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4 places where hunters are working to protect game animals
National Geographic
VideoBrief As a dove hunter, Charles Lane spends hours crouched in the South Carolina woods, waiting to hear the telltale flap of wings rise into the air. But he is also a conservationist working to set aside riverways that are home to waterfowl in the heavily populated eastern U.S.
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5 essential deer-hunting tips to help you fill your tags
By John McAdams
Deer season is here in some parts of the country and is just around the corner in other places. Here are a few helpful deer-hunting tips that will hopefully help you close the deal and fill your tags this hunting season. First off, hunting with the wind in your favor is probably the single most important factor that goes into a successful deer hunt. As the saying goes: "You might fool a deer's eyes or ears, but you won't fool his nose." This is especially true when hunting mature deer who have lived through a few hunting seasons.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keywords HUNTING SEASON.


New book shows how animals are stuffed — in more ways than one
The Daily Mail
These bizarre taxidermy creations seem to tell good taste to get stuffed. The hilarious and sometimes disturbing examples of animal art have been compiled by fan and author Kat Su. Fashion designer Kat, 27, discovered the world of taxidermy when she was looking for new ways to decorate her New York apartment.
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Are crossbows easier than compounds?
American Hunter
Hunter Jeff Johnston writes: With more states legalizing crossbows for normal archery seasons, I sometimes hear traditional and compound bowhunters bemoan that crossbows are much easier to shoot and use effectively on game. Then some crossbow hunters retort that crossbows are not easier. In fact, they say, crossbows are cumbersome and they must get just as close to the game as compound bow users do. While this author believes that hunters should be allowed to hunt in any style or with whatever tool they choose — so long as it's legal in their area — I want to know: Are crossbows easier than compound bows to use effectively?
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Hunterdon taxidermy business expands into booking hunting trips, selling firearms
Hunterdon County Democrat via NJ.com
Want to hunt for moose? Dan Wyant Jr. will book you a Newfoundland hunting trip, including a guide, helicopter transport and license; sell you a rifle; and when you get back he'll mount the moose head. Wyant, almost 63, grew up in Bloomsbury, and at age 10 began hunting on the Bethlehem Township farm of his grandfather, Howard Segreaves. At about age 13 he took a correspondence course in taxidermy, learning on squirrels that were plentiful but small and hard to work on. He also worked on pheasants, grouse and pigeons. Part of his motivation was to taunt his competitive brothers with his hunting prowess.
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Hunter donations to cover big game processing
The Associated Press via Flathead Beacon
A new law is making it easier for Montana hunters to donate big game meat to food banks. The 2103 Legislature passed a law creating a way for hunters to donate $1 or more to Hunters Against Hunger when they buy big game hunting licenses. The money is used to process donated wild game meat for distribution to food banks.
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How to safely carry a firearm in the field
AmmoLand
Hunting in a group is a lot of fun, but it creates new safety concerns. When you're alone, you can carry your gun a lot of different ways, but in a group, you need to always be aware of your companions (including your dog). As hunting season approaches, it's a good time to brush up on your fundamentals. And if you're teaching a new hunter, this is extra important.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Women are dominating the rogue taxidermy scene (VICE)
Taxidermy like you've never seen it before (Portland Monthly)
Big-game hunting is big money for Colorado (The Coloradoan)
How to clean a bolt-action rifle (By John McAdams)
Trying to lure hunters as bears get too close (The New York Times)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


 

NTA Cutting Edge
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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Ashley Whipple, Senior Content Editor, 469.420.2642   
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