This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




  Text Version  RSS  Subscribe  Unsubscribe  Archive  Media Kit

Home  About  Membership  Education  Certification  Resources       April 24, 2014



IAFN Online Learning Center

The IAFN Online Learning Center provides online self-paced educational opportunities for forensic nurses and allies. Our catalog features pre-recorded content on a variety of topics and will continue to grow with exciting new educational opportunities.



Discounted Membership Bundles Available
Do you have a group of 5 or more RN's (3 in a rural setting)? Contact the Membership Director, Marisa Raso, to find how much you could save off a Bundled Membership for your team.

 


FORENSIC NURSES NEWS


Still time for the 2014 ANF Nursing Research Grants
IAFN is collaborating with the American Nurses Foundation (ANF) to offer a $5,000 research grant to a forensic nurse researcher. The grant application is open to all of IAFN's global members. This award is part of the 2014 Nursing Research Grants which offers nursing research awards totaling more than $225,000 to beginner and experienced nurse researchers. Information about all of the awards is available at: GIVETONURSING.ORG. The application deadline is May 1.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article




SANE Training
40-Hour Online Training Program with access to optional onsite clinical skills simulation training, begins May 2014. Learn more, here.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


Housing is OPEN for Annual Conference
Reserve a room now for the 2014 International Conference on Forensic Nursing Science and Practice. Registration scheduled to open June 2014.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




INDUSTRY NEWS


Child forensic interviews boost courtroom success
WLUK-TV
Taking the stand in a courtroom to talk about alleged child abuse isn’t always easy for kids. “It can be very difficult. They’re scared. You can tell that they oftentimes don’t want to look at their accuser, or excuse me, their perpetrator,” says Brown County District Attorney, David Lasee. Case in point: In 2010, Outagamie County prosecutors accused Jamie Sames of touching a girl outside a Target store. Giving what some may consider graphic testimony sparked emotions for this 13-year-old sexual abuse victim.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Give importance to forensic evidence, says SC
Deccan Herald
The Supreme Court has asked the law enforcement agencies to give due importance to forensic science for crime detection in view of emergence of new types of crimes. A bench of Justices K.S. Radhakrishnan and A.K. Sikri said, “Many a times, reliable witnesses seldom come forward for deposing before the court, allowing the hardened criminals to get away, so the investigating agencies have to look for other ways which are sound in science as well as in law.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Young women see sexual assault as normal, report finds
The Huffington Post
How does a crime committed against nearly 238,000 women a year go unreported 60 percent of the time? According to a new report, many victims of sexual assault may not actually see themselves as victims. Heather Hlavka, a sociologist at Marquette University, analyzed interviews with 100 girls between ages three and 17 who may have experienced sexual assault. Overwhelmingly, their accounts indicated that sexual violence had been normalized in their communities. They considered harassment an everyday part of life rather than a criminal act.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Accusation in Montana of treating rape lightly stirs unlikely public fight
The New York Times
For nearly three years, this college town in the hills of western Montana has lived under the shadow of stories of rapes gone unpunished and complaints that officials minimized or ignored reports of sexual assaults — especially if the suspects played for the University of Montana Grizzlies, the wildly popular football team. The latest blow landed over the winter when federal investigators released a 20-page report saying the county prosecutor’s office had disregarded sexual assaults to the point that it was placing “women in Missoula at increased risk of harm.”
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Sexual assaults on campus under national scrutiny
Springfield News-Leader
Two separate, alleged sexual assaults on the Missouri State University campus — on March 30 and April 4 — come at a time when the rape and sexual assault of women on college campuses has come under national scrutiny, in part from U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill. "There are young women that are victimized every day, every hour, at a college campus somewhere," McCaskill told the News-Leader. "Too often young women second-guess themselves. 'I should not have been drinking. I should not have been in his room. I did not know him well enough.'
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Military victims of sexual assault face agonizing choice: Speak up or stay silent
The Reporter
The war veteran wakes up at 11 a.m. and spends the afternoon alone studying, and so it is not until early evening, during her shift at the restaurant where she works as a waitress, that the first lie of the day is required. “Everything okay?” a colleague asks. “It’s fine,” she says, and the lying is underway. Lie after lie: This has been her life since coming home last year from Afghanistan — the daily maintenance of a thousand little fictions to keep everyone from finding out what happened over there.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Sandusky penalty paying for agencies that protect children
The News-Gazette
Midway through her talk with forensic interviewer Mary Bunyard, the 17-year-old provided a crucial detail about the man who abused her. An investigator watching from another room had the proof needed to corroborate her story. He grabbed a phone, and within minutes the suspect was arrested. "I came out of the interview and they said, 'We got this guy already,' " Bunyard said.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


The Forensic Exams with Transgender Sexual Assault Survivors
The Forensic Exams with Transgender Sexual Assault Survivors webinar is now archived on the FORGE website for anytime viewing! The webinar is free and has several really helpful handouts associated with it. Check it out at this link!
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article


How far would you go to tell a story?
Voices and Faces
Nine years ago, writer and Voices and Faces Project founder Anne K. Ream and documentary photographer Patricia Evans embarked on a unique journey. Their goal was to bear witness to the stories of sexual violence survivors who have been shaped – but refuse to be defined – by what has been done to them. Their passion was to put names and faces on an issue that too often leaves its victims silent, and invisible. The resulting book of narrative and photographic profiles, Lived Through This: Listening to the Stories of Sexual Violence Survivors, is now available.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Overcoming communication challenges of EHRs
By Jessica Taylor
The transition to electronic health records can bring some concerns for healthcare providers, including workflow, training, privacy and security. But one of the most important issues is communication, and many clinicians are concerned that using a computer with a patient will hinder communication. To overcome these challenges and make sure your patient has your undivided attention, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has provided five communication behaviors for the integration of EHRs into your practice.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Be aware but not informed about military sexual assault (USA Today)
Medicine meets law: Forensic psychiatrists evaluate the disturbed and dangerous (Rutgers)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 

Forensic Nurses News
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Jessica Taylor, Senior Medical Editor, 202.684.7169   
Contribute news

Disclaimer: Forensic Nurses News is a weekly roundup of articles of interest to those who practice forensic nursing. This email may contain an advertisement of the International Association of Forensic Nurses and/or third party products and services. Opinions expressed in these articles do not necessarily reflect the views of Forensic Nurses or its advertising partners. Forensic Nursing News is compiled by MultiBriefs, a division of MultiView, Inc. Factual errors are the responsibility of the listed publication.

This edition of the Forensic Nurses News was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
April 17, 2014
April 10, 2014
April 3, 2014
March 27, 2014



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063