceDaily
An international team of researchers has found extremely small habitats that increase the potential for life on other planets while offering a way to clean up oil spills on our own. Looking at samples from the world's largest natural asphalt lake, they found active microbes in droplets as small as a microliter, which is about 1/50th of a drop of water.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Mineral magic? Common mineral capable of making, breaking bonds (Arizona State University)
Asteroids wreaked havoc on early Earth (Nature)
Mysterious Siberian crater attributed to methane (Nature)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

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