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Behind the taxidermy renaissance, roadkill and a little imagination
NPR
They say in fashion that everything old can be new again. And of course in the movies, there's no such thing as an original idea anymore. Well, apparently this lack of imagination now applies to a new, old hobby that's making a comeback — taxidermy.
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Making art with animals
The Daily Iberian
There's more than one way to skin a cat... or a deer, or an alligator for that matter, said Jake Degeyter, the young owner of Atchafalaya Taxidermy, who won first place in the National Taxidermy Association Competition in July for his work. The deer shoulder mount that won first in the whitetail deer category in state a few months ago, pulled down another first place at the national competition last month and missed best in show by only one point.
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Record gator taxidermist talks about the big catch
WCNF-TV
VideoBriefA huge 15-foot gator was caught in the Alabama River in Wilcox County recently. Now the taxidermist who is about to perform the taxidermy is speaking out about it.
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Despite progress, long fight ahead to protect rare wildlife from pesticides
The Huffington Post
It's hardly news that many of the more than 18,000 pesticide products approved for use in this country have been linked to cancer and other severe health effects in humans. Indeed, more than 1 billion pounds of pesticides are dumped on the North American landscape every year. Some chemicals, known as endocrine disruptors, interfere with the natural hormones in our bodies that regulate reproduction, brain function and immune response, and may be linked to increased risk for developmental and reproductive problems in both humans and wildlife.
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Wildlife groups argue over bison quarantine proposal
Bozeman Daily Chronicle
Wildlife advocates ended up on opposite sides in a debate over a Yellowstone National Park proposal to reinitiate a quarantine program for park bison. Recently, Yellowstone National Park hosted a public meeting in Bozeman to scope out options and details to include in an environmental assessment on restarting a quarantine program for Yellowstone bison.
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Camouflage: What matters in the big-buck industry?
By Jed Pritchard
So many choices. Real this and mossy that. Timber spooks and prairie switches, to name a few. It's big business. Over the years camouflage has evolved from granddad's plaid shirt to a gazillion-dollar industry powered by marketing professionals in pursuit of the almighty dollar. Truth is, choosing your camouflage from professionally-staged photographs in glossy magazines can be a big mistake. If you work hard for your money and don't intend on dropping a 10-pound sack of $20 bills for new camouflage every fall, you may want to read on.
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Another green energy source criticized for its 'alarming' impact on wildlife
The Associated Press via The Blaze
Workers at a state-of-the-art solar plant in the Mojave Desert have a name for birds that fly through the plant's concentrated sun rays — "streamers," for the smoke plume that comes from birds that ignite in midair. Federal wildlife investigators who visited the BrightSource Energy plant last year and watched as birds burned and fell, reporting an average of one "streamer" every two minutes, are urging California officials to halt the operator's application to build a still-bigger version.
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How to properly sight in a rifle with a scope
By John McAdams
Although it's still summer, hunting season is just around the corner for some parts of the United States. In fact, fall bear season has already started here in Washington. It is important that hunters properly prepare their equipment for the upcoming season. Today, I hope to provide some assistance in this matter by explaining how to sight in a rifle. Since most hunters use telescopic sights on their rifles, this article describes how to sight in a rifle with a scope.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Taxidermy: The new hipster hobby? (OZY)
A tribute to birds and their impact on humanity (Motherboard)
Florida may allow hunters to use silencers (Sun Sentinel)
Outdoorsmen develop hunting app (KNOE-TV)
Whitetail tips: How to map your hunting area (Outdoor Life)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

NTA Cutting Edge
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642   
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