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Home   Communities   Publications   Education   Issues   Convention   Join TESOL   April 08, 2014

 





Pupils who speak English as a second language defy the odds to win a debating competition
Wales Online
United Kingdom: Pupils who speak English as a second language have defied the odds to come first in an inter-school debating competition. Kitchener Primary School youngsters Ibado Hussein, Banna Ari-Ali and Farah Abdo were announced as the winners of an English-Speaking Union tournament, in which 10 local schools took part. "I was so proud I could have cried," said Jan Musto, literary co-ordinator at Kitchener Primary in Riverside, Cardiff. "I am absolutely over the moon." The three 10-year-old girls debated about whether parents should be able to choose the sex of their baby.
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For Latino parents, bilingual classrooms aren't just about language
Boise State Public Radio
Right now, across the country, parents are in the midst of trying to get their children enrolled in bilingual classrooms for next September. The motivation is usually straightforward. Parents want their kids to learn a foreign language. The thinking is that a second language will bring significant cultural and economic advantages. But for many Latino parents (and others as well) there is something more at play; namely, it can feel like the family language is at stake. (The loss of Spanish-language fluency among native-born Latinos is a widespread phenomenon.) Bilingual classrooms are seen as a way of ensuring children will be able to read, write and speak Spanish.
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Everything you wanted to know about teaching English in Peru
Peru this Week
Peru: There is a growing need for English teachers in Peru because many Peruvians are able to find better jobs if they can speak English. Therefore, TEFL teaching has become an important part of the economy in Peru and native English speakers are able to find relatively well-paid jobs in the country. Coupled with the relative ease in finding teaching work in the country, you will be surrounded by an old and fascinating culture like no other place on earth. On top of this, there is a lot to see and do in Peru with beautiful beaches, stunning mountains and dense jungles.
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Call for participation for the 2015 TESOL convention
TESOL
The 2015 TESOL International Convention & English Language Expo takes place 25–28 March in Toronto, Canada. Session proposals and proposals for Pre- and Postconvention Institutes (PCIs) are due Monday, 2 June 2014, 11:59 pm Eastern Daylight Time. Find the deadline in your time zone.
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TESOL book shortlisted for prestigious ELTon award
TESOL
"Language Teaching Insights From Other Fields: Sports, Arts, Design and More," edited by Christopher Stillwell and published by TESOL Press, has been nominated for an ELTon in the category Innovation in Teacher Resources. The ELTons, sponsored by Cambridge English, are the only international awards to recognise innovation in the field of English language teaching. Winners will be announced at the award ceremony in London in May. Read a free chapter.
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SHOWCASE
  Put your passion into practice

Teach with a purpose. SIT students learn to teach language for social change, advocacy, education, and empowerment. SIT now has a summer low-residency program that offers current teachers the same highly regarded TESOL graduate education as the SIT on campus program.
Learn more at sit.edu/tesol.
 


Just off press!
TESOL
Two long awaited books are now off press: "The Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts for English Language Learners: Grades K–5," edited by Pamela Spycher, and "The Common Core State Standards in Mathematics for English Language Learners Grades K–8," edited by Marta Civil and Erin Turner. Both are under the series editorship of Luciana C. de Oliveira and both provide guidance, practical information, and pedagogical practices for teachers who have ELLs in their classrooms. Read a free chapter of English Language Arts and of Mathematics.
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TRENDING ARTICLE
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Hearing aids in children associated with improved speech, language abilities
Medical News Today
Fitting children with mild to severe hearing loss with hearing aids appears to be associated with better speech and language development.

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Why Chinese schools must push English more than ever
WorldCrunch
China: After months of public debate, China's Education Ministry has finally decided that the college entrance exam will no longer include the subject of English. Instead, students will take several English tests spread over the course of the school year.

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What it takes (and means) to learn English as an adult
NPR
Ana Perez never made it to high school. Her education ended after the sixth grade, when war broke out in her native El Salvador. She says she's "desperate" to learn English, but she gets nervous trying to speak it.

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British Council builds capacity of English language teachers
Citi FM
Ghana: About sixty teachers from junior high schools in the La Dadekotopon District in the Greater Accra Region have benefited from a training workshop to enhance their proficiency in English language. The workshop, which was under the auspices of the British Council, with support from Resource Link Centre, an academic support facility, was also geared towards building the capacity of teachers and sensitizing them to efficient ways of making the study of English language more appealing to their students. It was also to bring teachers from the various schools together to learn and brainstorm on measures to help their students in the areas of reading, grammar, vocabulary, comprehension, composition and critical thinking.
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Norwich, Vt., teacher helps newcomers navigate English
The Associated Press via The Washington Times
As an adult education English language teacher, Kathleen Pounch has learned she has to be ready for anything — even the question "What does 'Oh man!' mean?" A student asked the question because her own child kept using the American expression “for everything," Pounch said. "They put it in their translators, and it doesn't translate," Pounch said, referring to digital translators many English language students use to compare English words to comparable words in native languages.
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SHOWCASE
  LAS Links Assessments Go Online

Identify the needs of your English Language Learners with an automated, time-saving assessment tool in speaking, listening, and reading. LAS Links Online™ is designed to strengthen your English Language Development Program and provides research-based results to support your instructional decisions.
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Districts' stringent criteria can delay reclassifying English learners
EdSource
English learners have been a subject of policy concern in California since the early 1970s. The needs of these students — who make up about 25 percent of the state's public school students today — are well documented. On a host of measures, they lag behind their English-speaking peers. However, English learners who have been reclassified as fluent English speakers perform very well, sometimes even surpassing the achievements of native English speakers. A longstanding question for policymakers and educators is how to more quickly transition English learners to English proficiency.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword ENGLISH.


Mandatory training tailors teaching to non-English speakers
The Reading Advocate
When 61 percent of Massachusetts voters in 2002 elected to have all students learn core subjects in English, the new law immediately changed bilingual education across the state. The landmark vote abolished the traditional bilingual model of education, whereby students were slowly acclimated to their new language, and fully immersed them in English, limiting exposure to their native tongue.
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Teachers, parents protest end of bilingual program
The Boston Globe
As the state moves to take over the Dever Elementary School in Dorchester, many teachers and parents are protesting a plan to scrap a popular program that aims to make students fluent in both English and Spanish. State officials say the dual-language program played a major role in the Dever's persistently low test scores that caused it to slide into receivership and they believe that an English-only approach to instruction is the best way to boost achievement. The recommendation delivers a setback for the Boston school system as it prepares a major expansion of dual-language schools to accommodate demand by families who are either native speakers of English or another language. It also is rekindling a debate about the extent to which a language other than English should be used in the teaching of math, science and other academic subjects.
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Nashville, Tenn., language initiative gets national attention
The Tennessean
An innovative online map that tells English language learners where they can take classes in Nashville, Tenn., has received national attention. In its first week, the "ESL map" added listings for almost 30 venues where non-native speakers can go to take English as a second language courses. The map, hosted by the Metro Human Relations Commission, is online at www.ESLmap.com. Classes are searchable by cost, location, frequency and level of instruction and are now listed in Nashville, Nolensville and Clarksville.
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PRODUCT SHOWCASE
  Register Now: CAL Institutes
Professional Development Opportunities in Washington DC

CAL Institutes provide research-based strategies and practical, hands-on tools to help educators develop effective classroom activities on a variety of key topics, including meeting the demands of the Common Core State Standards.

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Alphabet soup for English teachers, learners
The Phuket News
Digesting TEFL's alphabet soup of acronyms can be daunting. Here are some of the most basic terms every teacher should know before interviewing with a school or entering the classroom. The difference between TEFL and TESL is all about location. Teaching English as a foreign language is done in Thailand and anywhere else English is a foreign language. Teaching English as a second language is done in the U.K., the U.S. and anywhere English is spoken as a first language. Lessons should be created with that in mind and the disciplines can have significant differences.
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Read up on ways that can help us learn English
The Japan Times
Japan: Public libraries are important community resources across Japan, but while English is taught from fifth grade, those hoping to find a ready stash of English-language reading material may be disappointed. Thanks to the efforts of two men passionate about the power and potential of books, however, Iwakura Public Library in Kyoto boasts a collection that would be the envy of libraries twice its size. The small library, located in Sakyo-ku on the northern side of the city, has a total of 57,000 books, more than 1,500 of which are in English.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    English lessons for Jamaica (Jamaica Observer)
Train teachers to help children with no English (The Yorkshire Post)
British Council launches $7 million English language development project (Myanmar Times)
Improving your teaching craft through personalized development (By: Beth Crumpler)
Speaking key to language fluency (The Korea Times)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.




Hearing aids in children associated with improved speech, language abilities
Medical News Today
Fitting children with mild to severe hearing loss with hearing aids appears to be associated with better speech and language development. Poor communication skills at the end of the preschool years can affect social, academic and work success later in life. Hearing loss in childhood is a contributor to poor speech and language development. HAs can enhance speech and language development.
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Research measure also takes subtle jab at Common Core
Education Week
Bipartisan research legislation that's slated to pass the House education committee very soon — and likely the full U.S. House of Representatives — takes aim at the Obama administration's championship of the Common Core State Standards (albeit in an indirect, back-handed, kind of way). The bill is the fairly obscure, politically-low key reauthorization of the Education Sciences Reform Act, aka ESRA, which governs the Institute of Education Sciences, the U.S. Department of Education's independent research arm.
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Early concerns about e-books' effect on reading comprehension, researchers say
Education Week
Digital devices and online reading materials are flooding U.S. schools, but there are some early reasons to worry whether they are helping children better learn to read. That was the message from a husband-and-wife research team from West Chester University who presented two studies here as part of the annual conference of the American Educational Research Association.
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The importance of grit in a positive school culture
By: Brian Stack
I recently visited a high school in which every teacher had posted in their classroom a large sign that said "Keep calm and have guts." When I asked students and teachers what this poster meant to each of them, they unanimously said it meant they needed to practice grit and determination. Teachers at this school continually encourage students to persevere through difficult academic, civic and social situations both in and out of the classroom. It is this fostering of grit, they argued, that would best prepare their students for the real world.
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Common Core has students writing — on just about every subject
The Hechinger Report
In the early elementary school grades, Zachary Davis and his classmates at Belle Chasse Primary School in suburban New Orleans wrote almost entirely from personal experience: describing their ideal vacation, trying to convince readers that a longer school year would be a good (or bad) idea, penning a letter about their adventures during summer break. That all changed this school year. As a fourth-grader, Zachary more rarely writes stories or essays based solely on his experience or imaginative musings anymore. Instead, it's all about citing "textual evidence." "In third grade they would just ask us to, like, describe your dream store. It was easy to me," said Zachary, adding that he enjoys the new challenge.
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The TESOL English Language Bulletin is presented as a service to members of TESOL International Association and other English language teaching professionals. For information about TESOL member benefits, visit www.tesol.org or contact us at membership@tesol.org.

TESOL English Language Bulletin is a digest of the most important news selected for TESOL International Association from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. TESOL International Association does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of TESOL.

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