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NSH NEWS

#GivingTuesday — NSH ADA Fund donations
NSH
Black Friday, Cyber Monday and yesterday was Giving Tuesday. In that spirit the National Society for Histotechnology received donations towards its Americans with Disabilities Fund. The NSH ADA Fund is used to provide accommodations by request to attendees at NSH events or using NSH resource materials. Thank you to those who contributed, your donation goes a long way to help those who have not had the chance to experience everything NSH has to offer. For more information or to donate, click here.
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NSH webinar: Relationships Between ISO, CLIA, and CLSI for Histotechnology
NSH
A quality management system is an organized way to manage the interrelationships in any type of laboratory's management and technical procedures, including histotechnology. U.S. laboratories have long followed the CLIA regulation, as well as the standards and requirements of several laboratory accreditation organizations. Relatively new on the scene is the international medical laboratory standard ISO 15189, recently updated in 2012. On Wednesday, Dec. 10, Lucia Berte, MA,MT(ASCP) will explore the relationships between ISO 15189 and U.S. laboratory accreditation requirements and how a model can be used to apply all the requirements to any histology laboratory. Register today!
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Breast cancer vaccine shows promise in slowing progress
TIME
An initial safety trial of a breast cancer vaccine has proven safe, with preliminary results suggesting the vaccine will slow cancer progression. The vaccine, which is being developed by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is meant for patients with breast cancers that express a protein found only in breast tissue called mammaglobin-A.
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Should the FDA force drug makers to discuss their clinical trials?
Forbes
When developing a new drug, biopharmaceutical companies design clinical trials which, if successful, will garner approval from the FDA and other regulatory agencies around the world. Late stage clinical trials are time consuming and costly, with expenses running into tens, even hundreds, of millions of dollars. Oftentimes, you get only one chance to run such a program and so it's important to get the design right. Thus, it behooves companies to meet with the FDA to discuss their protocols to get a sense of whether the FDA will approve the drug pending a successful outcome with regard to safety and efficacy.
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New insights into genetic mechanisms common to humans and simpler species may form the basis for new diagnostic tests performed by clinical pathology labs
Dark Daily
New discoveries about the interaction of genes and transcription factors in creating different types of RNA will be of interest to pathologists and clinical chemists performing genetic tests and molecular diagnostic assays in their medical laboratories. The goal of this research is to better understand hereditary genetic disease in humans. The new knowledge is based on studies of the common fruit fly, or Drosophila melanogaster, and to a lesser extent a tiny worm Caenorhabditis elegans. Both have been used as research models to study the human condition.
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Turning skin cells into brain cells: A Huntington's disease research breakthrough?
HDBuzz
Scientists can now reprogram human skin cells to make working cells that resemble "medium spiny neurons," the type of brain cell that is most affected early in Huntington's disease. We're still a long way off from being able to replace the brain cells that are being lost in HD, but this research is an important step down that path, and is a great tool to study HD.
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Researchers recreate stem cells from deceased patients to study present-day illnesses
Medical Xpress
Research scientists have developed a novel method to re-create brain and intestinal stem cells from patients who died decades ago, using DNA from stored blood samples to study the potential causes of debilitating illnesses such as inflammatory bowel disease. The lab research, published in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine, could yield new therapies for people who suffer from aggressive motor-neuron and gut-related conditions that proved fatal to the deceased patients who long-ago volunteered their blood samples.
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IN THE NEWS


Scientists discover why bowel cancer sometimes outsmarts treatment
Cancer Research UK
A new study that challenges the prevailing view of how bowel cancer develops in the large intestine is published in Nature Medicine. Cancer Research UK scientists have discovered that bowel cancer may not be restricted to starting its journey in the stem cells in the lining of the intestines as previously thought. The researchers, based at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, studied a hereditary faulty gene which can cause bowel cancer in middle age. The faulty gene causes normal cells to behave like immortal stem cells and develop tumors of their own — challenging the theory that normal cells have a fixed fate and limited lifespan.
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Tim Duncan donates $247,000 to cancer research project
USA Today
San Antonio Spurs forward Tim Duncan has made more than 200 million dollars in salary over the course of his 17-year NBA career, and he's using some of that money to give back to the community and support a local cancer research project. Duncan donated $247,000 to the San Antonio 1000 Cancer Genome Project.
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Researchers identify new components of viral infection
BioScholar
In order to infect a host cell and proliferate, some viruses, such as the hepatitis C virus, infiltrate the ribosomes, the molecular machines that assemble the proteins present in each of our cells. Viral proteins are thus produced to the detriment of cellular proteins. A group of scientists in Strasbourg has demonstrated that one of the 80 components of each ribosome is essential for infection by certain viruses without being necessary for normal cell functioning.
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Scientists discover malaria's Achilles heel — clinical trials promising
The Sydney Morning Herald
Scientists have discovered an Achilles heel for the malaria parasite, in a breakthrough that could lead to new ways of killing the parasite which claims the lives of more than half a million people every year. Scientists from the Australian National University, working with research groups across Australia and the globe have uncovered a raft of molecules capable of disabling a molecular salt pump on the surface of the malaria parasite.
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At the University of Michigan, research study indicates how composition of gut microbiome may serve as complementary, noninvasive screening tool for colon cancer
Dark Daily
Microbiologists may play a greater role in the early detection of colorectal cancer, if the findings of a research study at the University of Michigan are confirmed with additional clinical studies. Combining gut microbiome analysis with traditional risk factors for colorectal cancer — such as body mass index, age and race — significantly improved the ability of pathologists to distinguish healthy people from those with precancerous or cancerous lesions, wrote researchers from the UMich in a scholarly paper published in the November 2014 issue in Cancer Prevention Research.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Whistleblower lawsuits at US clinical pathology laboratories are rising (Dark Daily)
Happy Thanksgiving from NSH (NSH)
Vitamin B3 actually cures a liver cancer in mice (Cherry Creek News)
Nail stem cells are highly versatile (Laboratory Equipment)
New insight can help determine when mouse models are good stand-ins for studying humans (Medical Xpress)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642   
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