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Doctors' virtual consults with patients to double by 2020
Forbes
Thanks to expanding health insurance coverage, the number of virtual video consultations between primary healthcare providers and their patients will double in five years in the U.S. fueling the nation's telehealth boom, according to a new analysis. A new report from information and analytics firm IHS says video consultations will jump overall to nearly 27 million in the U.S. market, driven by the primary care market where insurance coverage is rapidly widening.
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Texas doctors train on newly patented artificial uterus
KXAN-TV
With the new Dell Medical School coming sometime late in 2016, a lot of new medical innovations and inventions are expected in Austin, Texas, soon. Some of them will be used to train doctors and nurses for the future. Training for a medical crisis can be difficult without a real live patient. Luckily, Austin-area doctors have "Nellie," the $64,000 training mannequin.
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Best medical schools linked to top-notch hospitals
U.S. News & World Report
At almost any medical school, soon-to-be doctors will get years of hands-on and classroom training in preparation for their careers. But there are perks that come with going to a school that's affiliated with a prestigious hospital. "You get to see the medical cases that are really complex," says Sahil Mehta, a graduate of the Pritzker School of Medicine at the University of Chicago, which is affiliated with NorthShore University HealthSystem. "You get to see a wide variety of disease."
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Tiny 3-D printed heart makes infant surgery possible
Wired
We've already been promised a 3-D printed heart within the next 10 years. But in the interim, there's a lot the additive manufacturing technique can do to help aid the most complex of heart surgeries. A reminder of this is the case of 11-month-old Lavesh Navedkar, who received lifesaving heart surgery to fix a rare congenital defect, thanks to a detailed 3-D printed model of his tiny organ.
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What would the world look like to someone with a bionic eye?
University of Washington
Various sight recovery therapies are being developed by companies around the world, offering new hope for people who are blind. But little is known about what the world will look like to patients who undergo those procedures. A new University of Washington study seeks to answer that question and offers visual simulations of what someone with restored vision might see.
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New partnership aims to provide high-tech healthcare learning opportunities for pediatric patients
University of Texas at Arlington via News-Medical.Net provides
A new partnership between The University of Texas at Arlington Libraries and Cook Children's Medical Center in Fort Worth, Texas, will mean new high-tech healthcare learning opportunities for pediatric patients. Thanks to an Emerging Technology Award from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine South Central Region, UTA Libraries will be able to help children and their families explore health conditions and treatments using 3-D printers, 3-D scanners and microelectronics.
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Does a medical school degree guarantee diagnosis skills?
MedPage Today
"First do no harm," a phrase found in Epidemics, Book I, of the Hippocratic school, is a core principle in the education of medical students and is the belief of the patients being treated by their physician. Unfortunately, misdiagnosis results in an estimated 40,000 to 80,000 U.S. hospital deaths annually, and approximately 5 percent of autopsies identify lethal diagnostic errors for which a correct diagnosis with proper treatment could have averted the death.
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Time to act on discrimination, bullying in medical training
Medical News Today
Changing policies and guidelines will not be enough to stamp out the sexual harassment, bullying and discrimination experienced by female medical trainees - changing the design of medical education itself is the only solution, according to the author of a Perspective in the Medical Journal of Australia. Professor Merrilyn Walton, professor of medical education at the University of Sydney, wrote that "being a senior doctor is not a qualification for teaching in itself."
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The art of compassion
Nadine A. Kassity-Krich
Starting out in the neonatal intensive care unit, the excitement for me was the adrenaline rush that came from caring for very sick patients, and figuring out what to do as quickly as possible to help "cure" the child. That still held true for my entire ICU career, but as time moved on, and I witnessed many sick patients and grieving families, it became clear to me that compassion was a consistent and integral part of my day.
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HIE critical to emergency medicine, but info lacking in ERs
HealthData Management
Care standards and protocols to support data exchange in emergency department electronic health records need to be developed, including workflow optimizations and pushing of important information to the clinician through "flags" in the EHR. Those are among the recommendations from an emergency physician-led workgroup on how to maximize the value of health information exchange in emergency departments. The five primary and seven secondary recommendations were published online recently in Annals of Emergency Medicine.
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How healthcare leaders can tackle customer service
Forbes
Customer service in healthcare and education is inherently different from commercial customer service situations for one reason in particular. The customer isn't always right. Now, you may protest, the customer isn't always right anywhere, and you're correct.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    1st 3-D printed drug gets FDA approval (Reuters)
NICU simulation lab sees continuous improvement (Healthcare Design)
Seton Healthcare creates mannequins to test intrauterine surgery (KVUE-TV)
The impact of health IT on workflow (Scott E. Rupp)
Medical education funding faces physician shortage problems (Healthcare Finance)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.
 

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Colby Horton, Vice President of Publishing, 469.420.2601
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