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Elite quarterbacks are committing and enrolling earlier
USA Today
College football teams are engaged in a new arms race. Eric Zeier was a pioneer when he committed early to Georgia and enrolled in January of 1990, just weeks after being named to the ALL-USA first team following his senior season at Marietta, Georgia. Casey Clausen and Philip Rivers were rarities when they committed early and enrolled early in 2000. But what was once unusual is now the norm.
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NHSCA Sports Hour looks ahead to Junior National Diving Championships
NHSCA
On tonight's edition of the NHSCA Sports Hour, host Jeff Fisher talks with Laguana Beach HS diver Liv Mitchell as she prepares for the Junior National Diving Championships in Orlando, Florida. You can list to the show LIVE beginning at 6PM Eastern Time at artistfirst.com/nhsca.htm.
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Use of defensive shifts is spreading — because it works
Los Angeles Times
The strategy of the infield shift might not be new, but the frequency with which it is now deployed is off the charts. The number of shifts has nearly doubled every year since 2011, from 2,357 to 13,298 last year, according to Baseball Info Solutions. And there has been another spike this season, to 10,262 by the All-Star break. Data indicates the shifts are working throughout baseball. The strategy saved 190 runs in the first half this season, according to estimates from Baseball Info Solutions.
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Targeting, unnecessary roughness still tough calls for football refs
Fort Worth Star-Telegram
A quiet conference room on the bottom floor of a nice hotel in Irving, Texas. A projector and a white screen. Ten slow-motion hard hits from the 2014 college football season. Make a call, guys. Legal or not? For 90 minutes, most of the hands that go up are right. But in the heat of a game, there still might not be a tougher call for officials than recognizing violations of the NCAA's targeting and the NFL's unnecessary roughness rules.
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Fitness motivation: The real secret to total transformation
By Jeff White
For many of us, getting in shape is difficult, and staying in shape is even harder. We work so hard to get the results we want, only to lose those gains as soon as we get them. Then there are those who get so frustrated they quit because they think they will never reach their fitness goals. It is estimated a whopping 50 percent of people who start exercising quit within the first six months. Getting in shape seems to be getting more and more difficult, but why?
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How a 16-year-old inspired Nike to create a shoe for the physically disabled
USA Today
In some ways Florida teenager Matthew Walzer is a lot like any other 19-year-old. He's obsessed with sports, particularly basketball, and is particularly fond of basketball shoes. That's where the similarities end, because while he may be particularly fond of them, Walzer isn't able to put shoes on himself; he was born with cerebral palsy, and as the disease has advanced he has had to enlist the help of relatives and others to complete relatively every day tasks like putting on shoes.'
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Tennessee votes to keep public vs. private status quo
Knoxville News-Sentinel
The Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association narrowly eluded a drastic shift in its athletic landscape, while still maintaining a vision to level the playing field among its member schools. The state organization's legislative council voted 5-4 against a complete separation of public and private schools at the Murfreesboro Doubletree Hotel, ending a debate, at least for now, that reached a crescendo when Lewis County and Trousdale County moved the issue onto the table in March 2014.
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NY eyes transgender guidelines for high school sports
Democrat & Chronicle
Transgender boys and girls in high schools across New York soon could find it easier to compete on either the boys or girls teams, whichever aligns with their gender identity. New York is by no means the first state to take action, but the Empire State would be among the most inclusive, experts say. Guidelines to be voted on later this month — setting out procedures for a biological male who transitions to female to try out for and play on a girls team and vice versa — ask schools to obtain minimal documentation on a student's gender identity.
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How can we prevent explosion of ACL injuries among young athletes?
Small Newspaper Group via The Times
The recent arrival of Tim Hewett, the newly appointed director of sports medicine research and biomechanics at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, pushes its Rochester and Minneapolis sports medicine programs toward a national leadership position in a separate area and growing public health problem: How do we prevent the explosion of ACL injuries among young athletes in the first place? It's no idle question. Not only is the rise of ACL surgery debilitating, painful and costly, it dramatically increases the risk of osteoarthritis later in life if the athlete chooses to go back to the planting and leaping sports like soccer and basketball in which it commonly occurs.
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Football coaches focus on tackling to improve safety
Denton Record-Chronicle
Football coaches have faced the challenge of protecting players by attacking the issue from every angle. One point of emphasis is teaching young players how to tackle safely. Players are taught to never initiate a tackle with their heads down, as it could result in catastrophic head or spinal injuries. Everyone agrees on that point, but the game has changed.
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What's the driving force behind fitness technology? Millennials
By Suzanne Mason
According to a new survey, about 25 percent of millennials consider eating right and exercising an important part in maintaining their health, compared to less than 15 percent of Generation X and baby boomers. As a result, many millennials are turning to apps and wearable technology to stay fit. Sales of fitness trackers continue to climb because of millennials seeing technology as a personalized tool to keep track of their health goals.
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Why we play sports: Winning motivates, but can backfire, too
NPR
A recent poll NPR did with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health found that a solid majority of adults in the U.S. who play sports — 56 percent — say that winning is important to them, too. Fifty-four percent of adults who play sports say they always or often push themselves to their physical limits, and 85 percent say their performance is important to them.
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For kids with injured ankles, less treatment may be more
American College of Emergency Physicians via Medical Xpress
Emergency physicians can safely reduce x-rays in children with hurt ankles by as much as 23 percent and save emergency patients both money and time. "Our findings are good news for the two million American and Canadian children with hurt ankles who visit emergency departments each year: although most currently receive x-rays, many do not actually need them," said Dr. Kathy Boutis of The Hospital for Sick Children and the University of Toronto in Toronto.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Brain possibly the biggest beneficiary of exercise (Chicago Tribune via The Dallas Morning News)
Study: Banning headers only part of stopping concussions (The Associated Press via USA Today)
The best form of cardio just keeps getting better (The Huffington Post)
Dugout blamed for injury that cost school $1 million (Athletic Management)
Tennessee team forfeits season over player's physical (Knoxville News-Sentinel via Athletic Business)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 



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