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Placing your feet and picking your ammo for dove hunting
Outdoor Hub
Footwork is an important key to accurate shooting. Often a hunter will be sitting on a dove stool and has to move his body to compensate for the angle that the dove is coming at him. This means he will run out of swing, pull his head up off the gun, and the gun will stop. Instead, you want to have as much room as possible to swing your gun left or right, depending on the flight of the dove, in order to lead the bird properly. If you are sitting on a stool, you need to read the direction the dove is traveling as it flies. As long as you stay still and don’t move, most of the time the dove will continue flying on the same path in the same direction. If you wait until the bird is in range before you move, you shouldn’t affect his flight path.
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Where's the ammo?
American Rifleman
The NRA is regularly inundated with letters from members requesting an explanation of the nationwide ammo shortage. Some folks merely vent their frustration over the amount of ammo they are able to acquire for range sessions. Some complain about the jump in prices; they insist it can't all be explained by supply and demand. Others are sure the government is buying up all the ammo so average Americans can't get their hands on it. Everyone wants to know if we have any inside information.
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Rare shot of mountain lion guarding deer kill
OutdoorHub
The photo was taken in California by biologist Irv Nilsen, who then sent it in to the office at the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area. The image is rare depiction of a mountain lion claiming a dead deer, although it is not known if the deer had been killed by the cougar or met an untimely end in traffic. According to park rangers, Nilsen found the two on a remote stretch of the Mulholland Highway. The cat has been identified as P-23, a young female that recently left her mother. If you look closely you can see the collar around her neck.
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Parks limiting access to protect struggling caribou
Rocky Mountain Outlook
Some backcountry areas of Jasper National Park will be off limits to people for a portion of each winter in a bid to save declining populations of caribou. Parks Canada has announced there will be “delayed winter access” to important habitat in three areas of Jasper National Park to reduce the likelihood of packed trails helping wolves hunt threatened caribou. At the same time, to appease backcountry enthusiasts, the federal agency said it would open up new trails for cross-country skiing and snowshoeing.
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Waterfowl: 8 birds to bag before you die
Outdoor Life
A big flock of Canada geese dropping into the decoys will make any waterfowl hunter's heart skip a beat. Wood ducks might be the most beautiful creatures in North America. A lone late-season greenhead circling your spread is enough to get you out of bed early on a cold winter morning. But these birds aren't on anybody's bucket list. For hardcore waterfowlers with big aspirations, we selected 8 birds to hunt before you kick the aforementioned bucket. Start booking your airline flights now.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    The meat-eating habits of deer (Outdoor Hub)
The dangers of deer cloning (Outdoor Life)
Kentucky hunting area to close for National Guard training (The Gleaner)
Hunting prospects vary in Wyoming this fall (The Sacramento Bee)
CSC student hunts in Africa prior to cracking the books (Rapid City Journal)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Sheep study shows rams with big horns get the ewe but die young
The Huffington Post
Sometimes it's better not to be the best. Take rams. Those with bigger horns get the girl more often — but they also die younger, according to research being presented at the XIV Congress of the European Society for Evolutionary Biology. The tradeoff helps explain a long-standing puzzle about why the best genes for mating don’t take over.
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Enhance your bowhunting property with thick cover
Bow Hunting World
As forest stands mature, shade from large trees chokes out shrubs and other plants that offer secure habitat for nesting wild turkey hens, deer and other wildlife. Tree canopies can be like an umbrella preventing sunlight from reaching the forest floor during the growing season. This shading typically causes a reduction or elimination of ground cover. Secure cover is just as important to wildlife as food. Humans don’t enjoy walking through it, but nasty thick cover is guaranteed to make wildlife on your property feel right at home.
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Bow, gun hunter safety courses combine
Ithaca Times
The course is designed to cut down on time needed for hunter safety courses. Currently, hunters need to go to two separate courses, one on gun safety and one on bow safety, in order to get their certification to hunt. Doug Thornton, who runs the Spencer-Van Etten high school's Sportsman Club, said that doing two classes, which usually are at different times and at different places can be tough for kids who want to hunt. Between school, jobs and sports, being able to attend two different multiple day courses can be a real inconvenience for the kids.
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FEATURED ARTICLE
MOST POPULAR ARTICLE
TRENDING ARTICLE
Sheep study shows rams with big horns get the ewe but die young
The Huffington Post
Sometimes it's better not to be the best. Take rams. Those with bigger horns get the girl more often — but they also die younger.

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The dangers of deer cloning
Outdoor Life
A pair of Texans recently announced that they had successfully cloned a whitetail deer.

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The meat-eating habits of deer
Outdoor Hub
Many people may not know that deer, like some other herbivores, eat meat from time to time.

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Even mountain goats don't like getting caught in the rain
The Daily Mail
A herd of mountain goats were caught in bad weather in the Rocky Mountains, and dashed down the rocky sides in a frantic escape. The young kids became terrified as the storm clouds rolled in and lightning struck behind them. Shortly after happily playing under a blue sky, their eyes widen with fear and a mad rush follows to find cover as the babies head down the mountain as fast as possible.
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Hunters encouraged to review deer stand safety tips
The Chatanoogan
Many hunters utilize tree stands to give them a leg up on their quarry. However, sometimes these are improperly installed or show signs of wear after several years. As a result, hunters may find themselves a statistic in a hunting-related tree stand incident, according to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources' Wildlife Resources Division. Not every tree stand is the same. Hunters should be familiar with their particular model's features.
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NTA Cutting Edge
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Brent Mangum, Content Editor, 469.420.2602   
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