This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.



Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit |  Histology Marketplace:     

Home   History   Meeting Calendar   Career Center   Certification   Contact Us    



 




Happy New Year from NSH! As a continuation of last week's top 10 most accessed articles in 2014, here's the next 10 for your reading pleasure. Our regular publication will resume Jan. 7.



TOP STORIES

Why medical clinical trials are so wrong so often
The Washington Post
From Sept. 25: "Studies show" doesn't mean what it used to. According to a report published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, scientific studies aren't as definitive as you might think. A team of researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine found that two scientists looking at the same clinical trial data (the information that determines what drugs get approved and recommended) may have contradictory interpretations of the results 35 percent of the time.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  




Whistleblower lawsuits at US clinical pathology labs are rising
Dark Daily
From Nov. 26: Whistleblower activity across the medical laboratory industry seems to be increasing. This can be both a positive and a negative trend for pathologists and clinical laboratory managers. On the positive side, a whistleblower lawsuit that is joined by the U.S. Department of Justice and state attorney generals is one way to curb the illegal marketing and business practices of those medical lab companies willing to gain a competitive market advantage by pushing their interpretation of federal and state laws beyond legal limits.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Tiny motors that fit inside human cells could someday treat disease
Gigaom
From Feb. 26: Tiny synthetic motors created at Pennsylvania State University are the first to fit inside living human cells, where they can modify the cell's structure or even kill it. The advancement opens up new possibilities for researchers to develop disease treatments.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


SPONSORED CONTENT


Lucrative biopsies spur fight by pathologists
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
From May 14: For most people, a biopsy is a fast and simple procedure — a sliver or patch of skin or a few drops of fluid are extracted in a doctor's office and sent to a laboratory for examination. It's also potentially lifesaving. Biopsies such as Pap smears and the analysis of polyps, tumors and skin anomalies are crucial in detecting certain cancers. But how much a biopsy costs and who pays for it can be complex.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Miss an issue of Under The Microscope? Click here to visit the Under The Microscope archive page.


Labs are told to start including a neglected variable: Females
The New York Times
From May 22: For decades, scientists have embarked on the long journey toward a medical breakthrough by first experimenting on laboratory animals. Mice or rats, pigs or dogs, they were usually male: Researchers avoided using female animals for fear that their reproductive cycles and hormone fluctuations would confound the results of delicately calibrated experiments.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  GBI Cost Effective Products

GBI Labs produces the largest selection of secondary detection kits, from single to multiple detection kits, with wide range host species. We provide FREE samples to 1st time users. Staining with our kits results in similar or better sensitivity than other detection kits on the market with 20%-30% cost less.
 


US hospitals up Ebola precautions
Laboratory Equipment
From Oct. 8: Public hospitals in New York City are concerned enough about Ebola that they've secretly been sending actors with mock symptoms into emergency rooms to test how good the triage staff is at identifying and isolating possible cases. A small hospital in the Ohio countryside has hung up signs, imploring patients to let nurses know immediately if they have traveled recently to West Africa.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Drug resistance spreads worldwide, raises future concerns
Laboratory Equipment
From April 30: Bacteria resistant to antibiotics have now spread to every part of the world and might lead to a future where minor infections could kill, according to a report published recently by the World Health Organization. In its first global survey of the resistance problem, WHO says it found very high rates of drug-resistant E. coli bacteria, which causes problems including meningitis and infections of the skin, blood and the kidneys. The agency notes there are many countries where treatment for the bug is useless in more than half of patients.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE




More workplace tension in hospitals, clinics as 3 generations of physicians try to get along
Dark Daily
From Sept. 25: What happens when Gen Y, Gen X, and baby boomer physicians are employees in the same hospital, clinic or medical laboratory? There can be a clash of expectations, values and goals that may cause tension in the workplace. This happens when physicians, including pathologists, from different generations and different levels of experience levels come together as employees of hospitals and large medical groups, noted a recent story published by Modern Healthcare.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Why does great collaboration require good conflict?
Lab Manager
From June 18: Lynda McDermott writes: "In my work with teams over the past 25 years all around the world, I have never found a high-performing team that did not have moments when team members disagreed, debated or argued. These teams all had a healthy respect for the value of not only having differences of opinions or perspectives but also for having learned how to manage themselves as they worked through the discord or tensions precipitated by their disputes. Rather than being an enemy of collaboration, conflict is, in fact, a necessary requirement for productive and successful collaboration."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Might pathologists soon have a medical laboratory test capable of predicting a patient's probability of death within 5 years?
Dark Daily
From May 22: Will there be demand for a medical laboratory test that can help pathologists accurately predict the probability of death within five years for an individual? New research emerging from Europe suggests that such a diagnostic assay may be feasible. More remarkable, this clinical laboratory test may be as simple as testing for the concentration of four biomarkers in blood. In combination, these biomarkers indicate the status of metabolism in all humans that can possibly predict when an individual will die.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


 

Under the Microscope
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642   
Contribute news

This edition of Under the Microscope was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
Dec. 23, 2014
Dec. 17, 2014
Dec 15, 2014 Blast
Dec 11, 2014 Blast



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063