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NSH NEWS

Get connected: 2014 Symposium/Convention Live Webinar Series
NSH
Unable to join us in Austin next month? The NSH is happy to announce its brand new Symposium/Convention Live Webinar Series. This series gives histology professionals who cannot attend the live event a chance to attend workshops right from your own home or office. All you need is a computer with speakers and internet access and you're ready to go! Click here to learn more and register online.
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Volunteer at this year's Symposium/Convention
NSH
The Symposium/Convention is a large event and requires all hands on deck to be successful. Volunteering is a great way to get involved in NSH and be a part of NSH's premier educational event. NSH awards up to two contact hours per year for volunteering at NSH events or on NSH projects. Learn more.
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To help physicians and patients, medical labs with BRCA breast cancer tests are posting mutation data into ClinVar's BRCA database
Dark Daily
There's a new development in the longstanding battle over proprietary healthcare data versus public sharing of such information. Pathologists and clinical laboratory managers will be interested to learn that, when it comes to genetic testing of the BRCA mutation involved in breast cancer, a public data base of mutations is growing so rapidly that it may become the world’s largest repository of such information.
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Noninvasive advanced image analysis may improve care for lung cancer patients
Oncology Nurse Advisor
Lung cancer patients could receive more precise treatment, and their progress could be better tracked by using a new high-tech method of non-invasive medical imaging analysis, according to a new study. Genetic changes increasingly are recognized as driving cancer development. But obtaining evidence of these changes usually requires a biopsy, which can be problematic for sensitive regions of the body such as the lungs.
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Researchers develop a pioneering mobile application for portable analysis of DNA sequences
Phys.org
A*STAR molecular cell biologist Samuel Gan was in the midst of an exasperating work trip in Shanghai, China. Away from his office, his email inbox was filling up with DNA sequencing files that needed his urgent attention. Gan's research group in Singapore is engaged in therapeutic antibody production and had engineered DNA molecules known as plasmids to transmit protein-encoding information into cells. Before the plasmids could be introduced into cells, however, their DNA sequences had to be determined and verified. But with no way to interpret these sequences on his smartphone, Gan was unable to instruct his team back home to begin the next stage of producing antibodies.
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Targeted virus could boost chemo's effects for arm and leg cancer
Medical News Today
Patients with cancer of the arms and legs often undergo chemotherapy to avoid amputation. Now, researchers from The Institute of Cancer Research in London, U.K., say that viruses designed to target and then kill cancer cells could increase the effectiveness of these chemotherapy treatments.
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Scientists cut HIV directly out of infected human genome using
molecular tools

The Independent
Scientists have taken an "important step" towards a permanent cure for AIDS by using specially designed enzymes to physically cut the HIV virus out of an infected human genome. The breakthrough research by a team of scientists from Temple University School of Medicine uses a pair of molecular tools to achieve its goal: a "targeting strand" of RNA which locates the virus and a "DNA snipping" enzyme that removes it. The virus-free cell then repairs itself.
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IN THE NEWS


Simulated human heart used to test drugs' effects
Medical News Today
Heart-related side effects of drugs are often only exposed once the drug is used on patients in clinical trials, at which point it is too late. But a scientist in the U.K. has spent 10 years developing a breakthrough new way to safely test a drug's cardiovascular effects without having to use human or animal trials — by using samples of beating heart tissue.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  ergoCentric Laboratory Seating

Visit LabStorage System’s updated website to view details about this new laboratory seating with specially formulated Infection Control coating. Non-porous and easily disinfected, this moisture proof coating is anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and stain resistant. more
 


Report raises red flags on Medicare lab billing
The Wall Street Journal
Medicare allowed $1.7 billion in 2010 payments to clinical laboratories for claims that raised red flags, according to a recent report, the latest example of how the federal insurance program for the elderly and disabled is susceptible to misspending and abuse. The report, by the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Inspector General, found that more than 1,000 laboratories showed five or more measures of questionable billing during that year, the latest available when the office began compiling the data. That includes various metrics signifying higher-than-average billing, using ineligible physician identification numbers and administering duplicate tests, among other things.
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Using EMR databases to conduct clinical research
By Maria Frisch
Electronic medical records contain enormous amounts of information that could be used in clinical research and quality improvement. However, ethical concerns — such as patient consent and minimization of reidentification — abound. For those accessing records tied to clinics, hospitals, insurance companies and similar organizations, multiple databases are typically accessed to pull records. Utilization of this data often involves approval from an institutional review board and documentation of HIPAA compliance.
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Pathologist Michael LaPosata, MD, delivers the message about diagnostic management teams and clinical laboratory testing to attendees at Arizona meeting
Dark Daily
Most pathologists and clinical laboratory scientists are quick to agree that over utilization of medical laboratory tests is a major problem in healthcare. But under utilization of medical lab tests is an equally significant problem. That's the message delivered recently by pathologist Michael Laposata, M.D., Ph.D., during a presentation he delivered at the Sunquest Executive Summit.
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Cholesterol activates signaling pathway that promotes cancer
Medical Xpress
Everyone knows that cholesterol, at least the bad kind, can cause heart disease and hardening of the arteries. Now, researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago describe a new role for cholesterol in the activation of a cellular signaling pathway that has been linked to cancer.
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Blood test might help predict survival with Lou Gehrig's disease
HealthDay News viaThe Inquirer
Simple blood tests may one day help predict survival and the course of the disease in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also called Lou Gehrig's disease, Italian researchers report. The components in the blood that might yield clues to how fast ALS is progressing are called albumin and creatinine. These components are normally tested to follow kidney and liver health, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Ticking viral bombs, left in boxes (The New York Times)
NSH Laboratory Webinar: Rapid and Efficient Tissue Processing with Microwave Technology (NSH)
New study helps scientists understand melanoma development (Medical Xpress)
Download the NSH event mobile app! (NSH)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642   
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