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TOP STORIES

Cell fusion studies at Johns Hopkins could lead to improved treatments for muscular dystrophy
The Medical News
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have established a high-efficiency cell-cell fusion system, providing a new model to study how fusion works. The scientists showed that fusion between two cells is not equal and mutual as some assumed, but, rather, is initiated and driven by one of the fusion partners. The discovery, they say, could lead to improved treatments for muscular dystrophy, since muscle regeneration relies on cell fusion to make muscle fibers that contain hundreds or even thousands of nuclei.
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Promising new drug treats and protects against radiotherapy-associated oral mucositis
Science Codex
Mouse model studies show that administered genetically or topically, protein Smad7 protects against or heals mouth sores commonly associated with cancer treatment. In some cancer patients treated with radiation, the mouth sores known as oral mucositis become so severe that feeding tubes are required for nutrition and narcotics are needed for pain. In fact, 40-70 percent of patients treated with upper-body radiation develop the condition to some degree.
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Sponsored Content


Ovarian cancer may arise from stem-like cells
Medical News Today
Scientists have discovered that the ovary contains a group of cells similar to stem cells that can mutate to form tumors. In a study of mouse ovaries, they found they could coax the stem-like cells to become cancerous by switching off two tumor-suppressing genes. The study is likely to make a significant contribution to what we know about ovarian cancer.
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New IBM healthcare analytics software helps move doctors to predictive medicine; may create opportunities for pathologists to add value
Dark Daily
Pathologists and clinical laboratory administrators should stay alert to the effect on the traditional role of pathology with increasingly effective, predictive clinical decision-support software. To support the transition to predictive healthcare — and in a move that is a separate but parallel initiative to its Watson healthcare program — IBM recently unveiled its new healthcare analytics software.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Human on Human Detection Kits

GBI Labs’s Klear Human Polymer Detection kits can detect human primary antibody on human tissue with no background. It is a biotin-free system. Special blocking buffer and human antibody enhancer are used to provide excellent sensitivity and high specificity. MORE
 


Biological tooth replacement — a step closer
HealthCanal.com
New research published in the Journal of Dental Research describes an advance in efforts to develop a method to replace missing teeth with new bioengineered teeth generated from a person's own gum cells. The research is led by professor Paul Sharpe, an expert in craniofacial development and stem cell biology at King's College London's Dental Institute.
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NSH NEWS


Spring training is well under way!
NSH
We are anxiously awaiting Opening Day for our Birds here at the Yard in Baltimore on April 5. However, NSH has a number of Home Team Events to keep our focus over the next few months. The Carolina Symposium scheduled April 5-6 has a fantastic lineup of speakers guaranteed to hit a home run for you and your lab in Charlotte. So don't drop the ball; register today!
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Viva Las Vegas!
NSH
"Bright light city gonna set my soul, gonna set my soul on fire!" That's right we are at it again. The 6th Annual Summer Symposium will be hosted in the city where we break all the rules. Viva Las Vegas! Who says what happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas? The histology jackpot you bring home to the lab is sure to keep them talking for a very long time. So join the winners circle; register today!
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On the road again...
NSH
"Just can't wait to get on the road again." The life we love is meeting with our friends. Yes, you heard it here, NSH is coming to a state meeting near you. Many of our state society friends have invited us back for the spring meeting season. Please be sure to visit our booth for some fun give aways, learn more about NSH, purchase a text book or just say "hello."
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  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
New SOX-11 (MRQ-58) for MCL!

SOX-11 expression is specific for the identification of cyclin D1 negative mantle cell lymphoma. SOX-11 is useful due to its high expression in cyclin D1 positive and negative MCL. Many B-cell lymphomas can mimic MCL; therefore, it’s important to have additional antibodies to detect cyclin D1 negative MCL. Learn More.
Spring Bioscience - BRAF V600E


Spring Bioscience is leading the research industry by pioneering novel, next generation antibodies that can differentiate mutant and normal protein, enabling pathologists to see relevant mutations within their cellular context. Having already released Exon19 and EGFR L858R for exclusive use by Ventana Medical Systems, Spring Bioscience has launched BRAF V600E.
Click here to find out more.
StatClick™ Specimen Transport Vials

We’ve added a click and removed the leak. Turn the lid until it clicks. Ship with confidence that your samples and your reputation will stay perfectly preserved. To learn more, please visit us at: www.statlab.com/statclick or contact us at 800-442-3573.


IN THE NEWS


Signaling molecule may help stem cells focus on making bone despite age, disease
Medical College of Georgia via Medical Xpress
A signaling molecule that helps stem cells survive in the naturally low-oxygen environment inside the bone marrow may hold clues to helping the cells survive when the going gets worse with age and disease, researchers report. They hope the findings, reported in PLOS ONE, will result in better therapies to prevent bone loss in aging and enhance success of stem cell transplants for a wide variety of conditions from heart disease to cerebral palsy and cancer.
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New algorithm improves accuracy of computer screening for thyroid disease
Dark Daily
It's long been predicted that use of computer algorithms to sift through clinical data sets can be one way to detect disease. This is a diagnostic method that — in theory — could either increase or decrease the need to perform medical laboratory tests for certain types of diseases. A paper recently published by researchers in India describes an improved algorithm to detect thyroid disease by computer screening. The advancement could lead to earlier detection of subclinical thyroid problems and allow for earlier diagnosis and intervention.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Everything illuminated: New method to light up pieces of cancer puzzle (Wired)
Histotechnology Professionals Day — March 10 (NSH)
Update on new federal regulations affecting clinical pathology laboratories (Dark Daily)
Human-like ears grown from cartilage cells printed on a 3-D printer (EmpowHER)
Researchers improve NanoVelcro device to better grab cancer cells as blood passes by them (The Medical News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Researchers pair experiments with computer models to peer into cells
University of Warwick via PhysOrg
BBSRC-funded researchers have developed a new strategy that can give scientists a better insight into how complex molecular machineries function in living cells. In research published in the journal Molecular Systems Biology, the team from the University of Warwick, Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocenter and Liverpool University, showed how to extract in vivo information about how complex molecular systems in yeast cells are controlled.
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  FEATURED COMPANIES
In situ RNA hybridization assays
QuantiGene® ViewRNA Assays are out-of-the-box solutions for multiplex in situ hybridization of your genes. Same slide can be visualized under brightfield and fluorescence. View publications.
Milestone
Milestone was founded in 1988 as a company specializing in advanced microwave instrumentation for analytical and organic chemistry labs. MORE


Tiny piece of RNA regulate earliest stages of life
Ohio State University via Laboratory Equipment
New research shows that a tiny piece of RNA has an essential role in ensuring that embryonic tissue segments form properly. The study, conducted in chicken embryos, determined that this piece of RNA regulates cyclical gene activity that defines the timing of the formation of tissue segments that later become muscle and vertebrae. Genes involved in this activity are turned on and off in an oscillating pattern that matches the formation of each tissue segment. If the timing of these genes' activity doesn't remain tightly regulated, the tissue either won't form at all or will form with defects.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Stellaris RNA FISH Probes

Stellaris RNA FISH is a new research technology that enables direct detection, localization and quantification of RNA. The low cost per assay, simple protocol, and the ability to localize mRNA and lncRNA to organelles and cellular structures provides obvious benefits for life science research. Custom and catalogued probes sets available. MORE
 


Cell positioning uses 'good design'
Evolution News & Views
Without eyes and ears, how does a cell know its position? One cell biologist found good design principles at work in the way cells learn about their environment for making decisions. Arthur D. Lander, of the Department of Developmental and Cell Biology, Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Complex Biological Systems at the University of California-Irvine, wrote an intriguing article for Science about a road less traveled in microbiology.
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Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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