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Mars rover uncovers evidence of water flows
USA Today    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
NASA's Curiosity rover has now confirmed what scientists have long suspected — that water anywhere from ankle to waist deep once flowed on Mars' surface. The conclusion, scientists said at a briefing, is based on images showing what looks like an ancient gravel stream bed. More





 Society News


2013 Membership Drive
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Membership renewal emails were sent out earlier this week. If you have not done so, please take a moment to renew online. Through Nov. 30, 2012, membership is still only $30 (USD) for professional members ($10 students). Starting Dec. 1, 2012, member dues will increase by $5 ($35 for professionals, $15 for students).

Scientific societies like ours are a crucial link in the science enterprise because of their unique ability to organize unbiased peer review of journal articles and to provide vital forums for sharing scientific information. We are only able to do this with your membership and involvement. Please contact us at any time with your member needs or questions and thank you for being a part of the Geochemical Society.


Featured Geochemical Career Center postings
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New! Senior-Level Faculty Position in Paleoclimatology (Baylor University, Waco, TX, USA)

Assistant Professor, Atmospheric/ Hydrological Sciences (University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA)

Carnegie Postdoctoral Fellowship Positions in Geochemistry, Cosmochemistry, and Astrobiology (Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC, USA)

Environmental Earth Sciences Faculty Position (University of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN, USA)

USGS Mendenhall Research Fellowship in Noble Gas Isotopes or Stable Isotopes (US Geological Survey, Denver, CO, USA)

Associate Isotope Geochemist or Isotope Geochemist (Illinois State Geological Survey, Urbana-Champaign, IL, USA)

Faculty Positions in Continental Margins and Coastal Environments (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, CA, USA)

Job Seekers: It only takes a few minutes to create an account to apply for jobs. Sign up now for access to all the great features on Geochemical Career Center.

Employers: For a nominal fee (a single 60-day post is 250 USD), the link to your post will be distributed in future issues of Geochemical News – reaching over 5,000 subscribers and also on our Facebook page with over 1,000 likes.




 Latest News


Buddhist statue acquired by Nazis is space rock
NewScientist    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
One religious statue has a stronger connection than most to the heavens. An 11th-century carving from Mongolia of the Buddhist god Vaisravana was fashioned from a meteorite fragment, a chemical analysis shows. Its extraterrestrial origins make it unique in both religious art and meteorite science. More

Molecular fossils: new compounds from 4900-year-old wood
Chemistry World    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
If you dug up a wooden artifact, how could you tell what type of tree it came from? French chemists have identified unique molecules from an ancient piece of oak that could hold the key. Pierre Adam and co-workers from the University of Strasbourg, France, used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to identify triterpenoid molecules, which appear to be related to the natural product oleanane, in a 4900-year-old wood sample collected from river sediments. More

Extreme climate change linked to early animal evolution
e! Science News    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
An international team of scientists, including geochemists from the University of California, Riverside, has uncovered new evidence linking extreme climate change, oxygen rise, and early animal evolution. A dramatic rise in atmospheric oxygen levels has long been speculated as the trigger for early animal evolution. More

Old clam shells act like ocean sensors
Futurity    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
Off the coast of Maine, clams can live up to 240 years, year after year adding another band to their shells, just like a tree adds another growth ring. In the colder waters of the North Atlantic near Iceland, the clams can live up to 500 years, recording even more information in what scientists call annual shell increments. More

NASA's Dawn mission discovers hydrogen on giant asteroid Vesta
Tuscon Citizen    Share    Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
The first measurements of the elemental composition of the surface of the giant asteroid Vesta indicate that hydrogen was brought to the body by impactors, research by a team led by Planetary Science Institute Senior Scientist Thomas H. Prettyman has shown. More


 

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