This message contains images. If you don't see images, click here to view.
Advertise in this news brief.




  Text Version   RSS   Subscribe   Unsubscribe   Archive   Media Kit May 28, 2014

Home   History   Forum   Outlook Magazine    Bios    Members Websites   Become a Member


 

Taxidermist wires dead loons for research
The Mining Journal
The taxidermist called it the strangest request he'd ever had. He'd been brought a dead loon. Nothing too odd about that. But wildlife biologist Kevin Kenow asked the bird be mounted to look, well, flopped over dead. What Kenow then did with the loon might seem, at first glance, even stranger: He stuck a radio transmitter in it. Avian botulism had been killing loons and other waterfowl by the thousands on the Great Lakes. Most assumed birds that succumbed to the toxin would wash up not far from where they died, but Kenow and other researchers wanted to be sure.
   Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE  


Original tough guy: Famed taxidermist turns 150
Democrat & Chronicle
Carl Akeley did not fluster easily. For example: The time he killed a leopard with his bare hands. It was in Somalia, 1896, and the Clarendon, Orleans County, native had just bagged a warthog for his employer, the Field Museum in Chicago. He heard a rustling behind him, spun around and fired, thinking it was a hyena. Actually, it was a leopard, and he missed. The cat lunged and clamped down on his right arm. He used his left hand to choke it, then jumped on it with his knees, breaking its ribs and puncturing its lungs.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Taxidermy teacher says stuffing dead creatures is about love, not morbidity (DNAinfo Chicago)
5 mature buck myths dashed (American Hunter)
Outdoor Life reviews and ranks the best new rifles (Outdoor Life)
Whether you are on the water or in the woods, if fish or game is involved, so is scouting (SurfKy.com)
African wildlife conservationists, lobbies US over jumbo imports (News Day)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Is coyote bounty helping mule deer? Wildlife officials say it will over time
Deseret News
Mark Worden, the owner of Utah Predator Callers, has been hunting since the age of 10. While in Box Elder County last October, he killed two coyotes in just 14 minutes. It could have been a $100 experience if he had chosen to cash in with Utah's coyote bounty program.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Allis Markham, Hollywood Taxidermy's rising star
Bloomberg Businessweek
Allis Markham has two dead cats in her freezer. There's also a frozen peacock, an Arctic fox pup, four raccoons, four grapefruit-size bull scrotums and several fluffy ducklings sealed in a Ziploc bag. "I'm looking to get a camel and an ostrich," Markham says during an April visit to her studio in downtown Los Angeles. "I've been calling ostrich farms, petting zoos, camel ride places." She adds, "It's hard not to creep people out."
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


New Mexico game agency considers deer hunting reduction
Silver City News
The state Game and Fish Department is seeking public comment on possible changes in hunting rules, including a proposal to reduce the number of licenses for hunting deer. Meetings are scheduled in Roswell at the agency's office and at the department's headquarters outside of Santa Fe. Both meetings start at 6 p.m. The agency is encouraging sportsmen to offer their views on possible rules changes for deer, elk, bighorn sheep, pronghorn antelope as well as turkey and migratory game birds for hunting seasons from 2015 through 2019.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Keeping safe in the woods, water
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
There's no such thing as a bad time to be an outdoorsman. Those adventures, big and small, are wonderful. Provided you live to tell about them. Fortunately, your chances of going to the woods or water and coming back out alive are better today than when granddad was totting his paddle or shotgun.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE
Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword Taxidermy.


FEATURED ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
Turkey hunting technique tests ethics, risks safety
The Spokesman-Review
An old technique of hiding behind a gobbler decoy to stalk wild turkeys is being revived — much to the dismay of hunter safety educators.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
Taxidermy teacher says stuffing dead creatures is about love, not morbidity
DNAinfo Chicago
Mickey Alice Kwapis' job is the stuff of dreams. One week after graduating from college, the 23-year-old taxidermy instructor launched a full-time career traveling the world teaching her passion to others.

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more
5 mature buck myths dashed
American Hunter
By Frank Miniter: "When I ask deer researchers what GPS-collar studies are telling them about mature-buck movement the first thing they all tell me is 'mature bucks are individuals."

Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
read more


Diverse wildlife a huge draw to visitors near Cody
Sioux City Journal
Hundreds of thousands of visitors come each year to Cody, Wyoming, equipped with cameras and binoculars, hoping to see an elk, moose, pronghorn antelope, bighorn sheep, mountain goat, whitetail deer or mule deer. Kevin Hurley remembers seeing them all. In a single day. "It was in April of 1986, and one of those watershed moments I'll always remember," said Hurley, conservation director for the Wild Sheep Foundation in Cody, where there are more bighorn sheep than anywhere else in the state.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


Turkey hunting technique tests ethics, risks safety
The Spokesman-Review
An old technique of hiding behind a gobbler decoy to stalk wild turkeys is being revived — much to the dismay of hunter safety educators. Native Americans, for example, camouflaged themselves with the horns and skins of buffalo to stalk bison. The tactic's effectiveness was all that was important for Indians hunting to survive. But sportsmen have more to consider.
Share this article:   Share on FacebookTwitterShare on LinkedinE-mail article
READ MORE


 

NTA Cutting Edge
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
Download media kit

Brent Mangum, Content Editor, 469.420.2602   
Contribute news

This edition of the NTA Cutting Edge was sent to ##Email##. To unsubscribe, click here. Did someone forward this edition to you? Subscribe here -- it's free!
Recent issues
May 21, 2014
May 14, 2014
May 7, 2014
April 30, 2014



7701 Las Colinas Ridge, Ste. 800, Irving, TX 75063