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Taxidermy a passion and hobby for Hepworth man
Qwen Sound Sun Times
For Chris Phair his passion for the art form of taxidermy paid off as he came away with a treasure trove of awards at the Canadian Taxidermist Association Convention and Competition held from April 4-6 in London. Phair is new to taxidermy with just three years under his belt, but said he has learned so much from his fellow taxidermists and at the conventions in that short time. Phair owns and operates his taxidermy business called Tines and Tail feathers out of his home in Hepworth and is currently the vice-president of the CTA.
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The art of taxidermy
Zanesville Times Recorder
Written by Don Pagat: "The other day I stopped by Greg Clossman's taxidermy shop to see how his deer season business went. Clossman said it was way down, but he still had about 20 nice bucks he mounted. He had a grin on his face and asked me to have a look in his other room."
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SCI sues to challenge African elephant importation ban
SCI
Safari Club International filed a lawsuit to challenge the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's abrupt and unwarranted bans on the importation of sport-hunted African elephants from Zimbabwe and Tanzania. The FWS issued the importation ban on April 4 without consultation of the nations affected or the hunters impacted.
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Tips for spring squirrel hunting
Outdoor Life
Just because winter is over and turkey season takes spring's center stage doesn't mean small-game hunters are through for the year. At least nine states offer spring squirrel-hunting seasons in May and June, presenting hunters with solid opportunities to get in the woods before summer hits full bore. Seasons exist in Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, Tennessee, eastern Texas, Virginia and Kansas. Some are long, such as in Arkansas, where it runs from mid-May through the end of February. Others are short, like in Virginia, where it's just a couple of weeks in June.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Kansas taxidermist finding his niche (The Topeka Capital-Journal)
Gyotaku: The most ancient form of taxidermy (Field & Stream)
Ohio Taxidermy Championships and Wildlife Display (Xenia Gazette)
New world-record bighorn ram picked up in Alberta (Outdoor Life)
Hunters: US ban on elephant trophy imports from Tanzania and Zimbabwe will backfire (WSF)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Wyoming to take public comment on wolf hunts
KLIX-AM
The Wyoming Game and Fish Department will hold public meetings next month in Jackson to hear comment on proposed 2014 gray wolf hunting seasons, changes to license issuance and hunter safety regulations. The proposed 2014 gray wolf hunt area mortality quotas will be available on the Game and Fish website May 1. Wolf hunting season dates are proposed to be similar to 2013 hunting seasons.
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Kansas hunter education instructors recognized for dedication
Ammo Land
Tim Boxberger, 2014 Instructor of the Year, has been a volunteer instructor for 20-plus years — they spend countless hours teaching their students basic firearm safety, the importance of conserving and managing our state's natural resources, and what it means to be an ethical hunter. Kansas Hunter Education Program volunteer instructors attempt to teach young and new hunters everything they should learn before hitting the field. They don't do it for the money — they aren't paid. They don't do it because they have to — no one is making them. They do it because it's what they love.
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How to hunt high-country turkeys
Outdoor Life
Andrew McKean, a blogger for Outdoor Life, writes: "When he ran into my setup, the New Mexican gobbler's chest seemed unnaturally huge. I assumed it was because he was so puffed up, ready to kick the grits out of the full-strut Hazel Creek tom decoy. But later, when I checked my GPS and confirmed the elevation — 10,400 feet above sea level — it occurred to me that maybe the tom's breast was so large because his lungs were freakishly big, an adaptation to living in that thin alpine air.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword Taxidermy.


FEATURED ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
SCI sues to challenge African elephant importation ban
SCI
Safari Club International filed a lawsuit to challenge the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s abrupt and unwarranted bans on the importation of sport-hunted African elephants from Zimbabwe and Tanzania.

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Kansas taxidermist finding his niche
The Topeka Capital-Journal
A monster buck resting peacefully in a meadow. A plump tom gobbling thunderously from its roost. A playful otter frolicking in a creek.

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Gyotaku: The most ancient form of taxidermy
Field & Stream
The image you see here is a sockeye salmon "fish rubbing" done by my friend Scott Wells. The process is called Gyotaku, pronounced ghe-yo-tah-koo.

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Comparing different types of turkey calls
By John McAdams
Since spring turkey season overlaps with mating season for turkeys in most of the United States, imitating turkey vocalizations is the most popular and most effective technique used by turkey hunters to call in a big gobbler. There are a wide variety of turkey calls available on the market today, and I hope to provide some useful information on the advantages and disadvantages of each in this article.
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Firearm suppressor sales soar, backlog of registrations climb
KETK-TV
In 2012 Texas lawmakers voted to legalize the use of silencers for hunting all game. Joe Terry, an avid hunter said, "We have a feral hog problem here and if you're using a suppressor, they kind of don't know where you're at, they can't hear you. So you can actually shoot several instead of one and then the whole heard running off." Forty other U.S. states now also have laws allowing suppressors while hunting. According to the National Rifle Association, that's half a million registrations in the last year; compared to 360,000 in 2012 and 285,000 in 2011.
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NTA Cutting Edge
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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