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TOP STORIES

This protein could change biotech forever
Forbes
A tiny molecular machine used by bacteria to kill attacking viruses could change the way that scientists edit the DNA of plants, animals and fungi, revolutionizing genetic engineering. The protein, called Cas9, is quite simply a way to more accurately cut a piece of DNA.
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Dual cell approach may bring universal flu shot
University of Pennsylvania via Laboratory Equipment
Seasonal epidemics of influenza result in nearly 36,000 deaths annually in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control. Current vaccines against the influenza virus elicit an antibody response specific for proteins on the outside of the virus, specifically the hemagglutinin protein. Yearly vaccines are made by growing the flu virus in eggs. The viral envelope proteins, including HA, are cleaved off and used as the vaccine, but vary from year to year, depending on what flu strains are prevalent.
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Team achieves tenfold boost in ability to find proteins in cancer cells
University of Washington via R&D Magazine
Better diagnosis and treatment of cancer could hinge on the ability to better understand a single cell at its molecular level. New research offers a more comprehensive way of analyzing one cell's unique behavior, using an array of colors to show patterns that could indicate why a cell will or won't become cancerous.
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Cell on a chip sheds light on protein behavior
Weizmann Institute via Laboratory Equipment
For years, scientists around the world have dreamed of building a complete, functional, artificial cell. Though this vision is still a distant blur on the horizon, many are making progress on various fronts. Professor Roy Bar-Ziv and his research team in the Weizmann Institute's Materials and Interfaces Department recently took a significant step in this direction when they created a two-dimensional, cell-like system on a glass chip.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Hu-on-Hu & Ms-on-Ms Ab Detection

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NSH NEWS


NSH representative to CLSI, Janet Kliethermes provides an update
NSH
The CLSI Leadership conference was held this month in Arlington, Va. The theme of their educational symposium was "Embracing Molecular Diagnostics and Genome Sequencing." What began in 1990 with the Human Genome Project is now on a path to revolutionize how medicine is practiced. Every disease can be mapped back to some genetic influence. Currently a single gene is implicated in about 4,800 different diseases. Advances in technology are driving the science of genomes forward in clinical treatment, personalized medicine and pharmacogenomics to identify patients that will have toxic side effects to different medicines.
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Journal of Histotechnology March issue now online
NSH
The most recent issue of the Journal of Histotechnology is now online. As a member of NSH, you can access the full issue through your MY NSH Account. Click here for the current article; it's also available through Open Access. If you are interested in other articles in the JOH, these can be accessed by joining NSH Today.
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  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
New SOX-11 (MRQ-58) for MCL!

SOX-11 expression is specific for the identification of cyclin D1 negative mantle cell lymphoma. SOX-11 is useful due to its high expression in cyclin D1 positive and negative MCL. Many B-cell lymphomas can mimic MCL; therefore, it’s important to have additional antibodies to detect cyclin D1 negative MCL. Learn More.
Spring Bioscience - BRAF V600E


Spring Bioscience is leading the research industry by pioneering novel, next generation antibodies that can differentiate mutant and normal protein, enabling pathologists to see relevant mutations within their cellular context. Having already released Exon19 and EGFR L858R for exclusive use by Ventana Medical Systems, Spring Bioscience has launched BRAF V600E.
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StatClick™ Specimen Transport Vials

We’ve added a click and removed the leak. Turn the lid until it clicks. Ship with confidence that your samples and your reputation will stay perfectly preserved. To learn more, please visit us at: www.statlab.com/statclick or contact us at 800-442-3573.


IN THE NEWS


Stem cell research could expand clinical use of regenerative human cells
Indiana University via Medical Xpress
Research led by a biology professor in the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis has uncovered a method to produce retinal cells from regenerative human stem cells without the use of animal products, proteins or other foreign substances, which historically have limited the application of stem cells to treat disease and other human developmental disorders.
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White blood cells found to play key role in controlling red blood cell levels
e! Science News
Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have found that macrophages — white blood cells that play a key role in the immune response — also help to both produce and eliminate the body's red blood cells. The findings could lead to novel therapies for diseases or conditions in which the red blood cell production is thrown out of balance. The study, conducted in mice, is published in the online edition of the journal Nature Medicine.
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Mice get brain boost from transplanted human tissue
Science News
Transplanting human brain cells into mice makes the mice smarter, a new study shows. But the smart-making brain cells are not the nerve cells most people think of as controlling thoughts. Instead, they are part of the supporting cast of brain cells known as glia (Greek for "glue").
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Cell fusion studies at Johns Hopkins could lead to improved treatments for muscular dystrophy (The Medical News)
Ovarian cancer may arise from stem-like cells (Medical News Today)
New IBM healthcare analytics software helps move doctors to predictive medicine (Dark Daily)
On the road again... (NSH)
Cell positioning uses 'good design' (Evolution News & Views)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


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In situ RNA hybridization assays
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Researchers spot molecular control switch for preterm lung disorders
HealthCanal.com
In a mouse study, the team located key molecules that switch on stress pathways in preterm lung disorders, and also found that when parts of these pathways were blocked with a pain drug, lung damage was prevented or reversed. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia is the most common chronic lung disease in premature infants and does not have any specific treatment. The disorder affects about 97 percent of infants with birth weights below 1,250 grams and can lead to repeated respiratory tract infections, as well as to emphysema and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adulthood.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Stellaris RNA FISH Probes

Stellaris RNA FISH is a new research technology that enables direct detection, localization and quantification of RNA. The low cost per assay, simple protocol, and the ability to localize mRNA and lncRNA to organelles and cellular structures provides obvious benefits for life science research. Custom and catalogued probes sets available. MORE
 


FDA approves imaging drug for cancer lymph nodes
The Associated Press via USA Today
The Food and Drug Administration has approved a new imaging drug to help doctors locate lymph nodes in patients with breast cancer and skin cancer. The drug Lymphoseek from Navidea Biopharmaceuticals Inc. is a radioactive imaging agent that is intended to help determine if breast cancer or melanoma has spread to a patient's lymph nodes. By surgically removing lymph nodes that drain from a tumor, doctors can sometimes detect if a cancer has spread from its original site.
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US study: Bitter melon juice kills pancreatic cancer cells
BeverageDaily.com
Scientists based in U.S. claim their new study shows that bitter melon juice has strong efficacy against human pancreatic carcinoma cells without noticeable side effects, and urge its "clinical usefulness."
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Under the Microscope
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