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NSH NEWS

1-day Histology Forum for the veterinary and research scientist
NSH
NSH is offering a one-day Histology Forum on Nov. 1, the day before the AALAS 66th Annual Meeting in Phoenix. Forum attendees will spend the full day focused on histologic techniques and applications specific to working with animals in veterinary and research laboratories. Sessions will provide high-level troubleshooting advice covering necropsy, fixation's impact on microtomy, special stains, ISH, IHC. The day will conclude with a discussion of comparative histology addressing the use and translation of animal models of human diseases. The Forum will encourage active dialogue and is a great opportunity to expand your professional network to continue the exchange of ideas upon returning to your lab. Register now.
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Last chance to register for the HT/HTL certification prep study weekend
Oct. 3-4

NSH
Register by this Friday, Sept. 25, to participate in this study weekend designed and presented by Sarah Britton, BS, HTL(ASCP)cm, program director at William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Michigan . This weekend is designed to help guide you through the certification process.
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TOP STORIES


Scientists identify DNA alterations as among earliest to occur in lung cancer development
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine via Medical Xpress
Working with tissue, blood and DNA from six people with precancerous and cancerous lung lesions, a team of Johns Hopkins scientists has identified what it believes are among the very earliest "premalignant" genetic changes that mark the potential onset of the most common and deadliest form of disease.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  GBI Cost Effective Products

GBI Labs produces the largest selection of secondary detection kits, from single to multiple detection kits, with wide range host species. We provide FREE samples to 1st time users. Staining with our kits results in similar or better sensitivity than other detection kits on the market with 20%-30% cost less.
 


New biosensing film can diagnose both viral and bacterial infections cheaply and without the need for traditional clinical pathology lab tests
Dark Daily
New technology could shift the paradigm in infectious disease testing by clinical laboratories, while also giving hospitals a faster way to identify hospital-acquired infections and monitor patients for infections post-discharge. The diagnostic technology is built into a special "biosensing film" made of cellulose paper and a flexible polymer.
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New test developed to measure healthy aging
Medical News Today
Researchers have developed a new molecular test designed to calculate an individual's "biological age" as opposed to their "chronological age." They believe the test could lead to improvements in how age-related diseases are managed.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Hassle Free Block Storage Cabinet

Avantik Biogroup is proud to introduce another Customer Requested Quality Innovation for Histology...the Avantik Biogroup Block Storage Cabinet! We introduced Hassle-Free Drawer Technology with Interlocking Stackability and More Clearance between the top of the blocks and the drawers to achieve the industry's first Jam-Free, Hassle-Free Block Storage Cabinet!
 


4-D technology allows self-folding of complex objects
Lab Manager
Using components made from smart shape-memory materials with slightly different responses to heat, researchers have demonstrated a four-dimensional printing technology that allowed creation of complex self-folding structures.
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Orphan drugs: Rare diseases, rare funding
Laboratory Equipment
Here's an unfortunate riddle: What affects as many as 25,000 Americans (as reported by the NIH) but receives only a small slice of the pharmaceutical funding pie? The answer is an orphan disease. Defined by the Orphan Drug Act of 1983 as a condition affecting fewer than 200,000 people nationwide, there are more than 6,000 orphan diseases known today ranging from well-known ALS to little-known NGLY1.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Quality Service. Premium Remanufactured Instruments.

Southeast Pathology Instrument Service is a leader in providing high quality service and sales of remanufactured histology instrumentation. All instruments come completely remanufactured and include a full parts and labor warranty. See why we have the most reliable service and instruments in the industry.
 


IN THE NEWS


Internationally respected experts in clinical pathology and laboratory medicine ask: Why don't we know more about Theranos' technology?
Dark Daily
Several internationally-respected clinical laboratory experts are asking serious questions about Theranos and its diagnostic testing technology, and they've gotten few answers to date. Though the number of experts is small, their credentials in the clinical laboratory profession are impressive. In addition, some have published their critiques of the start-up medical laboratory company in well-respected medical journals.
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Researchers quantify relationship between scientific discoveries and advances in medicine
Gladstone Institutes via Medical Xpress
Scientists from the Gladstone Institutes have provided a detailed map of how basic research translates into new treatments for deadly diseases. Charting the network of discoveries that led to the development of important therapeutic drugs, the investigators revealed that, up to now, the path to a cure has required thousands of scientists and many decades. Writing in the journal Cell, the authors propose that a clearer understanding of how past successes have come about can reveal ways to accelerate the process of finding future cures.
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TrialMatch aims to ease the pain of clinical trials recruitment
Tech Crunch
Clinical trials landed in the tech spotlight earlier this year when Apple launched an iOS software framework to let users sign up for medical trials. The challenge generally for medical researchers remains signing the right people up to studies with very specific criteria for participants. On one level that's a matching problem — which suggests technology can help (Apple certainly thinks so). TrialMatch, a hack demoed onstage recently at the TechCrunch Disrupt SF Hackathon, is also targeting this problem.
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Research 1st to document how confidence in managers can influence audit quality
Lab Manager
Conventional wisdom might lead you to believe that auditors working with high-risk businesses are likely to conduct more skeptical and in-depth investigations. However, Jennifer Joe's research is the first to document the influence that managers of these high-risk companies can have on the depth and quality of audits simply by demonstrating confidence to auditors.
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A closer look at TEXT ME clinical trial reveals 5 ways to improve clinical validation of apps
MedCity News
A study using text messages to improve management of cardiovascular disease published in JAMA recently offered yet another example of how apps can affect behavior change, in this case cardiovascular disease. But an editorial citing the study noted that the process for clinical validation could use some improvement and offered some recommendations.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Study shows intensive blood pressure management may save lives (National Institutes of Health)
New research confirms how to take better workday breaks (Lab Manager)
Study shows protein creates tumor-fighting cells (Medical Xpress)
As ICD-10 deadline approaches, labs wonder if providers, payers will make a smooth transition (Dark Daily)
Mouse brain map may provide new insights into origins of mental illnesses (The Medical News)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642   
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