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NSH NEWS

October – Breast Cancer Awareness Month
NSH
The National Society for Histotechnology wants you to think pink this October. In support of Breast Cancer Awareness, NSH is offering its pink merchandise at discounted prices. Pink lunchboxes only $5.00, pink button up shirts $20.00 (men & women), and pink koozies only $2.00. Click here to view more online and rock your pink this month! Sale is good through October 31, 2014.
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NSH Career Center – your best source for available jobs in the Histology Field
NSH
The NSH Career Center is the site for job seekers and employers looking to land the right job or employee within the histology profession. An extensive database of job postings and candidate resumes are available to view. Visit the Career Center today and post your resume online or access the newest and freshest jobs available. Learn More

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TOP STORIES


Researchers engineer new mouse model to study disease
Health Canal
Researchers from the Broad Institute and MIT have created a new mouse model to simplify application of the CRISPR-Cas9 system for genome-editing experiments in living animals. The researchers successfully used the new "Cas9 mouse" model to edit multiple genes in a variety of cell types, and to model lung adenocarcinoma, one of the most lethal human cancers.
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Graphene-based sensor points to improved retinal implants
Optics.org
Manufacturing some of the key elements involved in artificial retinal implants from graphene could improve the performance and utility of such devices, as well as providing further proof of the versatility of the material in biomedical applications.
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Sleep apnea Tx may cut cardiovascular surgical complication risk in half
Healthday News via MPR
Screening and treating patients for obstructive sleep apnea before they have surgery may reduce their risk of cardiovascular complications by more than half, according to a study published in the October issue of Anesthesiology. The study included more than 4,200 patients who were diagnosed with sleep apnea either before or after they had surgery, and a group of patients without sleep apnea.
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The value of rapid tests
ADVANCE for Medical Laboratory Professionals
On a day-to-day basis, laboratory professionals work with an unprecedented number of samples. Both to improve efficiency and protect patient anonymity, these samples are carefully labeled, numbered and processed - ensuring that each sample is examined in a scientific manner. But what happens when things become personal for the laboratorians? The incredible story of a medical technologist at Valley View Hospital in Glenwood Springs, Colorado, sheds light on a very personal situation and the testing that made all the difference.
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Study: Telomere length impacts melanoma risk
Dermatology Times
Researchers with Dartmouth College have found that genes controlling telomere length of telomeres influence the risk of melanoma. Investigators from Norris Cotton Cancer Center at Dartmouth-Hitchcock, Lebanon, New Hampshire, worked with the international research group Melanoma Genetics Consortium to conduct a study of 11,108 melanoma cases and 13,933 control cases from the United States, Australia, Europe and Israel, according to a news release.
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Scientists improve microscopic batteries with homebuilt imaging analysis
R&D Magazine
In a rare case of having their cake and eating it too, scientists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and other institutions have developed a toolset that allows them to explore the complex interior of tiny, multi-layered batteries they devised. It provides insight into the batteries’ performance without destroying them — resulting in both a useful probe for scientists and a potential power source for micromachines.
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IN THE NEWS


Expanded knowledge about human metabolome expected to fuel development of new therapeutic drugs and medical laboratory tests
Dark Daily
One field of science that bears great potential for use in diagnostics and medical laboratory testing involves the human metabolome. Researchers are gaining more understanding of the genetic underpinnings of complex disease and drug response through metabolic pathways. For example, scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI) in the United Kingdom have linked 145 genetic regions with more than 400 molecules involved in metabolism in human blood, a story in Genetic Engineering News recently reported.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


Newly found estrogen pathway suggests novel breast cancer targets
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
Researchers at the University of Illinois say they have discovered a previously unknown mechanism by which estrogen prepares cells to divide, grow and, in the case of estrogen-positive breast cancers, resist cancer drugs. The scientists point out that the work reveals new targets for breast cancer therapy and will help doctors predict which patients need the most aggressive treatment.
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Biologists find an early sign of pancreatic cancer
Bioscience Technology
This finding, which suggests that muscle tissue is broken down in the disease's earliest stages, could offer new insights into developing early diagnostics for pancreatic cancer, which kills about 40,000 Americans every year and is usually not caught until it is too late to treat. The study, which appears in the journal Nature Medicine, is based on an analysis of blood samples from 1,500 people participating in long-term health studies.
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Tiny tips reveal cells' chemical secrets
Royal Society of Chemistry
U.S. researchers have broken into individual living cells with inexpensive probes that can suck their contents directly into a mass spectrometer (MS). Zhibo Yang and Anthony Burgett from the University of Oklahoma say this will help study cells that are hard to obtain or culture, like stem cells and patient samples. "There is no sample preparation and no delay between sampling and analysis," Yang observes.
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Engineers devise technology for rapidly testing drug-delivery vehicles in zebrafish
Phys.org
MIT engineers have devised a way to rapidly test hundreds of different drug-delivery vehicles in living animals, making it easier to discover promising new ways to deliver a class of drugs called biologics, which includes antibodies, peptides, RNA, and DNA, to human patients. In a study appearing in the journal Integrative Biology, the researchers used this technology to identify materials that can efficiently deliver RNA to zebrafish and also to rodents.
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Scripps Research Institute scientists shed light on cause of spastic paraplegia
Science Codex
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered that a gene mutation linked to hereditary spastic paraplegia, a disabling neurological disorder, interferes with the normal breakdown of triglyceride fat molecules in the brain. The TSRI researchers found large droplets of triglycerides within the neurons of mice modeling the disease.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Why medical clinical trials are so wrong so often (The Washington Post)
More workplace tension in hospitals, clinics as 3 generations of physicians try to get along (Dark Daily)
Finding risks, not answers in gene tests (The New York Times)
Heather Dugmore: Are superbugs like Ebola winning the war? (BizNews.com)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642   
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