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TOP STORIES


1 protein, 2 personalities: Study identifies new mechanism of cancer spread
University of Pennsylvania via Medical Xpress
Cancer involves a breakdown of normal cell behavior. Cell reproduction and movement go haywire, causing tumors to grow and spread through the body. A new finding by University of Pennsylvania scientists has identified key steps that trigger this disintegration of cellular regulation. Their discovery — that a protein called Exo70 has a split personality, with one form keeping cells under tight control and another contributing to the ability of tumors to invade distant parts of the body — points to new possibilities for diagnosing cancer spread.
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SPONSORED CONTENT


New approach may cures wide range of diseases
Fars News Agency
A team led by a longtime Oregon Health & Science University researcher has demonstrated in mice what could be a revolutionary new technique to cure a wide range of human diseases — from cystic fibrosis to cataracts to Alzheimer's disease — that are caused by "misfolded" protein molecules.
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Researchers discover biological mechanism that allows brain tumor cells
to escape from drugs

The Medical News
Researchers from UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have discovered a biological mechanism that allows brain tumor cells to escape from the drugs designed to target them, resulting in drug resistance. The study was published in the recent online issue of Science. Glioblastoma is the most common and deadliest form of brain cancer. Drugs have been designed to find and kill glioblastoma cells by targeting telltale mutations on the cell surface that accelerate tumor growth.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Stellaris RNA FISH Probes

Stellaris RNA FISH is a new research technology that enables direct detection, localization and quantification of RNA. The low cost per assay, simple protocol, and the ability to localize mRNA and lncRNA to organelles and cellular structures provides obvious benefits for life science research. Custom and catalogued probes sets available. MORE
 


New blood test may aid in early detection of breast cancer
Oncology Nurse Advisor
A new blood test for peptides cleaved by carboxypeptidase N may soon be available to help detect early stages of breast cancer. Carboxypeptidase N, an enzyme that modifies proteins to produce smaller peptides, is elevated in lung cancer. A new study in Clinical Chemistry showed that enzyme levels are also increased in breast cancer patients. Further, peptide levels in the blood accurately predicted the presence of early-stage breast cancer tissue in mice as well as a small population of human patients.
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IN THE NEWS


Researcher reveals protein once thought to be expressed only in brain may cause certain thyroid cancers
Bio News Texas
Researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center have discovered that a protein once thought to be expressed in the brain only may play an important role in a deadly form of thyroid cancer and other cancers. This result may provide researchers with a new target to stop the progression of these cancers. Researchers found that over-activation of a certain protein in hormone-secreting cells helps fuel medullary thyroid cancer cells in mice as well as human cells. The over-active protein makes a potential target for inhibiting cancer cell growth.
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  PRODUCT SHOWCASES
ergoCentric Laboratory Seating

Visit LabStorage System’s updated website to view details about this new laboratory seating with specially formulated Infection Control coating. Non-porous and easily disinfected, this moisture proof coating is anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and stain resistant. more
Spring Bioscience - BRAF V600E


Spring Bioscience is leading the research industry by pioneering novel, next generation antibodies that can differentiate mutant and normal protein, enabling pathologists to see relevant mutations within their cellular context. Having already released Exon19 and EGFR L858R for exclusive use by Ventana Medical Systems, Spring Bioscience has launched BRAF V600E.
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Half-match donor promising in acute leukemia
MedPage Today
A new strategy for hematopoietic stem cell transplants may offer hope to almost all children with acute leukemia, a researcher said here. The approach uses a so-called half-matched donor — usually either a child's mother or father — and offers efficacy comparable with transplant from fully matched donors, according to Alice Bertaina, M.D., of Bambino Gesu Children's Hospital in Rome.
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The role of nanomaterials in the treatment of cerebral palsy
By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani
Although there are different causes for the development of cerebral palsy, neuroinflammation plays a major role in brain injury. At present, there is no effective cure for this disorder. Therefore, a therapeutic approach that targets the brain with minimum side effects, crosses the blood-brain barrier and affects only cells involved in injury would be beneficial. Recently, nanoparticle-based therapeutic approaches have been studied for prevention and treatment of brain injury. Nanomaterials, such as dendrimers, have the benefit of a targeted delivery for multiple drugs, which can interact with several pathways involved in injury.
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Killing cancer like the common cold
CNN
Nick Wilkins was diagnosed with leukemia when he was four years old, and when the cancer kept bouncing back, impervious to all the different treatments the doctors tried, his father sat him down for a talk. John Wilkins explained to Nick, who was by then 14, that doctors had tried chemotherapy, radiation, even a bone marrow transplant from his sister. "I explained to him that we're running out of options," Wilkins remembers telling his son. There was one possible treatment they could try: an experimental therapy at the University of Pennsylvania.
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Proximity ligation assays: Advancing the study of proteins
By Dr. Afsaneh Motamed-Khorasani
Proximity ligation assay, or PLA, is a novel method for the detection of proteins, post-translational modification of proteins and protein-protein interactions. This method will play a key role in future diagnostics and makes it possible to study the presence of the less abundant proteins, and thus it will be easier to identify relevant diseases. Multiplex assays could be designed in which many proteins in the same sample are detected using PLA.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword PROTEINS.


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Why do tumors become resistant to chemotherapy? (Science Codex)
Toronto researchers: Recurring colon cancer deactivated using drug that 'wiped out the ability of cells to make new tumors' (National Post)
New biomarkers improve prostate cancer diagnostics (Medical Xpress)
New family of proteins linked to major role in cancer (Medical Xpress)
Aging cells share features with cancer (Ars Technica)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 

Under the Microscope
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