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Home   Communities   Publications   Education   Issues   Convention   Join TESOL   June 13, 2014

 



At least 1.1 million pupils speak English as a second language
The Telegraph
United Kingdom: The number of schoolchildren speaking English as a second language has soared by a third in just five years amid fresh concerns that immigration may be putting a strain on the education system. Official figures show that the number of pupils who speak another language in the home exceeded 1.1 million for the first time this year. The proportion of non-native speakers in primary schools has now reached almost 1 in 5 following a year-on-year increase over the last decade. In some parts of London, children with English as a second language now make up as much as three quarters of the school roll, with around half of pupils being classified in towns and cities such as Slough, Luton and Leicester.
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Here's how engaging lessons motivate English learners
eSchool News
The children at my school, Manzanita Community School in Oakland, California, face the multiple challenges of poverty and learning English. More than 75 percent of our students receive free or reduced lunch, and over half of the children are learning English as a second language. Our newest immigrants speak Karen (from Burma), Arabic (from Yemen and Jordan) and Nepalese. These and other unfamiliar languages present a challenge to our teaching staff.
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Open-source software tools for TESOL professionals
By: Beth Crumpler
Open-source software is made by many people and can be freely used, changed and shared by anyone. These tools allow users to create, use, manage and share learning materials with flexibility and freedom. Open-source tools are invaluable for TESOL professionals. There are numerous open-source tools available for educational purposes. Here are some practical platforms that TESOL professionals can use for instructional planning, content creation, content sharing and learning management needs.
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TESOL Advocacy & Policy Summit 2014

Last chance to register. The TESOL Advocacy & Policy Summit takes place 22–24 June 2014, Washington, D.C., USA. Learn about U.S. federal education issues and advocate for policies that support English learners and the field of English language education. The summit features policy experts, leadership training, and an opportunity to network with advocates and colleagues from across the country. Registration closes Sunday, 15 June.

Separating Difference From Disability With Students Learning English as an Additional Language

This online course takes place 7 July–3 August. Explore assessment, intervention, and identification techniques effective in separating difference from disability. Learn what tools and strategies are available and appropriate to use. Registration closes 3 July.

ESL for the Secondary Science Teacher

This online course takes place 7 July – 3 August. Help your English language learners succeed in science. Explore the role of cultural perspectives in learning science, guiding principles of second language acquisition, and methods of instructional alignment of objectives, teaching, and assessment of scientific learning.

Changes in the Expertise of ESL Professionals in the Era of New Standards

This free virtual seminar takes place Wednesday, 18 July; 10:30 a.m. -12:00 p.m. ET. This is an era of new standards that will require educators to make deep changes in expertise to address the needs of English learners. Using vignettes of existing and envisioned teaching, the presenters discuss diverse conceptions of language, pedagogy, the learner, and educators leading to theoretical stances and pedagogy in light of the new standards.

TESOL International Academy in Seoul, Korea

Registration is now open for the International Academy that takes place 26–27 July 2014 in Seoul, Korea. Organized in partnership with Sookmyung Women's University, this 2-day academy provides the latest thinking on how to build quality ELT organizations and programs through effective leadership, management, and teacher training. Space is limited — register today.

For more TESOL education programs, please visit the TESOL website.






ESOL Teacher/Liaison to Israeli Families, Charles E. Smith Jewish Day School, USA

TOEFL Writer, Kaplan International, USA

Instructors—English as a Second Language, American University of the Middle East, Kuwait

For more jobs, please visit the TESOL Career Center.


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Here's how engaging lessons motivate English learners
eSchool News
The children at my school, Manzanita Community School in Oakland, California, face the multiple challenges of poverty and learning English.

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Los Angeles schools' plan for non-English speakers: Segregation or solution?
The Christian Science Monitor
Los Angeles schools are moving forward with a plan to separate English language learner students from native speakers in all core elementary school classes. Protests have erupted.

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US experts to train Saudis in English language teaching
Arab News
Saudi Arabia: The Ministry of Education has invited specialists from Columbia University in the United States to train Saudi teachers on methods of teaching the English language.

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US education system not helping immigrant parents
Helsinki Times
Finland: Immigrant parents in the United States face serious challenges accessing early elementary programs for their children, advocates are warning. The centrality of parents in early childhood education is undisputed, yet a new report from the Migration Policy Institute, a Washington-based think tank, highlights a broad lack of programming for immigrant parents. The report lists gaps in translation services as well as cultural and systems knowledge for parents as primary obstacles, and notes significant potential impacts on children's education.
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Possible redemption for No Child Left Behind?
The Atlantic
In the ten years since its implementation, the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 has been blamed for causing a decade-long decline in teacher job satisfaction and eroding teacher autonomy by taking control of curricula out of their hands. But a new study published online in Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, "Estimating the Effects of No Child Left Behind on Teachers and Their Work Environment," suggests that NCLB has not actually affected teacher happiness in these ways — on the contrary, some measures of job satisfaction, including classroom control and teachers' perceptions of administrator support, have increased on average since the implementation of the legislation.
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Lawsuit: Texas' English language programs fall short
The Texas Tribune
Texas has failed to properly monitor public school programs intended to help students with language barriers learn English, according to a federal lawsuit brought by a Hispanic legal advocacy group. In its lawsuit, the League of United Latin American Citizens alleges that the state's lack of support and supervision has led to "grossly deficient" language instruction programs, especially in middle and high schools where English language learning students "continue to perform abysmally." The complaint is a continuation of a legal battle between LULAC and the state that began in 2006, when the group sued over the same issue.
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This is how much more states spend on prisoners than on students
The Huffington Post
Perhaps if states spent more money on educating students, they would not have to spend so much money keeping prisoners incarcerated. New maps compiled by research engine FindTheBest show how much states spend on funding their average K-12 pupil, compared to what the average prisoner costs for state taxpayers. FindTheBest used research compiled in 2012 from the Vera Institute of Justice, which analyzed the full cost of prisons to taxypayers in 40 states, and 2010-2011 information from the National Center for Education Statistics, which used federal, local and state data to glean its results.
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With more international students come retention issues
University World News
Like many American colleges, the University of West Florida has seen marked growth in recent years in its international student enrolment. But it was a different trend that alarmed Rachel Errington, director of the university's office of international students. The number of foreign students leaving the public institution on Florida's Gulf Coast without earning a degree was also on the rise.
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TRENDING ARTICLES
Missed last week's issue? See which articles your colleagues read most.

    Common Core test experts explain ELL and special education supports (Education Week)
From language skills to teaching prowess (Language Magazine)
4 favorite tools for English language learning (eSchool News)
To write English like a professor, don't rely on Google translate (The Conversation)
Motivating kids to learn English is vital for the country's future growth (The Nation)

Don't be left behind. Click here to see what else you missed.


Is flexible study the future for universities?
The Guardian
For a brief period, the popular image of the university student was embodied by Sebastian Flyte of Brideshead Revisited: 18-years old, male, privileged, and ready to spend three years in one of the world's most elite institutions. But the idea of a typical student no longer holds: today's students are just as likely to be female, or older, or from overseas, or studying part-time while holding down a full-time job. Traditional models of provision no longer work for these students.
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Good English language skills required for this job
The Sydney Morning Herald
Australia: Jobs in Australia increasingly are requiring higher levels of skills. The occupational outlook for unskilled or semi-skilled roles is relatively bleak compared with roles requiring certificates, diplomas, trades and degrees. One skill that has never been more important is English language proficiency. If your English skills are poor, you will find it challenging to be shortlisted for roles when applying, and your choices of occupation severely circumscribed.
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Looking for similar articles? Search here, keyword ENGLISH.


Increasing number of Saudi women travel to study English
Saudi Gazette
Saudi Arabia: There has been an increasing demand from Saudi women in secondary schools and universities to study English language in European or Asian countries. Many travel and tourism agencies are providing packages to meet the demand, while assuring that they are not violating Ministry of Higher Education regulations. According to these agencies, many women prefer to travel in groups with relatives or friends and want to reside with families that do not have sons.
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Report: English language literacy in immigrant parents is important for early childhood education
Latin Post
Early childhood education is absent from the lives of the neediest, poorest and fastest-growing populations, in spite of the expansion of preschool programs meant to address the needs of children across the economic spectrum, particularly disadvantaged youths. And more than any others, children in immigrant households are the least likely to enroll their children in federal and state preschool programs, due mainly to language and literacy barriers.
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Size matters: Smaller classes spark better learning
By: Archita Datta Majumdar
The move to reduce class size and bring about higher-quality education is a not new one, but it has gained new momentum with a new study. Research by Australian educator David Zyngier shows that there can be significant difference in student performance with a smaller class size. Zyngier analyzed 112 peer-reviewed studies from 1979-2014 to prove how the size of the class can narrow the achievement gap. With smaller classes, teachers can be less occupied with maintaining discipline, and can instead focus on the individual growth of their students.
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Does the way a classroom is decorated affect learning?
The New York Times
A new study tries to determine whether there might be a correlation between how a room is decorated and kindergartners' learning. The researchers wanted to know if too many decorations could actually be distracting or overstimulating for young minds. But similar questions could be asked about how classroom environment might influence older students' academic performance as well. Does the way your classroom is decorated affect your learning?
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The TESOL English Language Bulletin is presented as a service to members of TESOL International Association and other English language teaching professionals. For information about TESOL member benefits, visit www.tesol.org or contact us at membership@tesol.org.

TESOL English Language Bulletin is a digest of the most important news selected for TESOL International Association from thousands of sources by the editors of MultiBriefs, an independent organization that also manages and sells advertising. TESOL International Association does not endorse any of the advertised products and services. Opinions expressed in the articles are those of the author and not of TESOL.

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