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Home   Communities   Publications   Education   Issues   Convention   Join TESOL   May. 8, 2013

 





Native-speaking English teachers in decline
The Prague Post
Czech Republic: Kirsty Mooney, 40, was fresh out of university when she decided to leave her hometown of Rochdale, in north England, and move to the Czech Republic. Mooney quickly found work teaching English to Czech students. But for the better part of two decades, her career, like those of many native-language teachers here, has been fraught with difficulties. She sums up the current state of foreign-speaking language teachers at Czech state schools as dire, leaving many to contemplate a career change.
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Arizona school board to wade into English-immersion program fight
Tucson Sentinel
Vince Yanez understands what the Arizona Board of Education could be getting in to this year when it begins a "systematic review" of the state's English language learner program. "Since the models had been created, there have been very strong opinions on both sides," said Yanez, the board's executive director. "The models" he is referring to are Structured English Immersion, a state-mandated program that puts non-English-speaking students into English class for four hours a day.
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Background knowledge: Why is it important for ELL programs?
By Erick Herrmann
Background knowledge — we all have it. All humans, throughout their lives, have learned about the world around them. Babies explore the world under the careful watch of their caregivers, children learn by playing with others and going to school, and adults continue their journey of learning about the world through work and social situations. When it comes to English learners and students from diverse cultural and educational backgrounds, the type and amount of background knowledge related to a particular topic can vary.
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Registration open — ESL for the Secondary Mathematics Teacher
TESOL
The previously sold-out online course ESL for the Secondary Mathematics Teacher will run again from 3–30 June 2013. Participants will learn about core ESL principles and practices, the role of language and culture in learning mathematics, planning and implementing instruction for English language learners, and assessment. Deadline to register is Monday, 27 May. Don't miss your opportunity. Places fill quickly! Questions can be sent to edprograms@tesol.org and put "ESL Math" in the subject line.
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TESOL Academies: 21-22 June 2013
TESOL
Join TESOL at Bethel University in St. Paul, Minnesota or University of Maryland Baltimore County in Baltimore, Maryland for intensive, hands-on workshops for a wide variety of TESOL practitioners. The academies feature six 10-hour workshops focused on key issues and areas of practice in the profession. Earn continuing education credits, network with colleagues from across the U.S., and gain practical insights on how to implement the latest classroom practices. Discounted early registration rates end 24 May, so don't delay! Visit www.tesol.org/bethel or www.tesol.org/umbc for more information.
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If you haven't read the TESOL bloggers lately. . .
TESOL
New, regular bloggers are sharing their expertise with the field, covering everything from technology in education to English for specific purposes to adult education as well as fresh ideas for the classroom. The revitalized blogs are just one more way that TESOL International Association provides its members and the public with expert knowledge and opportunities to participate in the field of English language education. Check out some of the latest bloggers and posts at blog.tesol.org.
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Call for authors: deadline 15 June 2013
TESOL
TESOL Press is publishing a book on recent research and classroom practices for teaching idioms to ESL/EFL students around the world. Authors Paul McPherron and Patrick T. Randolph are seeking contributors to submit brief summary reports of lessons that focus on learning and teaching idioms. Contributors can submit lessons that they have used with English language learners at any proficiency level and in any teaching/learning context. See the full call for submissions. Deadline is 15 June 2013.
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Students want more mobile devices in classroom
InformationWeek
When it comes to the influx of mobile devices into K-12 classrooms, you'll find both proponents and opponents among educators and parents. But ask kids what they think, and there's no debate: Laptops, smartphones and tablets are the future, they say.

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International schools boom as more seek education in English
International Herald Tribune
Hong Kong: A century ago, there were only a handful of international schools in the world, mostly set up by Western corporations so overseas employees would have a place to educate their children.

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Engaging learners through games: Help or hype?
eSchool News
"Engagement" has become a popular buzzword, as educators increasingly cite disengaged students as a problem that needs to be fixed. In this context, games are often trumpeted as the perfect tool for creating student engagement.

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Rebelling against Quebec's 'language police'
BBC News
Canada: Quebec's ruling Parti Quebecois is pushing a new law through the provincial parliament that would further reduce the use of English in schools, hospitals and shops. As a result, many Anglophones fear they are being squeezed into insignificance. For Harry Schick, owner of a pastry shop in Pointe Claire, an English-speaking municipality west of Montreal, it is nothing new.
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Rewards for schools key facet of NCLB waivers
Education Week
One of the chief complaints about the No Child Left Behind Act has been that districts and schools that fail to meet achievement targets face serious sanctions, while schools that do a good job of closing the gaps between traditionally overlooked groups of students and their peers essentially get little in return. To help alleviate those concerns, the U.S. Department of Education asked states to identify so-called "reward schools" in their applications for waivers easing demands of the NCLB law, the current version of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, which Congress has yet to revise.
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Media weighs in on LDP's English education plan
The Japan Times
Japan: The Liberal Democratic Party has a thing for archery. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's financial policies comprise "three arrows." The symbolism is based on the old Japanese saying, "Three arrows are harder to break." Since Abenomics has proven to be a PR success, at least with the electorate, he's using the same metaphor to push his education agenda, a "three-arrow" approach that 1) reclaims dominance in the areas of science and math, 2) emphasizes IT education and 3) improves English language skills.
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Report: Federal rules impede competency-based learning
MindShift
Competency-based learning, which allows students to progress at their own pace after they've shown mastery of a subject, rather than by their age, is quickly gaining momentum. Already, a few states like New Hampshire, Maine and Oregon are moving towards implementing competency-based learning models throughout the entire state. What's more, 40 states have at least one district experimenting with the model. But despite this growth, its proponents say federal policies for accountability and assessment are holding the movement back.
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English language learners, Common Core and literacy
Education Week
Two prominent language-acquisition scholars will be my guests in an edweek.org webinar that will focus on helping educators prepare for teaching the Common Core State Standards to English language learners. Kenji Hakuta, a Stanford University education professor, and George C. Bunch, an associate education professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz, will present on how the new English/language arts and literacy standards can be fully accessed by all English learners, regardless of their proficiency levels.
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Minister: Nigeria to employ 1,000 English language, mathematics teachers for 104 unity colleges
Premium Times
Nigeria: The federal government plans to employ more than 1,000 English language and mathematics teachers for the 104 unity colleges Nigeria. The Minister of State for Education, Nyesom Wike, disclosed this when he declared open the first phase of a continuous professional development program for mathematics and English language teachers in Abuja. He expressed the federal government's worry over the poor performance of students of federal government colleges in public examinations.
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Report: English learners need more philanthrophic investment
Education Week
English learners are the fastest-growing subgroup of students in public schools and will likely be so for the next decade, but education philanthropy dollars targeted toward the unique needs of these students haven't kept pace, a new report says. The Portland, Ore.-based Grantmakers for Education, a membership organization for public and private education-related philanthropies, has just published an analysis of the current state of grantmaking meant to improve educational outcomes for English learners. The main finding: The level of investment in ELLs is "relatively small" and "small in comparison to the magnitude of this population and the depth of educational need."
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Wausau, Wis., schools deal with minority achievement gap
Wausau Daily Herald
Minority students overall lag significantly behind their white peers in the Wausau School District in Wisconsin, reflecting the racial achievement gap that affects students across the state. But Wausau minority students in general outperform minority students from across the state, and in some isolated cases, outpace white counterparts, according to the results of the standardized tests given through the Wisconsin Student Assessment System. Those results were released by the state's Department of Public Instruction in late April.
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States' online testing problems raise Common Core concerns
Education Week
Widespread technical failures and interruptions of recent online testing in a number of states have shaken the confidence of educators and policymakers in high-tech assessment methods and raised serious concerns about schools' technological readiness for the coming Common Core online tests. The glitches arose as many districts in the 46 states that have signed on to the Common Core State Standards are trying to ramp up their technological infrastructure to prepare for the requirement that students take online assessments starting in 2014-2015.
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Hispanics now largest ethnic group in Texas' public schools
The Dallas Morning News
Hispanics have passed whites as the largest ethnic group in Texas schools, making up almost 51 percent of public school enrollment. The influx of Hispanic students, many from poor families, has brought about many changes in classrooms, with more expected as that population continues to grow. Some schools already struggle with how to teach an increasing number of poor children who don't speak English. Others are preparing for a day when their enrollment primarily is made up of low-income students, most of them Hispanic.
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Ideas for English language learners — Celebrating the end of the school year
The New York Times
School calendars are different across the nation, so while classes may be in session for another two months where you teach, in another district, it's time for prom, awards season and commencement. Below are some ideas for reflecting on the school year that can be adapted to wherever you are in the semester, and for students of any age and with any level of English proficiency.
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East Aurora tries more English earlier for bilingual students
Aurora Deacon News
Diane Argueta, East Aurora School District's director of bilingual services in Illinois, stood at the head of the Gates Elementary cafeteria pointing at a slide on a projector that outlined the objectives of the district's bilingual education program. About 50 Spanish-speaking parents, many of whom brought their young children, sat at cafeteria tables watching intently as Argueta reviewed the goals: teach children how to speak, read and write fluently in English and help them meet or exceed academic standards on state exams.
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English language learner purgatory?
The Santa Barbara Independent
It was hard to keep count of the number of times Superintendent David Cash told parents at Franklin Elementary School in California "We have a lot of work to do." He often uttered that sentiment — while delivering a "state of the schools" address — to stress the lagging outcomes for children with disabilities, socioeconomically disadvantaged students, English language learners and Latinos.
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Teaching in English creates problems for Danish universities
The Copenhagen Post
Denmark: Danish universities are increasingly teaching in English in order to remain attractive to international researchers and students, but the development presents challenges for the teachers and students for whom English is a second language. To address these challenges, a collection of Nordic researchers have been studying the effect of increasing English language teaching on university education in their countries.
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US orders new visa reviews for arriving students
The Boston Globe
The Homeland Security Department ordered border agents "effective immediately" to verify that every international student who arrives in the U.S. has a valid student visa, according to an internal memorandum obtained by The Associated Press. The new procedure is the government's first security change directly related to the Boston bombings. The order from a senior official at U.S. Customs and Border Protection, David J. Murphy, was circulated and came one day after the Obama administration acknowledged that a student from Kazakhstan accused of hiding evidence for one of the Boston bombing suspects was allowed to return to the U.S. in January without a valid student visa.
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Chinese student's English 'talent' not enough
The Austrailian
Australia: A Chinese student who secured two degrees from an Australian university, and then a job in his chosen field, has failed to persuade a tribunal that he has competent English. The migration review tribunal said it simply could not take into account Hao Shen's apparent success after almost seven years in an English-speaking environment. Shen went to the tribunal after the immigration department refused his application for a skilled graduate visa.
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Know your international student — Global or glocal?
University World News
The number of globally mobile international students has been consistently increasing for decades. At the same time, the number of "glocal" students engaged in transnational education — students staying in their home country (region) while gaining a foreign education — has also been increasing. How are "global" students different from "glocal" students, and how is their mobility likely to take shape in the future?
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Setting national standards for English learners is formidable task
UC Davis News & Information
Arriving at a national definition of English language learner is a formidable task, best undertaken in a years-long process, a University of California, Davis, expert argued at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association in San Francisco. According to Jamal Abedi, a professor of education at UC Davis who focuses on educational and psychological assessments, states use such a wide variety of criteria to evaluate English learners that devising common standards is complex.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    The cultural impact on effective and ineffective reading strategies (By Ream Odetallah)
International schools boom as more seek education in English (International Herald Tribune)
California sued for lack of services to students learning English (Los Angeles Times)
10 creative ways to teach English that deliver outstanding results (The Guardian)
Appeal filed vs. decision on Arizona's English language learner programs (The Arizona Republic)


Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Polishing English language skills
Deccan Herald
India: Bangalore has its fair share of foreign students, who come to pursue higher education. English is the most commonly spoken language and most of these foreign students, who have a problem communicating in English, end up going to classes to learn the language. To help these students learn the language, the colleges provide intensive English training for foreign applicants during summer to help them cope with classes before the college starts. They also provide basic information about Indian culture.
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Most parents support mobile learning devices
eClassroom News
A majority of parents overwhelmingly think that mobile apps, mobile content and technology in the classroom promote positive learning habits and yield benefits, according to a new survey released on May 2. "Living and Learning with Mobile Devices: What Parents Think About Mobile Devices for Early Childhood and K-12 Learning," from Grunwald Associates, the Learning First Alliance, and underwritten by AT&T, surveyed 2,392 parents who have 4,164 children between the ages of 3-18.
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Poll: Many teachers say they need training in Common Core standards
The Washington Post
Most public school teachers feel unprepared to teach math and reading to the Common Core standards that are rolling out in 45 states and the District, according to a poll of 800 teachers released by the American Federation of Teachers. The new standards, written by a group of states and embraced by the Obama administration, set common goals for reading, writing and math skills that students should develop from kindergarten through high school graduation. Curriculum is left to the states. The standards emphasize critical thinking and problem solving and are supposed to encourage students to think deeply about fewer topics.
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Students want more mobile devices in classroom
InformationWeek
When it comes to the influx of mobile devices into K-12 classrooms, you'll find both proponents and opponents among educators and parents. But ask kids what they think, and there's no debate: Laptops, smartphones and tablets are the future, they say. The Student Mobile Device Survey reveals that students almost unanimously believe mobile technology will change education and make learning more fun. The survey, which tallied the responses of 2,350 U.S. students, was conducted for learning company Pearson by Harris Interactive.
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10 keys to a successful school iPad program
eSchool News
It seems that every school is considering purchasing iPads these days, and Apple has reported that iPad sales to schools are currently outpacing MacBook sales by a very large margin. However, the rush to purchase iPads often precedes the careful planning and preparation that are so crucial to their success as educational tools. It's important for educators to understand that technology alone — no matter how full of potential it may be — is not the answer. Instead, iPads need to be integrated into the 21st-century classroom using a holistic approach. Teachers and administrators should identify the skills and abilities young people will need to succeed in our rapidly changing world and use technology to help students acquire them.
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How does multitasking change the way kids learn?
MindShift
Living rooms, dens, kitchens, even bedrooms: Investigators followed students into the spaces where homework gets done. Pens poised over their "study observation forms," the observers watched intently as the students — in middle school, high school and college, 263 in all — opened their books and turned on their computers.
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Rethinking difficult parents
Edutopia
View difficult parents as misguided advocates. Keep in mind that even an angry parent is better than an absent parent. While they can be very unpleasant, their anger often conveys advocacy. Virtually all parents, including most whose actions border on irrational, will cooperate if they really believe you care about their child, have their child's interests at heart and respect them.
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Meeting the challenges of student writing in the digital age
ED.gov Blog
Writing is an important part of the Common Core State Standards in English language arts, but what about students learning to employ the digital tools so natural to them outside the classroom to express themselves in school? The challenges to "going digital" with writing instruction range from choosing the best methods to employ the latest technological tools to accessing quality in-service training and joining communities of practice to staying current with the changing definition of a "literate" citizenry.
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A new role for avatars: Learning languages
MindShift
Most experts agree that the best way to learn a language is by immersing yourself in it. Now, with more sophisticated technology, another theory around language learning is being tested: the use of avatars to practice speaking. Alongside traditional methods, like listening, repeating and digital flashcards, created by companies like Rosetta Stone, Livemocha and AccelaStudy, a few tech companies have leveraged the idea that becoming someone else helps to learn a foreign language, especially when speaking it.
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The Speak Good English Movement focuses on top 10 tips
The Straits Times via AsiaOne News
Singapore: The Speak Good English Movement encourages all Singaporeans to improve their English with 10 simple tips. The Speak Good English Movement is putting out 10 quick and simple tips that all of us can use to increase our standard of English. These tips also show that taking a little step each day, whether it is reading a book or listening to the radio, can significantly help to improve our English proficiency.
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The big question: Should teachers or students talk more?
Edudemic
Natasha Baker, a contributor for Edudemic, writes: "I am a first year ESOL teacher in a middle school in Maryland. I just wanted to share some of my thoughts with fellow teachers and possibly receive some tips on how to improve my teaching skills. How often do we (teachers) become aware of how much time we spend talking in front of the students? On the flip side, how much time do we give to students to talk? According to the article Improving Immersion Student Oral Proficiency by Fostering the Use of Extended Discourse written by Isabelle Punchard, a Teaching and Learning Specialist in Minnesota, students learn to fluently speak another language, when they are given meaningful opportunities to use it."
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Visiting Assistant Professor in Applied Linguistics/ ESL, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA

Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts Lowell, USA

Accreditation Coordinator, ACCET, USA

For more jobs, please visit the TESOL Career Center.
 

The TESOL English Language Bulletin is presented as a service to members of TESOL International Association and other English language teaching professionals. For information about TESOL member benefits, visit www.tesol.org or contact us at membership@tesol.org.

TESOL English Language Bulletin is a digest of the most important news selected for TESOL International Association from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. TESOL International Association does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of TESOL.

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