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Home  About  Membership  Education  Certification  Resources       October 30, 2014



IAFN Online Learning Center

The IAFN Online Learning Center provides online self-paced educational opportunities for forensic nurses and allies. Our catalog features pre-recorded content on a variety of topics and will continue to grow with exciting new educational opportunities.



Discounted Membership Bundles Available
Do you have a group of 5 or more RN's (3 in a rural setting)? Contact the Membership Director, Marisa Raso, to find how much you could save off a Bundled Membership for your team.

 


FORENSIC NURSES NEWS


2013 Annual Report - Leadership.Care.Expertise
During 2013, the Association's membership numbers remained steady at 3000+ members strong, and increasingly, members are renewing their annual membership. Our members are active and engaged; more than 294 members served as board or committee members while 100s more volunteered their time, energy, and expertise, by participating in their local chapter or sharing their knowledge through our Online Member Community and learning management system.
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New SANE Program Sustainability App
Developed by the International Association of Forensic Nurses and the National Sexual Violence Resource Center, this Apple app offers free, easy-to-navigate resources on staffing, collaboration, funding, billing, program expansion, evaluation and assessment.
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Get your Free Forensic Nurses Week poster
Have you heard? Did you know? ... Forensic Nurses Week is only a couple weeks away! The IAFN is celebrating YOU and the forensic nursing profession Nov. 10 -14, 2014.

How will you celebrate? You can start by ordering your 2014 Forensic Nurses Week poster from the Marketplace. While you are there check out all the new items available just in time for Forensic Nurses Week.

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2014 Election Nominees
The Nominating Committee has selected the slate for the future Board, Nominating Committee and Certification Commission. Online voting begins Nov. 1-30, but you can view the candidates now.
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INDUSTRY NEWS


Register now for the 2015 American Nurses Association Quality Conference
Feb. 4-6. 2015, Lake Buena Vista, Florida
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Save the Date for the National Canadian Forensic Nursing Conference
Feb. 25-26, 2015, Renaissance Vancouver Harbourside
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The 'Yes Means Yes' World
Inside Higher Ed
When the sexual assault prevention group Culture of Respect attended the Dartmouth Summit on Sexual Assault in July to promote its forthcoming website, the group went by a different name. The nonprofit passed out business cards and marketing all emblazoned with the phrase “No Means No.”
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Ethical Problems: DNR Order — Good policy, or bad habit?
Nursing 2014
Recently, several family members asked me if a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order for their unconscious, terminally ill father was appropriate at this time. They were afraid that agreeing to DNR status might mean they were giving up too soon. I listened to their concerns and documented the conversation, only to discover the physician had already written a DNR order and documented family approval.
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The nurse speaks: Making our voices heard
By Keith Carlson
When there's a major public health crisis, doctors are generally the experts sought out to provide commentary on television, radio and other venues of mainstream media. This is how it has always been, and it will continue to be this way without a major shift in nurses' self-awareness and media-savvy assertiveness. If nurses are the most trusted profession — as evidenced by the annual Gallup poll that asks Americans who they trust and who they feel is most honest — why aren't nurses regularly utilized as sources of commentary when the proverbial feces hits the fan?
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The Nursing Community Stands United for Swift and Coordinated Action to Protect the Public and Health Providers against the Ebola Virus Disease
Nursing Community
As a coalition of 61 national nursing organizations, the Nursing Community stands united that the focus on responding to the Ebola Virus Disease in the United States and the devastating outbreak in West Africa must be on patient health and community protection. The undersigned organizations are dedicated to supporting the profession, over 3 million licensed registered nurses, in their frontline work to provide direct care and education to patients and the public regarding the Ebola Virus Disease.
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Vice President Biden and Attorney General Holder announce grants to help reduce domestic violence homicides
The United States Department of Justice
Vice President Joe Biden and Attorney General Eric Holder today announced grants to 12 programs across the country to target the urgent need to reduce domestic violence homicides. On average, three women a day die as a result of domestic violence Research shows that women whose partner threatens them with a gun or other weapon are 20 times more likely to subsequently be murdered than other abused women.
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How age-progression software helps find missing kids
FOX News
If you happen to be driving in St. Joseph, Minnesota, this weekend, look up at the billboards to see a picture of Jacob Wetterling. An image created last year shows how Wetterling, who went missing 25 years ago at age 11, might look today at age 36. The new billboards are the latest attempt by law enforcement officials to engage the public in finding Wetterling, who was abducted by a masked gunman on a country road in 1989. His first age-progressed image was released in 1998, then in 2007, and again in 2013.
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Healthcare media hype: Have you jumped on the bandwagon?
By Jessica Taylor
Mass media is a substantial power in modern culture, especially in America. We live in a mediated culture — where news both reflects and creates the culture. Our society is continuously bombarded with messages from a multitude of sources promoting not only products, but moods, attitudes and a sense of what is and isn't important in the world. So, is the media really honing in on what you want? Or are you jumping on the media-hype bandwagon? Let's take the most recent news stories of Ebola, for example.
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Are our brains physically shaped by life experiences?
Medical News Today
Last month, Medical News Today investigated what the adult health consequences - both psychological and physical - of childhood bullying may be. Among the adverse effects linked with a history of being bullied, our feature briefly touched on some intriguing findings concerning physiological changes linked to bullying. These included a 2014 study into the long-term health effects of bullying that posited bullying as a kind of "toxic stress," measurable by abnormal levels of C-reactive protein, which last into adulthood.
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Louisiana can look to other states for ways to shield rape victims from examination costs
The Times-Picayune
Rape victims in Louisiana can face thousands of dollars in medical bills for sexual assault exams and related medical costs, depending upon what hospital they go to for help. It's a problem not only for victims, but for the state. That's because federal law requires that victims not have to pay any out-of-pocket costs for these exams. Yet for the past nine years Louisiana has received $17.3 million in federal grant money on the premise that the state is compliant with that rule. It is not.
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Nurses to administrators: We're not happy about EHRs
By Scott E. Rupp
Nurses are not happy about having to use electronic health records, a new report suggests. According to the Q3 2014 Black Book EHR Loyalty survey, 92 percent of nursing staff are dissatisfied with the systems — an all-time high. Nurses in 84 percent of U.S. hospitals also state they are struggling with flawed EHR systems, and as many as 88 percent blame financial administrators and CIOs for selecting low-performance systems because of low prices, the need to chase federal incentives and cutting corners at the expense of quality of care.
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Identify, Isolate, Inform: Emergency Department Evaluation and Management for Patients Who Present with Possible Ebola Virus Disease
CDC
The procedures in the accompanying algorithm provide guidance on the Emergency Department (ED) evaluation and management of patients who present with possible Ebola Virus Disease. The guidance in this document reflects lessons learned from the recent experiences of U.S. hospitals caring for Ebola patients. The risk of transmission of Ebola virus from a patient to a healthcare worker depends upon the likelihood that the patient will have confirmed Ebola Virus Disease combined with the likelihood and degree of exposure to infectious blood or body fluids.
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What if America had Canada's healthcare system?
The Atlantic
It's not uncommon, when Republicans score a major political victory, for American liberals to throw up their hands and say, "Screw this! I'm moving to Canada." More often than not, it's an empty threat — deterred either by the intricacies of the visa process or a glance at the January weather forecast in Winnipeg. But what if the opposite happened? What if Canada moved here? Specifically, what if its healthcare system were to pack up, migrate southward, and rain its single-payer munificence over America, for a change?
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When doctors and nurses work together
The New York Times
Not long ago, I heard a respected senior colleague recount to a group of medical students and trainees the story of a patient who had died under his care some 15 years earlier. Afterward, he had spent hours talking with the family, trying, he said, “to be as kind to them as I possibly could.” The family had been grateful for all his efforts, but my colleague still struggled even to tell the story. “Were you afraid of getting sued?” one of the students suddenly asked.
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10 ways to apply social tools for an improved patient experience
By Christina Thielst
The pressures and drivers to reduce costs, improve quality, emphasize prevention and increase access are making social media and the underlying technologies more attractive to healthcare leaders. They can be effective and efficient tools for the delivery of communications to targeted individuals and/or populations. As a result, those leaders who recognize that we must change the way care is provided are starting to explore new ways of engaging patients across the continuum of care.
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Turning fear into facts: The wicked story of forensic science
The Exponent
Skeletonizing, the art of stripping flesh from bone, for professor Trevor Stamper, is “actually really relaxing.” To reveal the skeleton, an animal is put into a double boiler system, utilizing warm water, potassium hydroxide and a strainer system which strips the animal’s flesh from its bones. Stamper worked for a time in a vertebrae museum and was able to see the animals in a way that he never saw them in life before.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Battered, Bereaved and Behind Bars (BuzzFeed)
7 high school players face sexual assault charges over alleged locker room hazing (CNN)
Study identifies risk factors for sexual assault, including age and alcohol consumption (Medical Xpress)
Nurse management: Open source or old school? (By Keith Carlson)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 

Forensic Nurses News
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Disclaimer: Forensic Nurses News is a weekly roundup of articles of interest to those who practice forensic nursing. This email may contain an advertisement of the International Association of Forensic Nurses and/or third party products and services. Opinions expressed in these articles do not necessarily reflect the views of Forensic Nurses or its advertising partners. Forensic Nursing News is compiled by MultiBriefs, a division of MultiView, Inc. Factual errors are the responsibility of the listed publication.

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