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An update on blind spots of pesticide degradation in the environment
German Research Center for Environmental Health
In the latest issue of Science, an international team of researchers critically evaluates the current state of knowledge on pesticide degradation in the environment. Despite numerous standardized tests - the study concludes - a systematic understanding is still lacking to identify and predict degradation in environmental compartments that are difficult to access, such as groundwater.
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SOCIETY NEWS


Award Nomination Diversity
GS
Do you feel that many scientific awards lack diversity? We couldn’t agree more. Please read Sam Mukasa's Triple Point from 2009 for recent statistics. Unfortunately no significant improvement has been achieved since. Why? A major reason is too few take the time to nominate worthy candidates for Society recognition. Do something about it and help us break this trend by making a nomination. Nominations are easy and the nomination deadline is October 15
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New Member Incentive
GS
Do you know students who could benefit from online access to nine years of archived Elements magazine issues for $10 (US)? Perhaps a colleague is going to Goldschmidt2014 and could benefit from the member registration discount. Please help grow our community by recruiting others to join. Have them visit us at geochemsoc.org and check us out. As an incentive for new members, if they join by September 20, they will receive two extra print issues of Elements (Oct 2013, Dec 2013) with their 2014 membership.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Access integrated sediment geochemistry data

SedDB gives interactive access to a global synthesis of major and trace element concentrations, radiogenic and stable isotope ratios, and other data for bulk sediments, and organic and inorganic components, leachates, and size fractions of sediments. SedDB holds over 750,000 chemical values for >13,000 cores and other sediment samples!
 


Geochemical Career Center
GS


New! Assistant Professor of Organic Geochemistry (The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK, USA)




New! Ph.D. Studentship in Mineral Surface (Geo)Chemistry (Umeaa University, Umeaa, Sweden)




Program Director of the Geobiology and Low-Temperature Geochemistry Program (National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA, USA)




Application Specialist - Gas Isotope MS (m/f) (Thermo Scientific, Germany)




Postdoctoral and/or PhD position(s) for Re-Os geochemistry of shale's and hydrocarbons (Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA)



Tenure-Track Position in Organic Geochemistry (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA)



Postdoctoral Researcher, Mantle Processes Group (Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA)



Geochemistry and Habitability of Ancient Waters: Postdoctoral Position Available (University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada)


Harry S. Truman Fellowship in National Security Science and Engineering (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA)



Final Days! Associate Isotope Geochemist or Isotop Geochemist (depending on qualifications) (Illinois State Geological Survey, Urbana-Champaign, IL, USA)



Final Days! Research Lab Specialist (electron microscopy, Auger nanoscope, XRD) (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA)


Job Seekers: View current openings | Post your resume | Career resources

Employers: All jobs posted in the Geochemical Career Center are cross-promoted through Facebook, Twitter and right here in Geochemical News.

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New in GCA (v.118, 1 October 2013)
GS
Coupled sulfur and oxygen isotope insight into bacterial sulfate reduction in the natural environment

Structure and density of molten fayalite at high pressure

XANES spectroscopy as a tool to trace phosphorus transformation during soil genesis and mountain ecosystem development from lake sediments

The rate of oxygen isotope exchange between nitrate and water

The role of Fe and redox conditions in olivine carbonation rates: An experimental study of the rate limiting reactions at 90 and 150 °C in open and closed systems

Characterization of laboratory analogs of interstellar/cometary organic residues using very high resolution mass spectrometry

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New in G-Cubed
GS
The effect of chemical pre-treatment of sediment upon foraminifera-based proxies

P-T-D histories from quartz: A case study of the application of the TitaniQ thermobarometer to progressive fabric development in metapelites

Petrological variability of recent magmatism at axial seamount summit, juan de fuca ridge

Heterogeneous magnesium isotopic composition of the lower continental crust: A xenolith perspective

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LATEST NEWS


Crystallographic defects and deep carbon storage
Deep Carbon Observatory
The largest reservoir of carbon on Earth is within its interior. A long-standing question is: Where and how is this carbon stored in the mantle? The search for carbon hosts has focused on homogeneous mineral phases as well as some carbon-rich fluids or melts. However, in a recent paper released in Nature Geoscience, Jun Wu and Peter Buseck from Arizona State University provide a new perspective for answering this question.
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Underwater volcano is Earth's biggest
Nature
Geophysicists have discovered what they say is the largest single volcano on Earth, a 650-kilometre-wide beast the size of the British Isles lurking beneath the waters of the northwest Pacific Ocean.
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Big dig to unearth the mysteries locked deep inside our planet
Calgary Herald
The deepest hole ever made is more than 40 years old, and quite dead. After reaching a depth of seven-and-a-half miles, the temperature rose so high that to go any further would have melted the bit. Now, a new program of ocean-drilling is under way, attempting to reach parts of the planet's interior never before penetrated.
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Mars could have developed life more quickly than Earth
io9
Nobody is sure how life emerged from the primordial chemistry of Earth. But now we have more evidence that Earth-like life could have evolved on Mars. In a paper published in Nature, a group of geologists and chemists from the University of Las Vegas, Nevada, explain that phosphates — minerals that are crucial for building DNA, cell membranes and many other parts of our bodies — would have been much more available for proto-life on Mars than they were on Earth.
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Mega-canyon discovered under Greenland ice
Popular Mechanics
Buried beneath a mile of ice in the center of Greenland is a beautifully preserved canyon more than 460 miles long and reaching depths of 2,600 feet—similar in scale to parts of the Grand Canyon. Geoscientists who scouted the hidden landscape using ice-penetrating radar, which maps the topography of the land under the ice, announced the discovery in a recent issue of the journal Science.
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Naturally occurring methane found in some Pennsylvania water
U.S. Geological Survey
Two of 20 randomly selected and tested household wells used for drinking water in Sullivan County, Pa., produced groundwater with elevated concentrations of naturally occurring dissolved methane, the most common component of natural gas, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey study conducted in collaboration with the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Bureau of Topographic and Geological Survey.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Earth life 'may have come from Mars' (BBC News)
Deep microbes live long and slow (BBC News)
Chelyabinsk meteorite may have collided with another body in solar system (Sci-News.com)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

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