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Designer's tips on ethical taxidermy
The Argus
Road kill designer Jess Eaton is revealing her secrets to the public for the first time in a unique workshop. The Brighton-based conceptual artist is famous for her Roadkill Couture collection, which used parts of animals that have died of natural causes or killed for food or as pests, including headpieces worn by Kate Moss and Lady Gaga.
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Taxidermy stuffed and sealed
The Age
VideoBriefWallabies, possums and a brown spotted cous cous from the 1870s are among a taxidermy collection being exhibited by the University of Sydney Macleay Museum.
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Animals frozen in time
Ellwood City Ledger
Entering the lower level of Paul Hazen's home is a surreal experience, like a glimpse into Noah’s ark. The door opens into an unreal world of silent, still animals. A shaggy, six-foot-long muskox with long, curved horns stands near a blue wildebeest from Africa and a grizzly bear from Alaska. All are all frozen in time. "This is my life," Hazen said.
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Local history: Local taxidermist tackled tough, high-profile projects
The Scranton Times-Tribune
George P. Friant's illustrious career ultimately killed him. The lifelong resident of Scranton was just 56 when he died of arsenic poisoning, according to a Jan. 26, 1916, obituary in The Scranton Times. Arsenic was widely used as a preservative in taxidermy, and Friant was one of the best-known taxidermists in Pennsylvania. For years, Friant's shop was on Lackawanna Avenue in Downtown Scranton. He moved the shop a few blocks away on West Lackawanna Avenue a few years before his untimely death. Although he isn't a household name in Scranton, Friant's work can still be seen locally at the Everhart Museum. For years, animals he preserved were on display at Penn State's main campus and Wyoming Seminary.
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Taxidermist seeks to create works of art
Mat-Su Valley Frontiersman
Juli Wolter's shop on Bogard Road — Alaska Wildlife Rugs and Taxidermy — has a lot of different animals in it. There's a cougar, a couple of foxes, even a giraffe. The work seems varied. Some have been made into rugs, others are on wall-hanging mounts and still other sit on bases or cling to trees. But she said she tends to stick to just one region of the animal kingdom.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keywords HANGING MOUNTS.


From mermaids to monsters: The taxidermy mummies on show in Japan
RocketNews24
In the mid-19th century, a showman named P. T. Barnum exhibited an oddity named the Fiji mermaid. Barnum's mummified mermaid, one of the most famous hoaxes of all time, is widely believed to have been the body of a young monkey sewn onto a fish tail, and had been bought from Japanese sailors for $6,000. These oddball objects were popular at Edo-period sideshow carnivals called misemono, but these days we are more likely to see them in temples and museums. Here are four kinds of creepy creatures on show in Japan.
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Alternative taxidermists give old life new meaning
Newsworks.org
Shannah Warwick stroked her cat, Goulash, around the neck and sighed. "She was a diva in life, and I told her for years that I was going to stuff her," the fashion designer said of her beloved, now three and a half years passed.
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A day at Kate Latimer's taxidermy workshop
Oxford Mail
Marc West writes: "On your day of rest, what's better than enjoying a traditional Sunday lunch — roast beef, crispy potatoes, Yorkshire pudding and all the trimmings. But, last weekend, as I pulled up a chair at noon there was in front of me on the table... a mouse! And, it was clear my afternoon was going to be somewhat different to usual. Welcome to the (ever so slightly) weird, yet truly wonderful world of Kate Latimer."
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NTA Cutting Edge
Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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