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This is where confiscated wildlife items go to die another death
The Huffington Post
VideoBriefDon't be fooled by the building's unremarkable exterior; inside this staid warehouse northeast of Denver resides one of the world's largest concentrations of items from the illegal wildlife trade. The 22,000-square-foot warehouse, officially called the "National Wildlife Property Repository," belongs to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and contains upward of a million items, ranging from ivory and furs to stuffed tiger fetuses. In a video, The Atlantic offered a revealing look inside the repository, in addition to the National Eagle Repository next door.
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African safari hunting: Blue wildebeest
By John McAdams
It has been quite a while since I've done an African animal profile. However, it's now the peak of the hunting season in most countries in Africa. In honor of this, I'll continue to post further profiles of African animals over the next few weeks. Perhaps these reports will inspire some readers to pursue dreams of hunting in Africa. Today, I'm writing about the bread and butter of almost any African plains game safari: the blue wildebeest.
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Taxidermist creates fascinators and accessories using dead stuffed animals
Metro
Forget your classic Debenhams fascinator in a nice shade of nude for that upcoming wedding. One designer has created these unusual head pieces featuring taxidermy.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword TAXIDERMY.


Northwest wildlife refuges to phase out pesticide class
Yakima Herald
Federal wildlife refuges in the Northwest and Hawaii will phase out a class of pesticides that are chemically similar to nicotine because they pose a threat to bees and other pollinators key to crop growth.
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This is where confiscated wildlife items go to die another death
The Huffington Post
VideoBriefDon't be fooled by the building's unremarkable exterior; inside this staid warehouse northeast of Denver resides one of the world's largest concentrations of items from the illegal wildlife trade. The 22,000-square-foot warehouse, officially called the "National Wildlife Property Repository," belongs to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and contains upward of a million items, ranging from ivory and furs to stuffed tiger fetuses. In a video, The Atlantic offered a revealing look inside the repository, in addition to the National Eagle Repository next door.

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Exotic wildlife ranch caught with illegal taxidermy in stolen ATV probe
Tulsa World
An investigation into a Hughes County exotic wildlife ranch for stolen all-terrain vehicles allegedly turned up a zoo of state and federal violations, including illegal taxidermy and controlled narcotics. The Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry in a news release stated that Triple S Wildlife Ranch and Resort in Calvin may face a number of state and federal charges after investigators combed the 3,000-acre property, uncovering several stolen ATVs, two stolen tractors, controlled narcotics and mounted animals illegal to have or sell in the state.

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Lessons learned in turkey hunting
By John McAdams
As promised in my previous article about my first turkey hunt, I'm discussing some of the lessons I learned while turkey hunting. I had a great time, and I got a nice turkey to show for it. However, the hunt was not perfect and there are always things that I can improve for the next trip. It always pays to sit down after each hunt and determine what you did well, and what you can do better for the future. With any luck, I'll get another chance to put some of these turkey hunting lessons learned to use next year.

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New policy proposed to benefit at-risk wildlife, provide credits to landowners
AmmoLand
As part of an on-going effort to provide more flexibility under the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently proposed a new policy that would give landowners credit for voluntary conservation actions for at-risk species. Under the proposed policy, landowners could obtain credits for current efforts that benefit declining species.
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Wildlife managers think like a wolf to trap one
Capital Press
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife biologists track, trap and monitor wolves, the better to get a handle on populations and movement throughout the state. Documentation of wolf sightings will open the door to more management options, says wolf specialist Scott Becker.
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Elk hunting tips: The basics of long-range scouting
Outdoor Life
Next to deer, the big-game animal most whitetail hunters want to pursue is bull elk. They are big and dramatic, and so is the country they call home. Millions of acres of elk habitat are open to the public and offer free camping and hunting, no guides required. You can make your own elk-hunting adventure, but first you have to find the elk.
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Getting started in shotshell reloading
Field and Stream
Why reload? You can save a little money and make loads you can’t buy at the store. Reloading is also kind of fun. Working up a load you like is interesting. After you get everything set up and go into production, cranking out shells is good, mindless relaxation.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Exotic wildlife ranch caught with illegal taxidermy in stolen ATV probe (Tulsa World)
Obscure bird could affect control of US Senate (The Associated Press via WRAL-TV)
Judy Onofrio's cow-bone sculptures confront life and death (The Kansas City Star)
Taxidermy an art form for Cavaretta, Louisiana (The Daily Star)
The fine art of stuffing stiffs (The Irish Times)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

NTA Cutting Edge
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642   
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