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NSH NEWS

The Symposium/Convention early-bird registration rate ends July 31 — register now!
NSH
Registration rate increases to $130 for members and $210 for nonmembers Aug. 1. Click here to register.
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Get connected: Live webinar series
NSH
Can't join us in D.C. for the Annual Symposium/Convention? You can but others from your lab can't? We have an option for you. The National Society for Histotechnology has selected six convention workshops to broadcast live via webinar during the convention. This series gives histology professionals who cannot attend the live event a chance to experience some of the education offered during the week. Find out more.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  GBI Cost Effective Products

GBI Labs produces the largest selection of secondary detection kits, from single to multiple detection kits, with wide range host species. We provide FREE samples to 1st time users. Staining with our kits results in similar or better sensitivity than other detection kits on the market with 20%-30% cost less.
 


'Stuff Your Suitcase' — Donate children's books!
NSH
Each year the NSH Convention Committee teams up with the Local Host Committee to help a charitable organization in the convention's host city. The Region II Local Host Committee is asking you to join us and the United Way in supporting early and middle grade student success in our communities. So stuff our suitcase with children's books for the United Way of Central Maryland and the National Capital Area for Read, Learn, Succeed! Donate children's books appropriate for ages 3-13 — in particular bilingual books/Spanish text and books that exhibit different cultures.
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TOP STORIES


The future of healthcare: Hacking, hospitals, technology and more
The Wall Street Journal
Sure, no one can predict the future. But it is fun to surmise where technology and innovation may take us. And with healthcare, how people will interact with doctors, how lives may be extended and diseases eradicated. So The Wall Street Journal asked the The Experts, a group of medical and healthcare professionals, to speak on what they think the future holds for healthcare.
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Universal flu vaccine in the works
American Society for Microbiology via Medical Xpress
Each year, scientists create a flu vaccine that protects against a few specific influenza strains that researchers predict are going to be the most common during that year. Now, a new study shows that scientists may be able to create a "universal" vaccine that can provide broad protection against numerous influenza strains, including those that could cause future pandemics.
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Genetic study produced new insights into gene function and disease predisposition that could lead to new clinical lab tests
Dark Daily
Over the past 15 years, Iceland has managed to be at the forefront of genetic research tied to personalized medicine and new biomarkers for diagnostics and therapeutics. This is true because as most pathologists know, Iceland has a small population that has seen little immigration over the past 1,000 years, along with a progressive government and business community. The relatively closed society of Iceland makes it much easier to identify genetic sequences that contribute to different diseases.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Hassle Free Block Storage Cabinet

Avantik Biogroup is proud to introduce another Customer Requested Quality Innovation for Histology...the Avantik Biogroup Block Storage Cabinet! We introduced Hassle-Free Drawer Technology with Interlocking Stackability and More Clearance between the top of the blocks and the drawers to achieve the industry's first Jam-Free, Hassle-Free Block Storage Cabinet!
 


The incidental findings debate
ADVANCE for Laboratory
The Association for Molecular Pathology is offering a new perspective from the laboratory, highlighting the need for increased understanding and transparency of complex genomic testing. It also outlines important recommendations, including the need for laboratories to establish clear and patient-friendly policies for delivering ancillary information generated from genome-wide genetic tests.
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IN THE NEWS


Will trial results for Lilly and Biogen Alzheimer's drugs be hard to forget?
The Wall Street Journal
Depending upon the outcomes of studies about to be released, this may be a week that drugs being developed to combat Alzheimer's will be hard to forget. Two efforts from Eli Lilly and Biogen, in particular, are drawing considerable attention. Lilly will unveil results of a clinical trial of a medicine that will help signal whether the drug cannot only overcome earlier, negative studies, but become the first marketed treatment to slow the worsening of the underlying disease, The Wall Street Journal notes.
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Troubleshooting chromatography systems
Lab Manager
Josephine Ferreon is an assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacology, Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. Her structural biology group characterizes various intrinsically disordered proteins, important in stem cell biology and neurodegenerative diseases, using standard and state-of-the-art biochemical/biophysical techniques such as NMR and single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy.
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Sequencing the genome creates so much data we don't know what to do with it
The Washington Post
Get ready for some incomprehensibly big numbers. Scientists are predicting that genomics — the field of sequencing human DNA — will soon take the lead as the biggest data beast in the world, eventually creating more digital information than astronomy, particle physics and even popular Internet sites like YouTube. The claim, published in a PLOS Biology study, is a testament to the awesome complexity of the human genome, but it also illustrates a pressing challenge for the 15-year-old field.
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From lab bench to hospital bedside, faster
The San Diego Union-Tribune
After a headline-making medical discovery is announced, and before a treatment reaches patients, a long and treacherous road intervenes. It's that ill-defined path that starts with the publication of scientific papers and ends when a potential therapy passes human clinical trials. The years, labor and expense that begin when the glow wears off can wear down scientists, exhaust executives and cause investors to close their wallets.
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Acupuncture impacts same biologic pathways in rats that pain drugs target in humans
Georgetown University Medical Center via Medical Xpress
In animal models, acupuncture appears to impact the same biologic pathways ramped up by pain and stress, analogous to what drugs do in humans. Georgetown University Medical Center researchers say their animal study, published online in Endocrinology, provides the strongest evidence to date on the mechanism of this ancient Chinese therapy in chronic stress.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    University installs most powerful microscope in the US (Lab Manager)
New stem cell research uncovers causes of spinal muscular atrophy (Royal Holloway, University of London via Medical Xpress)
July 22 laboratory webinar — How to Integrate HistoQIP into a Quality Management Program (NSH)
Scanadu preparing consumer self-test device for review by FDA as part of its mission to enable patients to monitor their health without need for clinical pathology lab tests (Dark Daily)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642   
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