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Vast new freshwater sources found beneath the sea
Environment News Service
Huge reservoirs of low-salinity water have been discovered where they are least expected – buried under the seabed on continental shelves around the world. A study published today in the scientific journal Nature, reveals that an estimated half a million cubic kilometers of low-salinity water has been located off Australia, China, North America and South Africa.
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SOCIETY NEWS


Timothy Grove named 2014 V.M. Goldschmidt Medalist
GS
Timothy Grove, Professor in the Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences at Massachusetts Institute of Technology has been selected as the recipient of the 2014 V.M. Goldschmidt Award. The Goldschmidt Award recognizes major achievements in geochemistry or cosmochemistry consisting of either a single outstanding contribution or a series of publications that have had great influence on the field. Grove is recognized for his outstanding contributions to understanding magma genesis on Earth, other planets, and planetary bodies; his ability to combine exquisite and difficult petrologic experimentation with field work; and, his creativity in driving thought on generation mechanisms of magmas in new directions. He is highly regarded in particular for his work on the role of water in magma genesis. The award will be presented at the Goldschmidt2014 conference this June.
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Christopher Reddy named 2014 C.C. Patterson Medalist
GS
Christopher Reddy, Senior Scientist in the Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry Department of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has been selected as the recipient of the 2014 C.C. Patterson Award. The Patterson Award recognizes an innovative breakthrough of fundamental significance in environmental geochemistry, particularly in service of society, consisting of either a single outstanding contribution or a short series of papers published within the last decade. Reddy is recognized for his analytical and scientific contributions to organic geochemistry. The award will be presented at the Goldschmidt2014 conference this June.
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Matthew Jackson named 2014 F.W. Clarke Medalist
GS
Matthew Jackson, Associate Professor in the Department of Earth Science at the University of California – Santa Barbara, has been selected as the recipient of the 2014 F.W. Clarke Award. Dr. Jackson is being recognized for his outstanding series of high impact papers on mantle geochemistry that have made a fundamental and transformative contribution to our knowledge of mantle recycling and the mantle reservoirs. The Clarke Award recognizes an early-career scientist for a single outstanding contribution to geochemistry or cosmochemistry published either as a single paper or a series of papers on a single topic. The award will be presented at the Goldschmidt2014 conference this June.
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Geochemical Career Center
GS


New! Scripps Institution of Oceanography Postdoctoral Position (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA, USA)



International research chair in stable isotope biogeochemistry / paleoceanography (LabexMER, Brest/Dinard, France)



Post-doc in Geochemistry at GEUS (Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen, Denmark)



Post-docs and Graduate Students Opportunities at ASU, MIT, UC Riverside, U Maryland and U Washington (Multi-Institutional, USA)



Assistant Professor of Mineralogy and/or Petrology (Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA)



Executive Editor for Elements Magazine (Mineralogical Society of America, Chantilly, VA, USA)



Open Faculty Position in Experimental Earth Science (Columbia University, Palisades, NY, USA)



Assistant/Associate Professor in Geochemistry (Laurentian University, Sudbury, ON, Canada)



Assistant or Associate Professor - Lithogeochemistry (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO, USA)



Manager of Stable Isotope Laboratory (University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA)




Roger E. Deane Postdoctoral Fellowship (University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada)



Final Days! Tenure Track Assistant Professor-Geochemistry (Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, USA)



Final Days! Faculty Member in Geobiology or Paleobiology (UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA)




Final Days! Research Associate in Raman Spectroscopy (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA)



Final Days! Assistant Professor of Coastal Systems and Geochemistry (University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston, MA, USA)

Job Seekers: View current openings | Post your resume | Career resources

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New in GCA (v.122, 01 December 2013)
GS
Estimation and application of the thermodynamic properties of aqueous phenanthrene and isomers of methylphenanthrene at high temperature

Short duration thermal metamorphism in CR chondrites

Chromium valences in ureilite olivine and implications for ureilite petrogenesis

In situ observation of D-rich carbonaceous globules embedded in NWA 801 CR2 chondrite

Hydrothermal mobilization of pegmatite-hosted REE and Zr at Strange Lake, Canada: A reaction path model

High precision determination of the terrestrial 40K abundance

[open access] Geochemical provincialism in the Iceland plume

Solid–aqueous equilibrium in the BaSO4–RaSO4–H2O system: First-principles calculations and a thermodynamic assessment

10Be dating of Neogene halite

A self-consistent model describing the thermodynamics of Eu(III) adsorption onto hematite

Analysis of single oil-bearing fluid inclusions in mid-Proterozoic sandstones (Roper Group, Australia)

Estimation of stability constants for metal–ligand complexes containing neutral nitrogen donor atoms with applications to natural organic matter

Natural age dispersion arising from the analysis of broken crystals. Part I: Theoretical basis and implications for the apatite (U–Th)/He thermochronometer

Structural investigation of glasses along the MgSiO3–CaSiO3 join: Diffraction studies

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New in G-Cubed
GS
The Giant Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) as a modern analog for fossil ostreoids: Isotopic (Ca, O, C) and elemental (Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca, Mn/Ca) proxies

Chemostratigraphic implications of spatial variation in the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum carbon isotope excursion, SE Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

First observations of the fumarolic gas output from a restless caldera: Implications for the current period of unrest (2005–2013) at Campi Flegrei

Moytirra: Discovery of the first known deep-sea hydrothermal vent field on the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge north of the Azores

Prolonged plume volcanism in the Caribbean Large Igneous Province: New insights from Curaçao and Haiti

[open access] Petrological variability of recent magmatism at Axial Seamount summit, Juan de Fuca Ridge

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LATEST NEWS


100th Anniversary of the Discovery of Isotopes
Nature
In 1913, only the barest outlines of the structure of the atom had been drawn. Frederick Soddy, although struggling to understand how an electron could be emitted from the nucleus during beta-decay, supported the conclusions of A. van de Broeck — that an element's atomic number, not its atomic weight, is the fundamental parameter determining chemical properties. Soddy introduced the word 'isotope' for elements that occupy the same place in the periodic table and hence have identical properties, though different mass. He also contested "Rutherford's tentative theory" that the nucleus has only positive charge.
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Experiment is first to simulate warming of Arctic permafrost
ScienceDaily
Although vegetation growth in the Arctic is boosted by global warming, it's not enough to offset the carbon released by the thawing of the permafrost beneath the surface, University of Florida researchers have found in the first experiment in the Arctic environment to simulate thawing of permafrost in a warming world.
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Geology: North America's broken heart
Nature
A billion years ago, a huge rift nearly cleaved North America down the middle. And then it failed. Researchers may be getting close to finding out why.
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Mass extinction the result of acid rain and ozone loss
Chemistry World
Widespread rain as acidic as lemon juice and the destruction of as much as 65 percent of the ozone layer may have played a major role in the largest mass extinction in the fossil record. This conclusion was reached by a U.S. team that used geological samples to develop a climate model that predicted extreme atmospheric effects that could have been behind the mass extinction at the end of the Permian.
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Magma ocean could have given early Earth magnetic field
LiveScience
Earth may have possessed a magnetic field shortly after its birth, suggesting that magnetic shielding could have played a larger role in the development of life on Earth than currently thought, researchers say in a new study.
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How water dissolves stone, molecule by molecule
ScienceDaily
Scientists from Rice University and the University of Bremen's Center for Marine Environmental Sciences (MARUM) in Germany have combined cutting-edge experimental techniques and computer simulations to find a new way of predicting how water dissolves crystalline structures like those found in natural stone and cement.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
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    The ancient Martian rock that fell to Earth (Popular Mechanics)
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