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NSH NEWS

NSH Uniform Labeling of Slides and Blocks in Surgical Pathology — an update at the NSH Symposium/Convention
NSH
The College of American Pathologists and the National Society for Histotechnology have partnered to produce guidelines for the Uniform Labeling of Slides and Blocks in Surgical Pathology. Join Vinnie Della Speranza, MS, HTL(ASCP), from 7:15-8 a.m. Monday, Aug. 25 to discuss the origins of the project and the conclusions the committee has drawn based on its research and surveying.
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Social networking at the #NSHSC
NSH
Are you joining us in Austin this year? Remember to like our official event Facebook page and follow us on twitter, @NS4Histotech to share your experiences before, during and after the event. Share photos of you and your peers or simply post any updates online using the hashtag #NSHSC.
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Anti-cancer lymphatic drugs show potential
Medical Xpress
Researchers at the University of Auckland are using zebrafish embryos to investigate potential medicines that will inhibit the spread of some cancers via the lymphatic system. The latest experiment used the zebrafish embryos to screen thousands of compounds to identify four potential anti-cancer drugs. The results were recently published in the journal, Molecular Cancer Therapeutics.
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New tools help neuroscientists analyze big data
Lab Manager
Big data can mean big headaches for scientists. A new library of software tools from Janelia speeds analysis of data sets so large and complex they would take days or weeks to analyze on a single workstation — if a single workstation could do it at all.
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Researcher using next-generation sequencing, other new methods to rapidly identify pathogens
Lab Manager
He calls himself the bug hunter, but the target of his work consists of viruses that can only be found and identified with special methods and instruments. Benjamin Hause, an assistant research professor at the Kansas State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at Kansas State University, recently published an article about one of his discoveries, porcine enterovirus G, which is an important find in the United States.
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FDA debates trial-data secrecy
Nature
Despite a trend toward increased transparency in clinical-trial data, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is asking whether there are times when participants and researchers should be kept in the dark. As pharmaceutical companies push for studies that first justify a drug's approval, then monitor safety once it reaches the market, the agency fears that publicizing the early data could bias the final results.
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Growth in high deductible health plans cause savvy clinical labs and pathology groups to collect full payment at time of service
Dark Daily
Due to a need to collect payment directly from the growing number of patients with high-deductible health plans, many clinical laboratories and anatomic pathology groups are experiencing flat or even declining cash flow. This issue has medical lab CFOs scrambling to find solutions. Moreover, this problem is noticeably greater in 2014 than it was in 2013. One factor behind this worrisome trend is the Affordable Care Act.
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Memory and learning deficits restored in Alzheimer's mouse models
Medical News Today
With more than 5 million Americans living with Alzheimer's disease, the race is on to develop new treatments for the condition. Now, researchers from the Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco, and the University of California-San Francisco reveal they have successfully reversed learning and memory deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's through transplantation of healthy brain cells.
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IN THE NEWS


Research team achieves in vivo monitoring of therapeutic drugs with technology pathologists could adapt for clinical diagnostic purposes
Dark Daily
Researchers at the University of California Santa Barbara are making rapid progress in designing a biosensor that can measure therapeutic levels of a prescription drug in real time within the patient. This technology has interesting implications for anatomic pathology and clinical laboratory testing. The research team has developed a small electronic device that continuously tracks the level of medicines (doxorubicin and kanamycin) in an animal's bloodstream. For pathologists and other physicians, this wireless tool can perhaps one day be used to help transform how drugs are chosen and monitored in patients.
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Visit LabStorage System’s updated website to view details about this new laboratory seating with specially formulated Infection Control coating. Non-porous and easily disinfected, this moisture proof coating is anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and stain resistant. more
 


British wound care company starting clinical trials to bring tests to US
MedCity News
Woundchek Laboratories, a British developer of diagnostic tests that gauge a wound's severity and its ability to heal, plans to soon begin U.S. clinical trials. The goal is Food and Drug Administration clearance so it can market its products stateside.
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New version of drug successfully treats lupus in mice
News-Medical.Net
Expanding on his work with a new drug that successfully treated lupus in mice, a biomedical engineer at the University of Houston has received a $250,000 grant to expand his research to a new version of the drug in an effort to treat a wider range of autoimmune diseases. Chandra Mohan, Hugh Roy and Lillie Cranz Cullen Endowed Professor of biomedical Engineering at UH, previously published a study in Arthritis Research & Therapy outlining the use of a new drug that successfully treated lupus in mice and reduced the number of cases of lupus-related kidney disease.
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Clinical trial holds promise for chronic pain sufferers
The Henderson Press
Local residents will soon begin participation in a national study with the potential to revolutionize chronic neuropathic pain treatment. Henderson/Las Vegas will be one of 25 sites nationwide hosting an investigative trial of the Axium Neurostimulator System. The system's basic strategy is to interrupt pain signals — from nerves to the brain and back through the spine into the lower limbs — with the use of a small electrical implant.
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New study looks at how epigenetic effects are passed down
Bioscience Technology
When a pregnant mother is undernourished, her child is at a greater than average risk of developing obesity and type 2 diabetes, in part due to so-called "epigenetic" effects. A new study led by an HMS researcher at Joslin Diabetes Center and a scientist at the University of Cambridge demonstrates that this "memory" of nutrition during pregnancy can be passed through sperm of male offspring to the next generation, increasing risk of disease for grandchildren as well. In other words, to adapt an old maxim, "you are what your grandmother ate."
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Scientists cut HIV directly out of infected human genome using
molecular tools
(The Independent)
Get connected: 2014 Symposium/Convention Live Webinar Series (NSH)
Report raises red flags on Medicare lab billing (The Wall Street Journal)
To help physicians and patients, medical labs with BRCA breast cancer tests are posting mutation data into ClinVar's BRCA database (Dark Daily)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642   
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