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Women are dominating the rogue taxidermy scene
VICE
When taxidermy became popular during the Victorian era, it was mostly men who hunted, skinned, fleshed and stuffed the animals. History's roster of well-known taxidermists include guys like John Hancock (not the American revolutionary), Charles Waterton, Carl Akeley, William Hornaday and John James Audubon. Few women make the list, the most famous being Martha Ann Maxwell, who is generally recognized as the first female field naturalist. Unsurprisingly, if you enter your local traditional taxidermy shop today, chances are it's run by a professionally trained old dude whose family has been in the business for generations. But taxidermy really isn't the boys' club it used to be.
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Stay safe, wear orange during hunting season
The Park Record
Utah's big hunting season is upon us. Elk hunts are now going on and the general rifle buck deer hunt begins Saturday, Oct. 18. The deer hunt is the state's most popular hunt, according to Utah's Division of Wildlife Resources. Hunters share many of Utah's lands with non-hunting hikers, so safety awareness is paramount. Here are some tips, for hunters and non-hunters alike, to help stay safe this fall.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keywords HUNTING SEASON.


Trying to lure hunters as bears get too close
The New York Times
State wildlife officials here are trying to get the word out: Bear tastes good. Hunters who bring in a bear to be weighed when the season starts in December will even receive a cookbook with recipes like "bear satay on a stick" and "grilled bear loin with brown sugar paste." The object is not really to get more people to cook bear; it is to get more people to shoot one.
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How to clean a bolt-action rifle
By John McAdams
A good rifle is one of the most important and expensive pieces of equipment for many hunters all over the world. Hunting, especially in extremely rainy or snowy weather, can really put a rifle to the test. The last thing a hunter wants is for his or her rifle to fail at a critical moment on the hunt of a lifetime. Luckily, a rifle that is properly cleaned and maintained will function reliably for many years. This article describes how to clean a bolt-action rifle.
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Taxidermy like you've never seen it before
Portland Monthly
The world of taxidermy art is often looked at with crooked stares. Many people have a hard time with the fact that this work comes from the use of dead animals. But for many in the fringe world of modern taxidermy, the craft of repurposing the bodies of dead animals is radical: both rigorous and beautiful. Robert Marbury, a Baltimore-based artist, decided to illuminate his world, a realm of art he refers to as "rogue taxidermy," in his new book "Taxidermy Art: A Rogue's Guide To the Work, the Culture, and How to Do It Yourself."
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Big-game hunting is big money for Colorado
The Coloradoan
The echoing pop of rifle shots in the aspen forests from the 500,000 blaze-orange-clad hunters in Colorado is just one small sign of the sport's massive influence on Colorado's economy. Colorado's nearly $1 billion hunting industry opened its first rifle season Oct. 11, the prime time for elk hunting as hunters — many traveling from out of state — don their camouflage and orange and go deep into the woods and their pockets to stalk big game.
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Bear spray for hunters — a reality check
High Country News
You're a big game hunter in the wilds of Wyoming, Montana or Idaho, and a grizzly is headed right for you, just like a freight train. Do you reach for bear spray, or use your rifle? For more than a decade, state and federal agencies have said hunters should use a firearm only if bear spray is unavailable.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Inside the bizarre world of rogue taxidermy (Fast Company)
Wildlife population decimated, but we needed the space (Chicago Tribune)
A morbid occupation, taxidermy still thrives in modern Singapore (Channel NewsAsia)
Bad weather means good hunting conditions for deer (Newark Advocate)
The best shooting positions for hunting (By John McAdams)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

NTA Cutting Edge
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642   
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