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NSH NEWS

Advanced Mohs Technician Training
NSH
NSH has partnered with Mohs Histology Consulting to offer this unique hands-on, intense training session in a Mohs lab. This workshop is designed for both the new technician just starting out and the experienced technician who wants to brush up on advanced techniques and polish their skills. Students will cut a variety of skin samples. Come spend an enjoyable and informative two days with fellow technicians in a supportive and stimulating atmosphere. Thank you to AVANTIK Biogroup for providing equipment, supplies and training facilities. Click here to register.
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TOP STORIES


US speeds up human clinical trials for promising Ebola vaccine
Los Angeles Times
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health are accelerating human clinical trials for what scientists hope is a promising new vaccine to combat the deadly Ebola virus. Phase 1 of the clinical trials, which were previously not expected to begin until the end of September, will start early next month in response to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, said Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Fauci said researchers hoped to finish Phase 1 by the end of November rather than January 2015, as originally planned.
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Better clinical trial designs could lower development costs and yield more new drugs
Forbes
The design, execution and analysis of clinical trials has become so complex that even for huge multinational drug companies with vast R&D experience, bringing a new medicine to market on average takes 12-15 years and costs well over a billion dollars. The increasing promise of personalized medicine — "the right drug for the right patient at the right time" — notwithstanding, the development of a new medicine is generally focused on the ultimate marketing to a broad range of people. (Examples include drugs like statins, anti-hypertensives, antibiotics, pain relievers and sleep-inducers, for example.)
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Researchers produce 1st map of human proteome, generating promise for developing novel medical lab tests and new therapeutics
Dark Daily
Given the growing importance of proteins in medical laboratory testing, pathologists will want to know about a major milestone recently achieved in this field. Researchers have announced that drafts of the complete human proteome have been released to the public. Experts are comparing this to the first complete map of the human genome that was made public in 2000. Clinical laboratory managers and pathologists know how the availability of this information provided the foundation for rapid advances in understanding different aspects involving DNA and RNA.
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World of 2015: Cure for arthritis may go into clinical trials next year
Science 2.0
Rheumatoid arthritis is a condition that causes painful inflammation of several joints in the body — the joint capsule becomes swollen, and the disease can also destroy cartilage and bone as it progresses. It affects 0.5 percent to 1 percent of the world's population and doctors have used various drugs to slow or stop the progression of the disease. ETH Zurich researchers have developed a therapy that takes the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in mice to a new level: after receiving the medication the animals have been fully cured.
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IN THE NEWS


Animal research: Mice win reprieve as genetic model for man
Financial Times
Do mice make good models of human disease? The extensive use of mice for medical research and drug development — more than 3 million procedures a year in the U.K. alone — assumes a positive answer, but a U.S. study last year raised doubts about the murine model in severe inflammatory conditions such as sepsis, acute infection and severe burns.
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New thinking needed for superbug treatments
By Mike Wokasch
Not a day goes by without reading or hearing about the seemingly impossible task of finding effective new treatments against "superbugs" that are resistant to existing drugs. The dearth of prospects for treating these superbugs is often blamed on the lack of investment and market economics. Sure, more investment-friendly healthcare market opportunities might lure additional pharma companies and money to the effort, but there is an even bigger factor standing in the way of conquering this medical dilemma.
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New mouse model points to therapy for liver disease
UC San Diego Health System
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a common affliction, affecting almost 30 percent of Americans, with a significant number suffering from its most severe form, called non-alcoholic steatohepatitis or NASH, which can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. In recent years, NASH has become the leading cause of liver transplantation. Development of effective new therapies for preventing or treating NASH has been stymied by limited small animal models for the disease. In a paper published online in Cancer Cell, scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine describe a novel mouse model that closely resembles human NASH and use it to demonstrate that interference with a key inflammatory protein inhibits both the development of NASH and its progression to liver cancer.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  GBI Cost Effective Products

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Cancer and the secrets of your genes
The New York Times
On Aug. 6, researchers announced in The New England Journal of Medicine that they had found that mutations in a gene called PALB2 greatly increase the risk of breast cancer. This is one of the biggest developments since the discovery of the role of mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in breast and ovarian cancer in the 1990s. The response among patients has been predictable. One woman's email summed it up: "I'd like to get an entire genome scan to rule out a hidden cancer diagnosis."
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University of Texas researchers reveal portable cancer detection device with potential to significantly reduce number of skin biopsies sent to dermatopathologists
Dark Daily
Dermatopathologists and pathology practice administrators will be keenly interested in a new, hand-held diagnostic device that is designed to reduce the need for skin biopsies. Because of high volume of skin biopsies referred to pathologists, any significant reduction in the number of such case referrals would have negative revenue impact on medical laboratories that process and diagnose these specimens.
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Clinical trial tests COXEN model in bladder cancer to find promising treatment
News-Medical.Net
Imagine being able to match a cancer's genes to the best treatment. That's the promise of COXEN (CO eXpression ExtrapolatioN) — a computer program that looks at a panel of cancer genes in a patient's tumor to predict whether it will respond to chemotherapy. Now a clinical trial recently approved by the National Cancer Institute will open at the University of Colorado Cancer Center and nationally via the Southwest Oncology Group to test the COXEN model in bladder cancer — can it predict which cancers will and which cancers will not respond to two common chemotherapies?
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An enzyme therapy may prevent skeletal abnormalities associated with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type-1
OrthoSpineNews
Vanderbilt investigators have discovered a novel treatment that strengthens bones in neurofibromatosis type-1. The researchers demonstrated in a mouse model of the disorder that the enzyme asfotase-alpha improves bone growth, mineralization and strength. The findings, reported in the journal Nature Medicine, "suggest that we can make bone stronger and better by injecting this drug, and possibly prevent fractures in patients with neurofibromatosis," said Florent Elefteriou, Ph.D., director of the Vanderbilt Center for Bone Biology.
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A possible explanation for why brain tumors are more common, and more harmful, in males
Oncology Nurse Advisor
New research helps explain why brain tumors occur more often in males and frequently are more harmful than similar tumors in females. For example, glioblastomas, the most common malignant brain tumors, are diagnosed twice as often in males, who suffer greater cognitive impairments than females and do not survive as long. The researchers found that retinoblastoma protein (RB), a protein known to reduce cancer risk, is significantly less active in male brain cells than in female brain cells.
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The growing threat of antibiotic resistance
By Rosemary Sparacio
A number of diseases once easily treatable have become resistant to antibiotics currently on the market, and that number continues to grow. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has warned that antibiotic resistance is such a serious problem that it could be the "next pandemic." Obviously, the growth of antibiotic-resistant pathogens means that more and more cases emerge where standard treatments no longer work, infections become more difficult to control, and the risk of spreading infections to others is increased — especially when hospital stays are prolonged.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Is Ebola airborne? Canadian study shows deadly evidence (By Lauren Swan)
'Parasite pill' could ease autoimmune disease symptoms ( Laboratory Equipment)
FDA approves first DNA-based test for colon cancer (The Associated Press via CNBC)
Scientists build 1st functional 3-D brain tissue model (Medical News Today)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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