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Taxidermists talk survival in tough times
Republican Herald
It takes more than knives, chemicals and a collection of glass eyes to make it in the taxidermy business. "Your work has to stand out. And you have to get out there and market what you do," Dennis G. Wessner, 42, owner of Pennsylvania's Wessner's Taxidermy said. The troubled economy isn't inspiring too many local hunters to mount their bucks this year, according to Wessner and Mike Brown, 43, owner of Brown Bear Taxidermy Studio in Pine Grove, Pa. Inflation is making it difficult for taxidermists. The price of supplies is going up, Brown said. To help their businesses survive, both Brown and Wessner market their skills to hunters worldwide.
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Virginia man may have killed largest bear in state history
WSET-TV
VideoBriefA Charlotte County, Va., native may have killed the largest bear in Virginia on record. Tyler Napier was hunting on his parent's farm in Keysville when he came across a black bear. The bear weighs 728 pounds and is 7' 2" inches tall.
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Big storms offer chances for bucks
Northern Viriginia Daily
Hunting before a major snowstorm blows in can be immensely productive because deer can sense it coming and will be up and moving. Hunting immediately after it clears out can also be excellent because deer will be hungry and getting up to feed after hunkering down during the storm. But what if this scenario unfolds: the storm comes on the day you have off work and it's the only time you can hunt? What if you scheduled vacation time and want to be out there, whether there's a storm or not, rather than staying in camp?
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    With amateur taxidermy, you get what you pay for (Roanoke Times)
How Western Kentucky became a big buck hot spot (Field & Stream)
See head-butting rams at Utah's Bighorn Sheep viewing day (The Salt Lake Tribune)
Endangered and threatened wildlife and plants; listing the straight-horned markhor as threatened with special rule (Federal Register)

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McAuliffe likely faces steep climb in toughening Virginia's gun laws
WJLA-TV
The nation recently marked one year since the mass shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., that left 26 people dead, including 20 kids sitting at their desks. Despite the almost immediate plea from President Barack Obama for Congress to enact tougher standards such as universal background checks for gun purchasers — a measure that had more than 80 percent national approval in poll after poll — little has happened toward that end amid fierce resistance from the National Rifle Association. And then there's Virginia, where a similar fate likely awaits.
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This taxidermied mice chess set is the coolest thing ever
The Huffington Post
VideoBrief Now you can play out the battle for Redwall right in front of you — with stuffed mice. These black and white, custom taxidermy pieces, made by Etsy user TheCurious13, make up what might be the most creative chess set ever. Rachael Garcia, 31, spoke to HuffPost Weird about her full set of real (dead) mice, adorned in armor and royal garb.
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Taxidermists talk survival in tough times
Republican Herald
It takes more than knives, chemicals and a collection of glass eyes to make it in the taxidermy business. "Your work has to stand out. And you have to get out there and market what you do," Dennis G. Wessner, 42, owner of Pennsylvania's Wessner's Taxidermy said. The troubled economy isn't inspiring too many local hunters to mount their bucks this year, according to Wessner and Mike Brown, 43, owner of Brown Bear Taxidermy Studio in Pine Grove, Pa. Inflation is making it difficult for taxidermists. The price of supplies is going up, Brown said. To help their businesses survive, both Brown and Wessner market their skills to hunters worldwide.

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How Western Kentucky became a big buck hot spot
Field & Stream
Carl Doran is owner of Snipe Creek Lodge, one of the largest whitetail outfitters in Kentucky — a state with deer hunting ranked No. 1 in the nation by both Field and Stream and Outdoor Life in the past. Doran is a frequent resource for Field and Stream's Mid-South Rut Reports, and he certainly has a unique insight into the factors that are turning the Bluegrass State into a booming place for big bucks.

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With amateur taxidermy, you get what you pay for
Roanoke Times
There's a bit of a learning curve when it comes to taking a dead critter and bringing it back to life. Taxidermy is something many kids who grow up hunting and fishing try at some point. Kids gawked at every mounted deer or elk head they came across. The reamed of the day they would kill my first buck, and gave lots of thought to how I would preserve and display the trophy.

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Wolves make for good business
Western News
When John Hayes started studying taxidermy he didn’t think it one day would be his livelihood. After stints with logging, working at sawmills and time in the forests, Hayes came back to what he loves, recreating wildlife art. An admitted predator hunter — pursuing coyotes and wolves — Hayes said he has found his taxidermy niche in preserving these contentious canines.
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Virginia hunter takes monster piebald buck
Outdoor Life
Brandon Seward sent us these photos of a slammer piebald buck from his family farm in Wakefield. A piebald buck is fairly rare but what makes this deer interesting is how big it is. Most of the piebald photos that come across my desk show spike bucks or forks. In his own words, here's how Brandon's hunt went down.
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Taxidermy film wins big at New Zealand awards
NZ News
The New Zealand Film Awards recognize the best in local cinema but this year's winner of the self-funded short film award was in French. Jacques Gilbert is a taxidermist and the star of a now award-winning documentary. "A documentary is basically about the character, even more when the documentary relies on one character so I think we were extremely lucky to find him," says Le Taxidermiste director Prisca Bouchet. "I think we were extremely lucky that he was so open about everything."
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How to buy taxidermy
Men's Journal
There was a time when great taxidermy was the exclusive province of hunters and natural history museum collections. A decade ago, if asked where you last saw an animal trophy, you might have mentioned a dive bar in Durango. Today, you might say "the barbershop," "the tailor," or "my friend's house." We are, after all, living through what Paul Rhymer, the last staff taxidermist at the Smithsonian, calls "the good old days of taxidermy." The craft has never been more refined and mounts have never been easier to come by. Our rapacious appetite for flannel-shirted, hunting-lodge-chic Americana has increased both supply and demand for roaring cougars and comatose moose.
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