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NSH NEWS

Symposium/Convention early-bird registration rate ends July 31
NSH
Register now before the registration rate increases to $130 for members and $210 for nonmembers.
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The Forum on Immunohistochemistry will present 'The Use of Immunohistochemistry for the Detection of Gene Alterations — Is There a Role for IHC in the Molecular Era?'
NSH
July 18
Join us in Tennessee for the eighth annual IHC Forum. Adjuvant treatment for certain types of cancer is being "personalized" based on the presence or absence of specific gene mutations or rearrangements (e.g., KRAS, EGFR, ROS1, ALK, etc.). This complex testing is currently being performed in hospitals with molecular/cytogenetics laboratories, reference laboratories and private companies. The pathology community is now seeing the availability of monoclonal antibodies that target these mutation-specific or fusion-specific proteins. This presentation will cover the pros and cons of using immunohistochemistry for the detection of these gene alterations. Learn more.

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July 22 laboratory webinar — How to Integrate HistoQIP into a Quality Management Program
NSH
Quality assurance involves continuous monitoring of technical and medical procedures and is an essential part of a well-developed quality management program. The Histology Quality Improvement Program (HistoQIP) allows the user to monitor the quality of technical work performed and compare the quality to recognized standards and peers. In addition, HistoQIP provides referenced solutions to common problems allowing for quality improvement changes for identified quality variances. Register now.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  GBI Cost Effective Products

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TOP STORIES


Lab-made blood to enter human trials in 2 years
Medical News Today
Artificial blood grown in a lab from stem cells is one step closer to being available to people with complex blood types for whom it is difficult to find matching donors. The U.K.'s National Health Service Blood and Transplant say manufactured blood will be used in clinical trials with human volunteers within two years. The aim is one of several that the joint England and Wales special health authority has entered into with top universities to develop transfusion, transplantation and regenerative medicine over the next five years.
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'Nighthawk' radiology services expand to hospital pharmacies: Could pathology labs be next?
Dark Daily
Over the past 15 years, pathologists have watched how radiology has been disrupted by the "nighthawk" model of remote teleradiology services. Now, the nighthawk approach to telepharmacy could disrupt pharmacy as well. As this happens, pathologists may be wondering when their medical specialty will see its first "nighthawk pathology" disruptors.
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Better clinical devices are dependent on lab research
Laboratory Equipment
Instruments for electrophysiology research are designed to measure the electrical properties of biological cells and tissues. They record voltage change or electric current on a variety of scales, from single ion channel proteins to entire organs. Researchers use these instruments in many ways, for example, to understand the molecular events that control excitation in cardiac muscle. Ultimately, such research could provide a clearer understanding of the cellular basis of cardiac arrhythmias and their mechanisms.
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UVA Health System opens high-tech clinical genomics lab
News-Medical.Net
The University of Virginia Health System has opened a high-tech clinical genomics lab that will personalize care for patients, help doctors determine the best treatments for cancers and other diseases, and allow UVA to offer the most cutting-edge clinical trials. The new lab, under the direction of Mani S. Mahadevan, M.D., professor in the Department of Pathology, gives doctors the power to examine patients' DNA quickly and effectively. By so doing, they can diagnose genetic disorders, identify cancer-causing gene mutations and tailor treatments for maximum effectiveness.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Hassle Free Block Storage Cabinet

Avantik Biogroup is proud to introduce another Customer Requested Quality Innovation for Histology...the Avantik Biogroup Block Storage Cabinet! We introduced Hassle-Free Drawer Technology with Interlocking Stackability and More Clearance between the top of the blocks and the drawers to achieve the industry's first Jam-Free, Hassle-Free Block Storage Cabinet!
 


IN THE NEWS


Wearable health-monitoring devices could alter traditional role of pathologists as gatekeepers of medical lab test data
Dark Daily
Traditionally, medical laboratories have been the gatekeepers for the lab test data of most patients. After all, it is regularly said that 70 percent or more of a patient's permanent health record is made up of clinical laboratory test data. However, several market forces are at play that could eat away at the long-standing role of medical laboratories as the primary gatekeepers of patient test data.
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Editing stem cell genes will 'revolutionize' biomedical research
Phys.Org
Applying a dramatically improved method for "editing" genes to human stem cells, University of Wisconsin-Madison professor of neuroscience Su-Chun Zhang has shown a new way to silence genes in stem cells and their progeny at any stage of development. The advance has advantages in speed and efficiency, says Zhang, and is already being used for basic biological studies.
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Effective use of foreign clinical trial data: Best practice considerations
Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry
The potential to reduce overall costs has many medical device companies exploring the use of clinical trial data generated outside the United States to support their regulatory filings for market clearance or approval. FDA recently issued draft guidance, "Acceptance of Medical Device Clinical Data from Studies Conducted Outside the United States," to assist device manufacturers in setting up acceptable OUS clinical trials. Here are a few best practices to consider when developing OUS studies to support U.S. regulatory filings.
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6 laboratory tasks supplanted by automation
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
The global market for lab automation is set to grow over the next five years into a $5.10 billion industry by 2020, MarketsandMarkets projected recently, based on a 2014 figure of $3.47 billion and projected compound annual growth rate of 6.7 percent from this year. However, Kalorama is more even upbeat. They reported total sales of $5.4 billion in lab automation systems sold to clinical labs alone in 2014.
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Changing lab operations
Lab Manager
From the ancient prophets of the Bible to Nostradamus in the Middle Ages to modern day "psychics," people have always had a natural curiosity about the future, and just about everyone has speculated as to what it will be like. However, even modest predictions that seemed perfectly reasonable at the time have a way of missing the mark — the one thing that we know for certain about the future is that it will bring change in unexpected ways.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    University installs most powerful microscope in the US (Lab Manager)
New stem cell research uncovers causes of spinal muscular atrophy (Royal Holloway, University of London via Medical Xpress)
July 22 laboratory webinar — How to Integrate HistoQIP into a Quality Management Program (NSH)
Scanadu preparing consumer self-test device for review by FDA as part of its mission to enable patients to monitor their health without need for clinical pathology lab tests (Dark Daily)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642   
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